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Doonesbury by Garry Trudeau for February 15, 2015

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    BE THIS GUY Premium Member about 5 years ago

    My dream job was to be a pin setter in a bowling alley.Umm… sorry. That was Homer Simpson’s dream job.

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    Argythree  about 5 years ago

    I’m 65+ and I still have figured out what my dream job is. Once it was to be either an archaeologist or an astronaut, but you can’t do that with heavy duty arthritis. Maybe my dream job is to daydream all day….

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    KeepKeeper  about 5 years ago

    I had that pin setters job back in the 40’s. It was no dream job.

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    Mike31g  about 5 years ago

    Never heard of a T-shirt cannon until today. Google found this firing a T-Shirt cannon Might be within Zipper’s skillset?

    Mike

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    wetidlerjr  about 5 years ago

    In the small town I live in (Central Indiana) the local alley didn’t have auto pin setters until the 1960s. This happened when the old one shut down and a new one was built.

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    Retired Dude Premium Member about 5 years ago

    I have my dream job right now. I get up; make coffee; read the online comics; check my email; take a walk if the weather’s nice; have a little lunch; decide if I want to paint in oils or watercolor; read for a while or work sudoku puzzles; watch netflix; make supper and watch Wheel of Fortune; more netflix; and go to bed. It’s a grueling job but someone has to do it.

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    Chronoclast  about 5 years ago

    logic, you might have to step up your game :-)

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    Army_Nurse  about 5 years ago

    INRE pin setting, I too worked the pits in ‘63, metro DC. You had to be fast and nimble to avoid getting clobbered by someone w/ a strong arm who’d scatter the pins all over. The little catwalk we had above the pits wasn’t much, safety-wise. ten cents a frame, tips based on how fast you were.

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    Randy Walters  about 5 years ago

    Ol’ Zonker is looking remarkably businesslike, savvy and mature. Times moves on, and things change.

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    dwdl21  about 5 years ago

    In high school back in the 70’s mine was to roadie for a top rock band and see the world.

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    David Huie Green  about 5 years ago

    Aim high, Zipper.

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    BaltoBill  about 5 years ago

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    Packratjohn Premium Member about 5 years ago

    The cool thing about being a cartoonist is that you can make as many figures as you want. I usually only make stick figures. That’s the limit of my ability.

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    Lee Taplinger  about 5 years ago

    Computer programming is a dream job – you get paid a lot of money to basically solve puzzles, you look up at the clock and the day is done, you get paid to travel, the company pays for the flights, the nice hotels, fancy restaurants.

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    Lee Taplinger  about 5 years ago

    Pin setting sounds not much different than gunnery range worker – a Marine friend of mine said that one day when he was at the range a bullet took a wild ricochet and killed a soldier who was supposed to be safely protected.

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    paul courry  about 5 years ago

    Garden Grove, CA in 1972, the local 12 lane bowling alley still had pin boys. I remember bowling there. City right next to Disneyland.

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    kaffekup   about 5 years ago

    I’m 65 also, and hope to decide what I want to be when I grow up!

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    timbob2313 Premium Member about 5 years ago

    I had my dream job for 18 years until I was injured on the job and had to take early-defined-retirement when I was 48. My daily schedule is to get up late, spend two or three hours reading ny daily paper, spend a couple of hours on my computer, then read off and on until about 2am .The only TV I watch is the local news, some programs on DIY, Velocity, Science, and History 1 and 2 and TDS along with The Nightly Show and Bill Maher on HBO. To me, this is heaven on earth. I make enough with my retirement to not have to watch my spending. Life is good.I got the travel bug out of my life when I was much younger when my wife and I visited 73 countries over 26 years, so now, in an average year we drive about 3,000 miles. My wife loves to garden and knit while watching Korean TV which she was unable to before. While we spend 24 hours a day together, we have enough different activities that we never get on each other’s nerves

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    Gokie5  about 5 years ago

    I left the quaint little backwater village of Pittsburgh, PA, in 1944 just before I turned nine – there were pin-setter guys there.

    My dream job was becoming a singer – classical, opera-type stuff, preferably, where people would go “oo” and “ah.” Sang solos for church choir, and the general populace thought I was great. Musicians, though, were all “meh.” Finally realized that my voice teacher, Donna, didn’t sing so much better than I did because she was ten years older – the reason was that she was Donna, and I wasn’t.

    It’s been a great life, anyhow.

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    Liverlips McCracken Premium Member about 5 years ago

    Zipper must have started consuming the product at roughly the same age he conceived of his dream job. When Zonker is the voice of maturity in the house, you know things have gone horribly wrong.

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    David Huie Green  about 5 years ago

    @Night-Gaunt49From his biography:“A year later he was already a master of several regional dishes. Over the course of the next 30 years, Sanders held many of the jobs listed above, but throughout it all his skill as a cook remained.In 1930, the then 40-year-old Sanders was operating a service station in Corbin, Kentucky, and it was there that he began cooking for hungry travelers who stopped in for gas. He didn’t have a restaurant yet, so patrons ate from his own dining table in the station’s humble living quarters. It was then that he invented what’s called “home meal replacement” — selling complete meals to busy, time-strapped families. He called it, “Sunday Dinner, Seven Days a Week.”As Sanders’ fame grew, Governor Ruby Laffoon made him a Kentucky Colonel in 1935 in recognition of his contributions to the state’s cuisine. Within four years, his establishment was listed in Duncan Hines’ “Adventures in Good Eating.”. KFC was an outgrowth of a lifetime of work. Yes, he expanded much later in life, but he expanded from great achievement.

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    kylearnett  about 5 years ago

    Here in Mid-Michigan, there was a Lutheran Church that had 4 lanes set up, using 2 pin boys. That was in operation well into the ’80s

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    David Huie Green  about 5 years ago

    By the way,My cousin, Donald Wayne Huie, died in prison yesterday.He was there for raising marijuana.He died as a consequence of smoking tobacco.He raised the marijuana because it was illegal and yielded lots of easy money.Had it been legal, he would’ve raised whatever WAS illegal, since he was after the money, not the marijuana.

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    David Huie Green  about 5 years ago

    “I see where I was in error. After he sold KFC he started another business and he was in his 70’s. My error for not checking.”.

    No sweat, I was just concentrating on the fact that Colonel Sanders worked and worked and worked.We all have good ideas but seldom work them.The world is worse off for our laziness.(Other than the would-be criminals, killers and terrorists who also don’t follow up on their evil plans.)

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    StCleve72  about 5 years ago

    I ran a ski lift once. I’d commute to the top of the mountain in the morning, sat in a little heated booth with a great view and make sure everybody got off the lift safely. During off hours I skied for free.

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