Tom Toles by Tom Toles

Tom Toles

Comments (22) (Please sign in to comment)

  1. Ira Nayman

    Ira Nayman said, 9 months ago

    And it’s all their fault!

  2. jnik23260

    jnik23260 said, 9 months ago

    No! it’s Obama’s fault!

  3. Wabbit

    Wabbit GoComics PRO Member said, 9 months ago

    We are controlled by war-profiteering corporations who have aliens from another dimention for friends. They plan to kill off a whole lot of us because they consider us to be excess baggage.
    So then How do You explain it?
    Corporations have the rights of people without any of the things that make people human, like love, empathy, compassion.

  4. JmcaRice

    JmcaRice GoComics PRO Member said, 8 months ago

    So much for the Obama-Clinton-Kerry guarantees of mid-east peace . . .

  5. Ted Lind

    Ted Lind GoComics PRO Member said, 8 months ago

    Yea, obviously the democrats are the cause of all the problems. What else could it possibly be??? It must be nice to live with such a simple minded world view. No thought required.

  6. Jase99

    Jase99 GoComics PRO Member said, 8 months ago

    @Wabbit

    The Israeli/Palestinian conflict is one of the few that is not kept alive by wartime profiteering.

  7. jack75287

    jack75287 said, 8 months ago

    The only people stopping the Palestinians from creating a state is their selves.

  8. Cerabooge

    Cerabooge said, 8 months ago

    jack75287: I’ll take it further, and say that Palestiians already have their own state. It’s called Jordan. science.co.il says it succinctly:
    “In 1917 Great Britain issued the Balfour Declaration for “the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people”. In 1922 Britain allocated nearly 80% of Palestine to Transjordan. Thus, Jordan covers the majority of the land of Palestine under British Mandate. Jordan also includes the majority of the Arabs who lived there. In other words, Jordan is the Arab portion of Palestine.

  9. Doughfoot

    Doughfoot said, 8 months ago

    @Cerabooge

    There was no American nation nor American identity in 1750, nor were there an American people. Young George Washington was a Virginian first and a Briton second, or perhaps the other way around, but he certainly was not an American: to him, that term would have applied more to the Indians than to the colonists. By 1800 the European inhabitants of eastern America has become Americans with a distinct national identity they did not have before
    br>Similarly, in 1914 there was no “Palestinian people” there were only Arabs living in that part of the Ottoman Empire called Palestine, which was a geographical term for a region that had no fixed or universally recognized boundaries. The last century has created the Palestinian identity, and the Palestinian nation, just as it has created Jordan and Israel: neither of which existed as a nation-state in 1914. The boundaries of Israel were forged in 1948-1949 in its war for independence. In 1967 Israel seized additional territory by force in retaliation for being attacked by its Arab neighbors. However, the people living in that occupied territory never gave their consent to that conquest nor agreed to live under Israeli rule. Israel occupied that territory, but has never annexed, never incorporated it into Israel, nor given its people Israeli citizenship nor equal votes in Israel’s legislature, nor do they receive equal justice in Israeli courts, nor are they governed by the same laws that Israelis (including Arab Israelis, i.e. Arabs who live in Israel proper and have Israeli citizenship) are governed by.

    Even if you assert that Israel acted correctly in occupying and controlling the West Bank and Gaza in 1967, what about the nearly fifty years since?


    The U.S. occupied Japan in 1945. Few would question the right of the U.S. to have done that. But then Imagine that we were still in control of Japan today, with walled (and expanding) American settlements taking up much of the best land there, the Japanese unable to restore their independence, but also unable to become American citizens, vote in American elections, or enjoy equal right with Americans within their own islands. You think that would be a sustainable situation? How about if one of the Japanese islands, Hokkaido say, was allowed for the Japanese it understood than Honshu was eventually to become purely American and the Japanese could be expected to move elsewhere?

    Personally, I don’t care much about ancient history. The Palestinians have no claim to the land they lost, mostly by abandonment, in 1948. And Israel has no claim to land taken by conquest, and held by force, over the objections of its population, who have become in the last 65 years a distinct people. Who was on that land a century or a thousand years ago is irrelevant. Who is on it now is more to the point. And 83% of the people living in the occupied West Bank are Palestinians (2,250,000), while only 17% (460,000) are Israeli settlers. Then you’ve got the 1,700,000 Palestinians who live in Gaza, who are neither occupied, nor permitted to act as an independent nation, but live in what is little different from an “autonomous” ghetto.

    In the end, Israel has to either acknowledge Palestine as an independent nation over which Israel has no legitimate power; or they have to incorporate Palestine as part of a greater Israel with citizenship for all. That larger single-state Israel would then be 45% Arab and 55% Jewish, but given their respective birthrates, annexing all the Palestinian territories and calling it all Israel, it would be an Israel that would be majority Arab in another decade or two. Annexing the West Bank but leaving Gaza would maintain the Jewish majority for a time. But with even 4 million Arabs to 7 million Jews, how long would Israel be able to remain a “Jewish State”?

    While I don’t think the Palestinians have behaved wisely or well, they do exist, they are a separate and distinct people now, and it is hardly surprising that they are complete fed up with the status quo in which they are second or third-class citizens in the country of their birth, whether you choose to call it Israel or Palestine.

  10. Night-Gaunt49

    Night-Gaunt49 said, 8 months ago

    @Cerabooge

    Then why don’t the Palestinians who aren’t in Jordan move? Maybe because where they live is their home. So far almost no one accepts them as a group least of all the Israelis.

  11. Night-Gaunt49

    Night-Gaunt49 said, 8 months ago

    @Doughfoot

    Nicely laid out recent history. I fear that a certain faction of Israel, even the secular ones, see it is their birthright to have Judea aka West Bank back in their hands and that the boundaries of their Israel is far larger, and will be just one country full of Israeli Jews only. So I see no peace for them till every Palestinian is ran into the sea or taken to Jordon or killed. A sad state of affairs and all the US does is totally support Israel no matter what they do. Both Hamas and Israel have done war crimes against each other. Only Israel isn’t on any terror state list.

  12. Beau Nobo

    Beau Nobo said, 8 months ago

    The Bush legacy.

  13. The Wolf In Your Midst

    The Wolf In Your Midst said, 8 months ago

    @Ted Lind

    Don’t you know? The world’s problems are automatically solved when a Republican is President, and stay that way until a Democrat takes office. Thus, by getting elected- twice!- the Middle East is all Obama’s fault.

  14. Tue Elung-Jensen

    Tue Elung-Jensen said, 8 months ago

    @Doughfoot

    except the area was given to the Israeli by England through the UN, so I highly doubt they “abandoned” it.

  15. dtroutma

    dtroutma GoComics PRO Member said, 8 months ago

    The toon well illustrates what’s been left after either the U.S. or Israel, “defend themselves”. Iraq, Afghanistan, Gaza, Beirut and southern Lebanon, dead civilians as well, and yes, we told Iraqis we were going to bomb soon as well, but where could they go? The arguments we and our “friends” use, are no more valid than the radicals we’re supposed to be opposing. Count bodies and consider who those folks were, and what were their dreams, not OUR assumptions about them.

  16. Load the rest of the comments (7).