Tom Toles by Tom Toles

Tom Toles

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  1. AlexanderTheGoodEnough

    AlexanderTheGoodEnough said, 5 months ago

    “You have to wait until you’ll vote the right way.” Just so. That town is FULL of Democratic would-be voters. Voter suppression at its finest.

  2. capndunzzl

    capndunzzl said, 5 months ago

    …pretty soon none of us will be able to vote.

  3. Mark

    Mark said, 5 months ago

    None of you really know what this cartoon is about, do you?

  4. Illegal Seagull

    Illegal Seagull said, 5 months ago

    Waiting for what? Payoffs from the party precinct captain? It must be a long waiting line in DC.

  5. Al S.

    Al S. said, 5 months ago

    @Illegal Seagull

    @Mark
    Per Wikipedia…
     
    Voting rights of citizens in the District of Columbia differ from the rights of citizens in each of the 50 U.S. states. The United States Constitution grants each state voting representation in both houses of the United States Congress. As the U.S. capital, the District of Columbia is a special federal district, not a state, and therefore does not have voting representation in the Congress. The Constitution grants the Congress exclusive jurisdiction over the District in “all cases whatsoever.”
     
    In the United States House of Representatives, the District is represented by a delegate, who is not allowed to vote on the House floor but can vote on procedural matters and in congressional committees. D.C. residents have no representation in the United States Senate. As a result of the Twenty-third Amendment to the United States Constitution, adopted in 1961, the District is entitled to three electoral votes in the election of the President of the United States.
     
    The District’s lack of voting representation in Congress has been an issue since the capital’s founding. Numerous proposals have been introduced to change this situation, including legislation and constitutional amendments, returning the District to the state of Maryland, and making the District into a new state. All proposals have been met with political or constitutional challenges and there has been no change in the District’s representation in the Congress.

  6. Doughfoot

    Doughfoot said, 5 months ago

    Alexandria, D.C. became Alexandria, Va. in 1847. Arlington County became part of Virginia at the same time, though originally part of D.C. No reason that Georgetown, D.C. could not become Georgetown, Md. in the same way. The District of Columbia now has a larger population than the United States as a whole had when the District was created. This is not what the Founders had in mind, nor is it a reasonable situation. D.C. should be pared down to the area immediately around the capitol, white house, mall, etc., the part occupied chiefly by federal buildings and parks, and the rest go back to Maryland, so that the inhabitant might actually live in one of the United States.

    Not that I expect that to happen.

  7. Gresch

    Gresch GoComics PRO Member said, 5 months ago

    Is there not a concern that the expansion of our Federal Government is why there are some many people living in DC.

  8. carlmi

    carlmi GoComics PRO Member said, 5 months ago

    Just give the current half of DC back to the original state, Maryland, like the first half was given back to Virginia.

  9. MangeyMoose

    MangeyMoose GoComics PRO Member said, 5 months ago

    @Al S.

    Al, I never knew any of this. Thanks for the post.

  10. JmcaRice

    JmcaRice GoComics PRO Member said, 5 months ago

    Retrocession is a good idea. Gingrich actually proposed it back in the 90’s but the Dems would not go for it.

  11. Doughfoot

    Doughfoot said, 5 months ago

    @Gresch

    “Is there not a concern that the expansion of our Federal Government is why there are some many people living in DC.?”

    The expansions you’re talking about occured during the Civil War, and the World Wars. The Federal Government, at least in terms of the number of people it employs, has not grown in absolute terms since 1960, and in per capita terms has actually shrunk.

    The civilian federal workforce reached a peak in 1968-1969 at just over 3,000,000, or about 1.5% of all people in the US. (It peaked again under Ronald Reagan and Bush I, 1987-1992, at over 3,000,000 again, but that was from a larger population.) In 2012, the most recent year I have figures for, the Federal civilian workforce was 2.7 million, out of a total population of 314 million, or less than 0.9% of the total population.

    Just in terms of number of people on the payroll, the Federal government hasn’t varied much in size in the last 60 years. In terms of the pecentage of Americans employed by the Federal government, it would have it hire close to 2 million more people to employ as large a percentage of the nation as it did in the 1960s.

    https://www.opm.gov/policy-data-oversight/data-analysis-documentation/federal-employment-reports/historical-tables/total-government-employment-since-1962/

    http://www.multpl.com/united-states-population/table

    Furthermore, the population of DC is only 75% now of what it was in 1950. Then it was 800,000; now it is just a tad over 600,000.

  12. Doughfoot

    Doughfoot said, 5 months ago

    P.S. In 1970, DC was 70% black; today is it 50% black.

  13. TheTrustedMechanic

    TheTrustedMechanic GoComics PRO Member said, 5 months ago

    @Doughfoot

    “Yeah, but…..” (insert republican distortion of the truth or statistics to justify their partisan hatred {here}.)

  14. martens misses all her friends

    martens misses all her friends GoComics PRO Member said, 5 months ago

    @Doughfoot

    I like your suggestion of Marylandizing most of the district, but I fear it will never get off the ground.

  15. moderateisntleft

    moderateisntleft said, 5 months ago

    @capndunzzl

    or more likely, the weight of our vote will be detrmined by our wealth. THe more money you have, the more speech you are entitled to. Wehn the country was founded, only land-owners could vote. maybe we’ll get back to that.

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