Steve Breen by Steve Breen

Steve Breen

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  1. motivemagus

    motivemagus said, 1 day ago

    No, reckless isn’t even strong enough.
    The categories seem to be as follows:
    1. Willfully ignorant: the people who believe the anti-vaxxers’ nonsense despite categorical proof that vaccines work and are not dangerous. (case in point: the person who supposedly showed a link between autism and vaccines was a FRAUD – wrote a paper with no data, in part to drum up business for his fake “autism therapy.” His paper was retracted, his doctorate stripped from him. HUGE studies since show that even the idea makes no sense.) Or people who think that it is somehow healthier to experience a potentially fatal disease than to build up immunity through vaccines (which use the body’s own systems).
    2. Arrogant and selfish: People who do seem to think vaccines work, but aren’t willing to administer them to their own children, so count on the good vaccination practices of others to protect THEIR children. This puts those unable to be vaccinated at risk, because of reduced herd immunity.

    As Larry Wilmore noted, this is not a first-world problem. This is a third-world problem. Except, as Melinda Gates pointed out, people in third-world countries will walk “ten kilometers in the heat” to get their children vaccinated, because “they’ve seen death.”

  2. r2varney

    r2varney said, 1 day ago

    Complacency.. We need some good old fashioned epidemics to smarten some people up. Fortunately it is the children of those naysayers who will get polio.. measles.. small pox.. Overall the gene pool improves.

  3. I Play One On TV

    I Play One On TV said, 1 day ago

    @r2varney

    Not altogether true. Although vaccines will increase resistance, they do not provide total immunity. If you are vaccinated against measles, for example, and are almost never near the measles germ, you won’t get measles. However, if you are surrounded by people with active measles cases, you are much more likely to contract measles, whether you have been vaccinated or not. So, although vaccinated children are less likely to contract those diseases, their odds of contracting them are much higher when in the company of those who are not vaccinated. Non-vaccinated kids are a danger to all children in their circles, not just themselves.
    So anti-vax parents are not only putting their own kids at risk, but the children of others. Talk about an undeserved feeling of privilege.

    And let’s cut to the meat of the matter: who started this anti-vax movement? Jessica Simpson? Why would anyone expect her to know anything about medicine, and why would anyone be willing to risk the lives of their children because of what she had to say?

    In a People-magazine world, way too many people listen to the wrong people for the wrong reasons.

    If Kim Kardashian were to tell us we need to stop getting regular dental checkups, how many would be willing to let their teeth rot out of their mouths as a result?

  4. Hiram Bingham

    Hiram Bingham said, 1 day ago

    @I Play One On TV I Play One On TV said, “If Kim Kardashian were to tell us we need to stop getting regular dental checkups, how many would be willing to let their teeth rot out of their mouths as a result?”


    Probably a couple million.

  5. dtroutma

    dtroutma GoComics PRO Member said, 1 day ago

    “Play one” I think you’re thinking of Jenny McCarthy. There may have been some problems with mercury preservatives in some vaccines, since eliminated, but still NOT related to autism. Al Jazeera had a very good, and accurate, report with lots of medical experts from several specialties pointing ou that autism is being proven more with each new research to be GENETIC. Now environmental problems may contribute to mutations, but that’s NOT VACCINES! Interesting note btw, is they found that syblings with autism have variant forms and genetic linkages, which is VERY interesting from the standpoint of genetics, mutations, and yes, potential environments during early development of the fertilized embryo, or even the sperm and embryo themselves!

  6. The Wolf In Your Midst

    The Wolf In Your Midst said, 1 day ago

    @dtroutma

    Great, you had to mention Al-Jazeera, didn’t you? Now we’ll have the nutcases calling vaccinations a terrorist plot.

  7. I Play One On TV

    I Play One On TV said, 1 day ago

    @dtroutma

    ““Play one” I think you’re thinking of Jenny McCarthy.”

    You may very well be right. I have a problem telling apart the various flavors of the week from Hollywood. Thank you for setting me straight.

    I will venture this, though: I am willing to believe that neither Ms. Simpson nor Ms. McCarthy are trustworthy sources of medical information.

  8. Jase99

    Jase99 GoComics PRO Member said, 1 day ago

    @I Play One On TV

    “Not altogether true. Although vaccines will increase resistance, they do not provide total immunity. If you are vaccinated against measles, for example, and are almost never near the measles germ, you won’t get measles.”

    I’m not sure about other vaccinations, but getting the measles vaccine itself carries the risk of getting the measles. My sister caught it right after getting vaccinated.

  9. warjoski

    warjoski GoComics PRO Member said, 1 day ago

    @I Play One on TV and Jase99

    Even if it doesn’t eliminate the risk entirely though, doesn’t it lessen both the length and severity of the episode? That’s a serious question. I don’t know and have heard both sides of the argument.

  10. pcolli

    pcolli said, 1 day ago

    I had the measels vaccine as a child and I have had measels twice since…. argue with various doctors, not with me.

  11. s49nav

    s49nav said, about 22 hours ago

    Steve Breen should by all means get his kids vaccinated.

  12. motivemagus

    motivemagus said, about 21 hours ago

    @s49nav

    I think he has. Have you?

  13. wiatr

    wiatr GoComics PRO Member said, about 20 hours ago

    Being of a certain age, I had several varieties of measles when I was a kid I can say that it was no fun. I think those who can take the vaccine should. Add in the chicken pox and that was 4-5 weeks of my life spent badly ill.
    Parents who don’t get their kids vaccinated ought to be arrested for child abuse. JMHO

  14. Ryan (Say what now‽)

    Ryan (Say what now‽) GoComics PRO Member said, about 17 hours ago

    @Jase99

    “I’m not sure about other vaccinations, but getting the measles vaccine itself carries the risk of getting the measles. My sister caught it right after getting vaccinated.”
    .
    The vaccine contains dead germs so the body will build antibodies. This may take several days. So if your sister caught the measles right after getting the shot, she had contracted live germs from somewhere else.

  15. Lynne B

    Lynne B GoComics PRO Member said, about 13 hours ago

    @Jase99

    Jase, there is a 10% chance of developing a rash from the vaccine after measles vaccination, but it isn’t measles — it’s “sub measles”, the actual measles infection carries a dangerously high fever and a 30% complication rate. There’s a massive difference.

    However, a single dose of MMR carries a 95% protection against actual measles infection — which means that 5% of recipients can still catch measles — plus, it takes a minimum of two weeks for immunity to develop after a vaccine. If your sister was exposed to the actual disease while still vulnerable, then yes, she would have caught the disease — just not from the vaccine itself.

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