Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis

Pearls Before Swine

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  1. ODDBALL

    ODDBALL said, over 2 years ago

    Is Bob gonna die? Most Bob’s don’t live long here at PBS.

  2. idroppedmygum

    idroppedmygum said, over 2 years ago

    Now pig’s all confused…

  3. mojitobaby

    mojitobaby said, over 2 years ago

    Bet you won’t hear a peep out to Bob today.

  4. gir63

    gir63 said, over 2 years ago

    Does this make you angry Bob?

  5. Sisyphos

    Sisyphos said, over 2 years ago

    Bobbie Bluebird! —Do it , Rat! It’s SO you!

  6. mailinutile2

    mailinutile2 said, over 2 years ago

    couldn’t they just ask to reduce the audio volume ?

  7. homer911

    homer911 said, over 2 years ago

    Why do people always pick on “Bob”

  8. masterskrain

    masterskrain GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    That’s so unlike Rat to ask!
    Most of the idiots that I have encountered doing things like that don’t even ask first, they just go ahead and do it!
    I do have to agree with Goat, though. There is almost nothing more annoying then being forced to listen to one end of a phone conversation in a restaurant, especially with some nitwit who has totally lost the ability to modulate the volume of his or her voice! Yelling into your phone DOES NOT make your point of view any more correct, or forceful, or whatever!

  9. crabbyrino

    crabbyrino GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    We older folks ‘yell’ into the phone ‘cause we can’t hear… that always helps me (LOL)

  10. Gorbag42

    Gorbag42 said, over 2 years ago

    How is someone talking on a phone any more annoying than their talking with another diner. Let’s just enforce total silence in public places, eh?

  11. LaffCat HEHEHE

    LaffCat HEHEHE GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    Take a look at today’s Lio

  12. hariseldon59

    hariseldon59 said, over 2 years ago

    @Gorbag42

    Actually, studies have shown that listening to someone talking on a phone is indeed more annoying than listening to both sides of a conversation:
    ‘Halfalogue’: Overheard Cell-Phone Conversations Are Not Only Annoying but Reduce Our Attention
    “Yeah, I’m on my way home.” “That’s funny.” “Uh-huh.” “What? No! I thought you were – ” “Oh, ok.” Listening to someone talk on a cell phone is very annoying. A new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, finds out why: Hearing just one side of a conversation is much more distracting than hearing both sides and reduces our attention in other tasks.
    Lauren Emberson, a psychology Ph.D. candidate at Cornell University, came up with the idea for the study when she was taking the bus as an undergraduate student at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. “I was commuting for 45 minutes by bus every day and I really felt like I couldn’t do anything else when someone was on a cell phone,” she says. “I couldn’t read. I couldn’t even listen to my music. I was just so distracted, and I started to wonder about why that could be.”
    For the experiment, Emberson recorded two pairs of female college roommates as they had a cell phone conversation. She recorded each conversation both as a dialogue, in which both women could be heard by a listener, and as a “halfalogue” in which only one side of the conversation could be heard, the same as overhearing a cell-phone conversation. She also recorded each woman recapping the conversation in a monologue. Then she played the recordings at volunteers as they did various tasks on the computer that require attention, such as tracking a moving dot using a computer mouse.
    Sure enough, volunteers were much worse at the concentration tasks when they could only hear half of the conversation. Emberson thinks this is because our brains more or less ignore predictable things, while paying more attention to things that are unpredictable. When both sides of the conversation are audible, it flows predictably, but a cell phone conversation is quite unpredictable. Emberson conducted the study with Gary Lupyan of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Michael Goldstein of Cornell University, and Michael Spivey of the University of California-Merced.
    “It’s definitely changed my own etiquette,” says Emberson. “I’m a lot more sensitive about talking on the phone in public. It has a really profound effect on the cognition of the people around you, and it’s not because they’re eavesdropping or they’re bad people. Their cognitive mechanism basically means that they’re forced to listen.”

  13. underwriter

    underwriter said, over 2 years ago

    @hariseldon59, which is why even a passenger shouldn’t be talking on a cell phone in a moving car. Thanks for this information. (p.s. I miss Isaac too.)

  14. Popeyes4arm

    Popeyes4arm said, over 2 years ago

    someone needs to shut down TwitFace or FaceButt or all the other silly timewasters are out there, Oh! like GoComics!
    Nevermind.

  15. FANOLIO  (Fan o' Lio)

    FANOLIO (Fan o' Lio) said, over 2 years ago

    I don’t like very loud talkers in public places, whether they are on a phone or not.

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