Pat Oliphant by Pat Oliphant

Pat Oliphant

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  1. emptc12

    emptc12 said, about 1 year ago

    Like watching Monty Python’s Flying … Congress.
    Pthbbbbt!

  2. masterskrain

    masterskrain GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    Actually, Monty Python had more class, sensibility, and dignity then the current "Con"gress!
    Come to think of it, so did Benny Hill!

  3. pirate227

    pirate227 said, about 1 year ago

    “Think”? HAHAHAHA!

  4. Godfreydaniel

    Godfreydaniel said, about 1 year ago

    I miss your posts, emptc12, always the kind of excellent combination of wit and wisdom that Mark Twain, Dr. Seuss, and Daffy Duck excelled at! I hardly see you these days but (with no sarcasm whatsoever), I do miss your posts.

  5. BillH77

    BillH77 said, about 1 year ago

    Yep… America you really put those Republicans in their place.

    Now you can run up the debt well past $17 Trillion. If the prime rate ever goes to historic norms the interest payment on the principal will eat this nation alive. The Fed has to do that in 2014 or 2015.

    Also, now America has Obama care… a health care system rigged together by IRS programmers and run by clones of the TSA. Yep, that will work out fine.

    The debt is $17 trilloin and GDP is less than $16 Trillion. China is working with the rest of the world to “depeg” the dollar.

    Nothing destroys a government faster than insolvency.

  6. emptc12

    emptc12 said, about 1 year ago

    @Godfreydaniel

    Thanks, that’s more than I deserve. There are lots of good, well-documented comments on these sites, but also a lot of childish spitballs. Wish I had more to offer, am reading through my books, those I never really understood. For instance, various Penguin classics of Greek and Roman literature, some by Nietzsche, science essays by Stephen Jay Gould, speeches given through the centuries. (A pedantic mishmash, I know.) As I get older I seem to understand them better – is that usually the case?
    .
    Amazing that these brilliant minds were on the earth once and their observations are put to so little use. Stoking myself with their thoughts I briefly feel as though I’ve lived thousands of years and I am ready to give the right answers to everyone – but … but then it quickly evaporates.
    .
    I often recall the dying words of Tycho Brahe, “Let me not seem to have lived in vain. Let me not seem to have lived in vain.”
    .
    Thanks again for your kind words.

  7. charliekane

    charliekane said, about 1 year ago

    Reminiscent of our friend the Road Runner. Sets the trap himself, then falls victim to it.

  8. mskemple

    mskemple said, about 1 year ago

    @emptc12

    You might enjoy the wit and humor of Benjamin Franklin , Mark Twain or James Whitcomb Riley. The quips and short stories of Americas early authors I’ve found very entertaining and full of small truths.

  9. NoMo'ol'tomcats

    NoMo'ol'tomcats said, about 1 year ago

    A petard was a small metal-encased explosive used to breach an enemy’s walls. The accurate quote is
    _"For ’tis sport to have the enginer/Hoist with his own petar’;/ and ’t shall go hard/But I will delve one yard below their mines/And blow them at the moon:/ O, ’tis most sweet,/When in one line two crafts directly meet.."

  10. Mike Rossi

    Mike Rossi said, about 1 year ago

    @charliekane

    My good man it was Wiley E Coyote who set the traps for the Road Runner that he ultimately fell prey to. No offense taken or intended just happened to notice that.

  11. ahab

    ahab GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    @emptc12

    I agree with Godfreydaniel and GreggW, please visit more often as you are one of the rare-kind- birds sir.

  12. emptc12

    emptc12 said, about 1 year ago

    @mskemple

    Works by Longfellow, Riley, and Whittier were being phased out of school classrooms when I attended. My older teachers, however, still doted on them and we had to hear them. In fact, each of the elementary schools in my hometown was named after famous poets: Emerson, Riley, Whittier, Lowell, Longfellow, Sandburg, and other famous Americans around the turn of the twentieth century.
    .
    For a frivolous reason, last week I re-read “The Barefoot Boy,” by Whittier. It was a well-known poem that schoolboys inevitably mocked, and that’s what I had meant to do. The first stanza is:
    .
    “Blessings on thee, little man,
    Barefoot boy, with cheek of tan!
    With thy turned-up pantaloons,
    And thy merry whistled tunes;
    With thy red lip, redder still
    Kissed by strawberries on the hill;
    With the sunshine on thy face,
    Through thy torn brim’s jaunty grace;
    From my heart I give thee joy, -
    I was once a barefoot boy!
    Prince thou art, – the grown-up man
    Only is republican.
    Let the million-dollared ride!
    Barefoot, trudging at his side,
    Thou hast more than he can buy
    In the reach of ear and eye, -
    Outward sunshine, inward joy:
    Blessings on thee, barefoot boy!…”
    .
    Note lines 11-18. Interesting, that a “republican” was viewed a certain way in 1856, apparently as something you grew up into, leaving the fun of childhood behind. Was a republican then comparable to a Republican today, or was one he just a serious businessman or professional?
    .
    It’s fun to read and re-read and serendipitously find items connected with things you’re currently thinking about, or to find different meanings to what you read long ago. Sydney J. Harris, a Chicago columnist, made it an occasional feature of his column, “Strictly Personal” to list “Things I Learned While Looking Up Other Things.”
    .
    Perhaps unfortunately, that’s the way I read and thus have not ever put my “font of useless knowledge” to much practical use. It’s entertaining, though, and my personal weapon against Life’s absurdities.
    .
    Thanks for your time.

  13. charliekane

    charliekane said, about 1 year ago

    @Mike Rossi

    Of course you are correct. I guess I typed an impression before completing the thought.

    Shudda said:

    Reminiscent of Road Runner cartoons, the villain sets the trap himself, and then falls victim to it.

    Darnnit. An’ here I was thinkin’ I was infallible.
    -
    ;^)

  14. sdut sucks

    sdut sucks said, about 1 year ago

    @BillH77

    Read a book and find out who ran up most of this debt. It wasn’t Obama. I would just tell you, but I don’t want you to miss out on the excitement of discovery.

  15. TXPAScot

    TXPAScot said, about 1 year ago

    O.K., something new, please…

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