Joe Heller by Joe Heller

Joe Heller

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  1. ConserveGov

    ConserveGov said, 11 months ago

    Cool sketch.

  2. Uncle Joe

    Uncle Joe GoComics PRO Member said, 11 months ago

    @ConserveGov

    Hey, how about that? We agree!

    Mandela’s influence in his home nation cannot be overstated. His global legacy will be enduring.

  3. omQ Release the Desaparecidos

    omQ Release the Desaparecidos said, 11 months ago

    If you look more closely, the etchings are made up of his prisoner number 46664.

  4. omQ Release the Desaparecidos

    omQ Release the Desaparecidos said, 11 months ago

    @Uncle Joe

    said "Mandela’s influence in his home nation cannot be overstated. "


    Absolutely. I heard the sad news while I was driving home last night when the BBC interrupted its radio broadcast 10 to 12am UTC+2 to let us know.


    We’ve been expecting his passing for months but still we were unprepared.
    I had to pull over. I was that shocked. Odd that.


    I wasn’t expecting to feel this sad but I am.

  5. omQ Release the Desaparecidos

    omQ Release the Desaparecidos said, 11 months ago

    @Genome Project

    The speed at which ready edited tributes came out minutes after his death announcement means many were indeed prepared!


    I think many South Africans were/are simply in a state of denial. I guess a normal reaction and a part of grief?

  6. MortyForTyrant

    MortyForTyrant said, 11 months ago

    I wonder if they assigned him that number on purpose, having the “number of the beast” in the middle and therefor labeling him as the Antichrist to those who believe in this kind of thing. Well, no matter what number, he was a great man and will not be forgotten in a hurry!

  7. omQ Release the Desaparecidos

    omQ Release the Desaparecidos said, 11 months ago

    @MortyForTyrant

    asked a minute ago : " I wonder if they assigned him that number on purpose, having the “number of the beast” "


    Good question but Nah, happy coincidence for the Nats; I understand he was the 466th prisoner to arrive in Robben Island prison in 1964.

  8. dtroutma

    dtroutma GoComics PRO Member said, 11 months ago

    True freedom requires courage, which Mandela had. We in this country need more to follow his example.

  9. Enoki

    Enoki said, 11 months ago

    @Uncle Joe

    “Mandela’s influence in his home nation cannot be overstated. His global legacy will be enduring.”
    .
    But his success at improving the lives of South Africans and that nation as a whole can easily be.

  10. lonecat

    lonecat said, 11 months ago

    I know what you mean. I have similar feelings about Dr. King. By no mans a perfect human being, but all in all, what can one say. Some people manage to reach beyond.

  11. omQ Release the Desaparecidos

    omQ Release the Desaparecidos said, 11 months ago

    @DrCanuck

    One last comment before I head off as I had promised Martens.


    I surprised myself. I didn’t think I’d have rose-tinted glasses with regards Mandela.
    I was exposed to the propaganda of the Nats for years yet I’m well aware of what he did and didn’t do, the myths, the grey areas, the faults, the real accomplishments.
    But I really liked the guy.

  12. Uncle Joe

    Uncle Joe GoComics PRO Member said, 11 months ago

    @Enoki

    “But his success at improving the lives of South Africans and that nation as a whole can easily be.”

    On the economic side, Mandela was left with a nearly impossible situation. While in office, he made no one very happy. If one side was made happy, the other would have turned to violence. My belief is that South Africa would have turned into a bloodbath without Mandela’s leadership.

    Maybe omQ R can add more.

  13. ConserveGov

    ConserveGov said, 11 months ago

    I can add a whole lot more about how his socialist policies (much like O) harmed the economic growth of his country.
    BUT it is way too soon after his death to point out flaws. We all have them and now isn’t the time.
    He was a great leader of his people and changed the worlds view on apartheid.

  14. Baslim the beggar says, "Vanished is not vanquished."

    Baslim the beggar says, "Vanished is not vanquished." GoComics PRO Member said, 11 months ago

    Excellent artwork!

  15. omQ Release the Desaparecidos

    omQ Release the Desaparecidos said, 11 months ago

    @Uncle Joe

    Just about everyone’s expectation in 1994 was that a bloodbath was coming.


    The Portuguese government at the time, with approx. 600 000 ex-pats in SA, and heavily criticised for mismanaging the evacuation of Portuguese ex-pats in the then Zaire (now D.R.Congo) as it went thru’ upheaval in ‘91, – which numbered only a few thousand and were rescued by Belgians – set up army camps to accommodate up to 50 000 returning refugee ex-pats from SA. Also, after the ’74 revolution, 500 000 former colonists returned to Portugal – os Retornados. It was economic chaos on top of political upheaval. The Portuguese government was seriously concerned how much havoc a new wave of retornados could cause in a population of a mere 10 million. By the way, one of the reasons for Portugal and Great Britain dragging their heels for imposing tougher sanctions against SA was that both countries had large ex-pat communities in SA. The U.K. had about a million British in SA at the time. Neither country wanted hundreds of thousands of ex-pats suddenly turning up back on its shores.


    At the time many Portuguese ex-pats sent their kids to family in Portugal. Suddenly there was an influx of South African accents heard in Portugal.


    But it turned out to be unnecessary.
    The expectation by all was that civil war would erupt. I personally thought it an exaggeration but I was already sitting pretty in Portugal since ’87.
    After the first free elections, and after noting there was no sudden exodus of terrified whites, ex-pats or not, I accepted my eldest brother’s invitation to return to SA in ‘95. He alone in my family had not left SA between ’86 & ’88. [he wasn’t called up by the military and didn’t need to leave the country, but that’s another story]


    6 months after my arrival, I was caught up in the initial euphoria of a new nation and convinced my younger brother to join me. A year later, our youngest brother joined us.


    There is much, much more to tell.
    Especially why we started to leave by ‘99 and finally my youngest & eldest brothers also left SA in 2000.


    However, Mandela’s legacy of reconciliation is very real. It really made a difference. That cannot be overstated. His role, and hugely important role, was that of reconciliation. A uniter. THAT is what he is loved for. You had to have watched the Truth & Reconciliation sessions, chaired by Desmond Tutu, to understand what he accomplished (but I’m not negating a sense of injustice felt by some because of the forgiveness shown).


    He was universally loved by all, even liked by die-hard racist jerks. His ability to unite was unique. Well, I hope not unique, another real leader is needed in SA. Zuma is no Mandela and I don’t see a credible uniting leader coming up within the ANC ranks.


    I’m under no illusions. SA is in real need of a new leader. The Rainbow nation is under pressure again. No, that isn’t a “dire” warning that the county is about to collapse but Mandela’s ideals of a reconciled & united country is under threat. I’ve removed several more paragraphs, this post is long as it is and mostly personal anecdotes.

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