Jeff Danziger by Jeff Danziger

Jeff Danziger

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  1. Michael wme

    Michael wme said, 8 months ago

    The Ukraine was fairly evenly split between the Westerners (who are mostly unOrthodox Christians who prefer languages other than Russian and who want to be part of the EU, and their leaders have been promised good baksheesh to hand all the Ukrainian resources over to the Western bankers) and the Easterners who are mostly Russian Orthodox Russian speakers who prefer to be very loosely allied with (but not part of) Russia (they still remember that Stalin starved all Ukrainians, including the ethnic Russians in the Ukraine).


    Lopping off the Crimea meant the Westerners are now a clear majority. Lopping off the Eastern bit of the Ukraine will leave a unified, strongly pro-Western country on Russia’s border.


    What, exactly, is running through Putin’s mind is NOT clear. What the US cartoonists have in mind is quite clear: convincing their audience that Putin is worse than Hitler, and Obama had better act before he turns out to be worse than Chamberlain.

  2. Rad-ish

    Rad-ish GoComics PRO Member said, 8 months ago

    Putin’s trying to rebuild mother Russia, Frankenstein style.

  3. Uncle Joe

    Uncle Joe GoComics PRO Member said, 8 months ago

    @Michael wme

    “What, exactly, is running through Putin’s mind is NOT clear.”

    The short term is clear: Putin did not want a stable, western looking Ukraine on his border. Putin’s been reacting to the fall of his lackey, Yanukovych by seizing the Crimea & de-stabilizing the rest of Ukraine.

    Putin’s end game is totally unclear. If he really hopes to re-establish the USSR, he seems to have not noticed the big changes in the world since 1992. Germany is united & can become a major military power again if they feel threatened. Which they would if Putin makes a move on the Baltics.

    China has emerged as the second most powerful player on the world stage. Communism failed to bind China & Russia before. The Chinese have no trust whatsoever in Russia, now.

    Putin’s goal to make Russia an exporter of raw materials seems like a certain path to status as a second tier nation. The USSR couldn’t thrive in it’s own sphere of isolation. Putin’s “Greater Russia” has even less of a chance.

    Pessimistically speaking, the only question is whether it will require a major war to make the Russian people realize they are not being led into a promising future. Putin does not enjoy the monopoly on information that his Soviet predecessors had. He’s as vulnerable to public opinion as any American President.

  4. emptc12

    emptc12 said, 8 months ago

    @Uncle Joe

    Thanks for your great comment. That’s my opinion as well.
    .
    If Russia and China are no longer to be called Communist, what do we call them? Autocratic Oligarchical Capitalist? Are Marx and Lenin still taught as relevant or merely historic? I’d really be interested to know.
    .
    As long as Russia can exploit the political power from its energy resources, it will continue this newest surge of militarism.

  5. Edward Tripp

    Edward Tripp GoComics PRO Member said, 8 months ago

    @Uncle Joe

    Please notice that “a stable, western looking Ukraine” means a NATO presence on Russia’s border. Not good for Putin since there is no rationale for NATO to even exist. All that the takeover of Ukraine by the Europeans accomplishes is an enlargement of financial powers and an increase in military interests. Putin’s problem is how to counter this putsch.

  6. Edward Tripp

    Edward Tripp GoComics PRO Member said, 8 months ago

    Danziger’s cartoon is unfortunately jingoistic and based on misinformation!

  7. Gypsy8

    Gypsy8 said, 8 months ago

    You have to wonder why this isn’t a European issue sorted out by Europeans. Seems America’s involvement in this complex issue is less about domestic security and more about who’s the big dog in the world.
    .
    Then when you see the right baiting Obama by questioning his manhood, you have to wonder if it’s all about domestic politics.

  8. SABRSteve

    SABRSteve said, 8 months ago

    @Gypsy8

    Obama is too busy playing the race card to care about foreign policy.

  9. pirate227

    pirate227 said, 8 months ago

    @Gypsy8

    The right would love to get Obama into a costly war. Notice they cheer Putin’s “leadership” while complaining Obama hasn’t invaded yet.

    And it is a European problem but, Europe is dependent on Russian gas and their combined military might is not a real threat to Russia.

  10. emptc12

    emptc12 said, 8 months ago

    It is sometimes necessary to handle conflicts to avoid wars. We are presently conflicting with Russia in its long-range plans to dominate once again its area of Asia.
    .
    We should soon decide if we need to convince Russia to cooperate with us against the Chinese. So far, we’ve gone it alone with Iraq and Afghanistan, with failed results. We have badly dissipated our strength and good will among countries in that area of the world. Massive shows of strength as those seem to no longer be the effective style among the most powerful nations.
    .
    The truth is we are in contention with Russia and China for natural resources within Asia. Asia is not a barren wasteland to be neglected. In the far north are petroleum resources to be explored and in central Asia are valuable mineral deposits. China is purposefully expanding its influence to monopolize the world supply of minerals that are important to future communications and electronics.
    .
    The electronics in our cell phones, security communications, and weapon systems depend on certain rare earths. Supplies of these elements are said to be dwindling in supply within the U.S. sphere of influence. They are being found in Asia and Africa, and the Chinese know this and so does Russia.
    .
    Putin is presently using money from oil and gas reserves to intimidate his customers and regain power among his former satellite nations. Europe must decide if Ukraine is important enough to jeopardize its supply of Russian energy resources. Georgia was a test we failed. Ukraine is another test, and we are presently being judged.
    .
    I think domestic security of any nation depends increasingly on economic factors. This has certainly been the basis of warfare ever since wars began, but it usually involved destruction and slaughter. These days, among the more powerful nations, it has sublimated into diplomatic war games played directly or indirectly.
    .
    Purely abstract strategic intimidation is what I’m sure Putin would prefer to wage, with vague threats of destruction . Western nations shy from destruction to themselves, so destruction is now done on battlegrounds other than the homelands of the major powers. The populations of those strategic countries are the ones that suffer through death or dislocation..
    .
    I don’t think the elite of either China or Russia believe they are behaving this way for ideological purposes, anymore. Ideology might be the shell, nationalism the engine – and economic domination the goal. Fervent patriots are the pawns, while the cynical instigators of conflict take the benefit for themselves.
    .
    Growth in consumer communication products are presently the impetus to our economy. If we no longer have easy access to the materials for those products, our economy will suffer badly. It is sometimes necessary to handle conflicts well in the beginning to avoid wars later. We should decide if that time is now, or let things get worse.
    .
    http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2011/06/rare-earth-elements/folger-text
    http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/09/10/us-russia-rareearth-china-idUSBRE9890EI20130910
    http://www.cprm.gov.br/33IGC/1342225.html
    http://rt.com/business/production-china-rare-metals-402/

  11. mrs1wing

    mrs1wing GoComics PRO Member said, 8 months ago

    @Condoreggs

    Shades of “Cloud Atlas”!

  12. Gypsy8

    Gypsy8 said, 8 months ago

    The U.S. is the dominant power in North America and we all seem to live in relative harmony, give or take a Cuba. If Russia was the dominant power in Eur-Asia, would that be a problem? I continue to think the U.S.’s concern is about who is the big dog in international politics.

  13. Uncle Joe

    Uncle Joe GoComics PRO Member said, 8 months ago

    @emptc12

    “The truth is we are in contention with Russia and China for natural resources within Asia.”

    China & Russia might be in contention for Asia’s resources, but the US is in no way, shape or form a direct player. Russia has an abundance of pretty much every raw material, while China is incredibly dependent on other countries for many materials, especially fossil fuels.

    “Growth in consumer communication products are presently the impetus to our economy.”

    I’d say China is just as dependent on our appetite for gadgetry for the economic well being, though the EU has replaced the US as China’s largest trade partner. Russia is also heavily dependent on income from gas & oil supplied to Europe & China.

    Your links to articles about China’s near monopoly on rare earths production misses some fundamental points. The rare earths are not quite so rare as their name suggests. Many countries have rich deposits, including the US. We could supply all of our need through local production. The reason we stopped doing so, is that rare earth mining is not as lucrative as you might think. It’s incredibly damaging to the environment.

    Mining the rare earths is a smaller problem than rebuilding the capacity to process & manufacture with those materials. But China has a definite limit to how much they can exert that leverage before we rebuild that capacity.

  14. emptc12

    emptc12 said, 8 months ago

    @Uncle Joe

    Thanks for your thoughtful comment.
    .
    So Russia has to sell its resources; China has to import coal; and the U.S. has what it needs but to extract it is expensive and causes damage to ecological systems.
    .
    Stalemate, for now? Maybe that’s a good thing. But how does Africa fit? And deep sea vent mining? War for control of the ocean floor: I can see it now — 20,000 Legions Under the Sea.
    .
    Looking further ahead, I am very pessimistic.
    People in the West seem mired in Weltschmerz and ennui. Naturally — after the disasters in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria.
    .
    And so the current attitude about Russia and Ukraine reminds me of the phrase William Shirer used to describe the French attitude toward German threats to their sovereignty: Je m’en fous. To paraphrase his conclusion: This leads to the sort of defeatist, anarchistic je m’en fousism which will make things so much harder to correct later.
    .
    My opinions are not necessarily the correct ones.

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