Jeff Danziger by Jeff Danziger

Jeff Danziger

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  1. The Wolf In Your Midst

    The Wolf In Your Midst GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    The United States stands for freedom and democracy around the world… so long as we get to run it.

  2. emptc12

    emptc12 said, about 1 year ago

    This publication of government secrets fad could get out of control. It’s seen as noble and cool to younger people, apparently. Those of us older may know a little better, that intelligence agencies serve a basic and useful purpose although it isn’t always savory to the average citizen. Many of us see the world safely and naively through various media window screens.
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    Not everybody else in the world thinks well of honest and open government (such as it is), and many of our world competitors would like to humiliate the U.S. to lessen its political influence for financial gain. Knowledge is power and latent wealth, and so is raw information all mixed together without analysis. If foreign interests have that information, they could use it against us in unforeseen ways. Of course, the same could be said of domestic interests who might use it wrongly.
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    But who are these non-elected amateurs to judge? So what happens if they convince certain legislators to let down our guards? As related by Strabo and repeated by Carl Sagan in PALE BLUE DOT, the people of Kamarina in the Fifth Century B.C. drained their swamps to end an epidemic. However, they ignored the fact that the swamps protected them from enemies. The Carthaginians invaded over the dry land, razed the city, and killed every inhabitant. Compare that with those who want to unilaterally weaken our intelligence gathering capabilities toward other governments or even do away with them entirely.
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    Whistle-blowers at the city and state level – fine. But when somebody divulges U.S. government or technological secrets, even intending well, he is taking a chance with real lives. People in the military and business research know this. Life isn’t a video game in which the digital characters can be reset.
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    More and more, the U.S. is becoming a laughingstock for people we helped decades ago. In the past, we helped saved their governments and cultures – but now it’s like, Dude, what have you done for us lately? Once you acquire things, you help people get things of their own – you don’t give all of your things to them or all the capability to make more of them. That’s the real world. It’s not selfish or Imperialistic – it’s realistic. Some of our citizens seem to think that patriotism is passé, that international interests are inevitable and eventually benign,(as in the old Coke commercial with “I’d Like to Teach the World to Sing”).
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    Having applauded the release of The Pentagon Papers years ago, and the Watergate hearings, and publication of the Nixon tapes, as well as various media muckraking exposes, I never thought I would think this way. But there are distinctions to be made, and realistic self-interest concerns. And I keep thinking of the Kamarinians who did the right thing but lost their culture and lives, anyway.

  3. spyderred

    spyderred GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    Expresses it exactly! Remember Spain stopping the plane of a president of a South American country for “inspection” because Mr. Snowden might have been on board? That kind of idiocy could only come from a US government spy agency.

  4. motivemagus

    motivemagus said, about 1 year ago

    @emptc12

    Given that the American public was not being told about their own government SPYING on them — something that has been consistently illegal — it seems to me that you are being unduly generous. It reminds me of a very old Vietnam-era cartoon where the American people weren’t told about the Cambodian bombing — but the Cambodians sure knew.
    We need whistleblowers. You can argue whether they are doing it the right way or revealing things that should not be revealed, but knowing about the NSA surveillance of American citizens is ABSOLUTELY justified.

  5. emptc12

    emptc12 said, about 1 year ago

    @motivemagus

    Thanks for your comment. I dispute that the definition of “Whistle-blower” applies to Snowden and Manning, although I hesitate to call them traitors. The amount of damage or good they have done remains to be seen. Maybe your view will prevail.
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    Manning has honorably stood in judgment of what he has done, and even if he initially is sentenced for a long period I would bet his time is lessened after a few years or that he is even pardoned.
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    Snowden, on the other hand, did everything the wrong way as far as I’m concerned. Run to China, then Russia? The word “enemy” is not obsolete, and they each fit the definition. Why do young people, including my son, consider him heroic? The factors that make the Internet so fun and convenient arise from snooping and borderline if not outright invasion of privacy by an ordinary, non-legal, ethical definition.
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    Or maybe all this is a red herring? I suspect the real powers that rule us, international in scope make no doubt, play with our perceptions in these matters. Business snooping through the Internet dwarfs that done by the NSA. Government has always been a subset of Business.
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    If one refers to a relevant Orwell book in this regard, the more appropriate one would be a blend of ANIMAL FARM and 1984: Big Business and Big Government hand in hand. We buy our own telescreens and keep them ourselves, put our activities down to the most putrid detail in Facebook, et al. We give up our privacy and call it freedom. Then we complain we have no privacy. Talk about Doublethink.
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    We need a national discussion on this, for sure, but first stop the incessant leaks of U.S. information. Or have leaks of Chinese and Russian information as well. Let’s see if “whistle-blowers” from those countries are so glamorized as ours. Much of the world probably thinks we’re crazy to have so much trust and so little necessary self-interest in these things.
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    I wish I had time to have written this better. I’m not sure I made my points clearly. Thanks again for your comment.

  6. Hawthorne

    Hawthorne said, about 1 year ago

    @emptc12

    “Having applauded the release of The Pentagon Papers years ago, and the Watergate hearings, and publication of the Nixon tapes, as well as various media muckraking exposes, I never thought I would think this way. But there are distinctions to be made, and realistic self-interest concerns. And I keep thinking of the Kamarinians who did the right thing but lost their culture and lives, anyway.”

    Sounds like you are among those who are capable of learning through observation and experience.

    I have arrived at similar conclusions, over time. You write them better than I do! Thank you!

  7. Hawthorne

    Hawthorne said, about 1 year ago

    @emptc12

    “I wish I had time to have written this better. I’m not sure I made my points clearly. Thanks again for your comment.”

    I thought you were pretty clear. I didn’t see any absolutes in your thinking – just a judicious weighing of the possible outcomes. Maybe you’ve missed some, or got some wrong, but you are looking at real options.

    I’m still waiting for someone to explain to me why it is considered so economically sound and positive to prop up China’s economy at the expense of our own.

    I’d call that reckless, but maybe I’m missing something ..?

  8. Donald Williams

    Donald Williams said, about 1 year ago

    I suppose it’s time to repeal the 4th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.
    Emoticon

  9. Wabbit

    Wabbit GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    @emptc12

    Read " the shock Doctrine" by Naomi Klein. It opend my eyes to what has been going on with the CIA from the 1940’s.
    We overthrew democratic leaders and put dictators in place, noteably in Chile, Argentina and Brazil and learned how to torture most effectively from the Nazis.
    Our story is quite sordid..

  10. kevin87031

    kevin87031 said, about 1 year ago

    I contend that SHOCK DOCTRINE is the most important book I’ve read this century.

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