Frazz by Jef Mallett

Frazz

Comments (22) (Please sign in to comment)

  1. Arianne

    Arianne said, over 2 years ago

    “This is the mystery of the quotient…” ~ Led Zeppelin

  2. KasparV

    KasparV said, over 2 years ago

    Insanity is doing the same thing over and over, expecting different results.

  3. TheWildSow

    TheWildSow said, over 2 years ago

    @KasparV

    Rebuttal to that:
    a) Practice makes Perfect
    b) If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again
    or
    c) If at first you don’t fricassee, fry, fry a hen!

  4. Varnes

    Varnes said, over 2 years ago

    Her number’s up!

  5. puddleglum1066

    puddleglum1066 said, over 2 years ago

    Mrs. Olsen could observe that being able to divide two numbers just might turn out to be a lot less “pointless” than making it to the far end of the pool before the other guy.

  6. T_Lexi

    T_Lexi said, over 2 years ago

    Well… If there’s a hungry shark in the pool, you’d want to make it to the far end before it divided you into bite-sized pieces…

  7. OotenAboot

    OotenAboot said, over 2 years ago

    @ailurophile17
    ‘Or as W.C. Fields was wont to say, “If at first you don’t succeed, give up. There’s no use making a damn fool of yourself.”’

    WCF got into show business as a juggler. I doubt that he took that advice himself.

  8. catzilla23

    catzilla23 GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    “if at first you don’t succeed, don’t try skydiving”

  9. annieb1012

    annieb1012 said, over 2 years ago

    @Sharuniboy

    “Just ask a generation of those caught in that experiement how well it can balance its checkbooks, even after shifting over to simple drills.”


    I wonder how many of them do anything at all with their checkbooks! They’re too busy for that old-school stuff, preferring to use debit cards (without recording anything) and check their accounts online. Of course, you’re talking about a generation back, and I’m thinking of the kids I know now. My college student was in elementary school in the 90s, and she got a pretty standard version of arithmetic at her ultraconservative Core Knowledge charter school. Wasn’t the “new math” a 70s thing? Maybe 80s? When I was a kid in the 50s, we memorized “math facts,” and I can still compute some things faster in my head than my daughter can on her high-tech calculator.

  10. comicsssfan

    comicsssfan said, over 2 years ago

    Caufield just has to spend more time with the numbers to gain facility with them. It happens naturally when you go into the higher levels of math. Same thing with swimming.

  11. Redkaycei Repoc

    Redkaycei Repoc said, over 2 years ago

    @annieb1012

    The new math came in the early 60’s. I was first exposed in 6th grade in 1963.

  12. Night-Gaunt49

    Night-Gaunt49 GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    @comicsssfan

    I don’t think Caufield has a problem with math. He may have already reached the limit and is now bored.

  13. K M

    K M GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    More to the point, how long has she been teaching Caulfield!? Is that kid determined to stay in the 6th grade (or whatever) for the rest of his life?

  14. K M

    K M GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    @TheWildSow

    As Cal Ripken, Sr. is known to have said, practice does not make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect!

  15. annieb1012

    annieb1012 said, over 2 years ago

    @Redkaycei

    And in 1963 I was in the 9th. Missed it altogether. So the “new math” is actually quite a bit older than I thought! How widespread was it? When I first heard about it, I had the impression it was sort of a west coast thing. Writing poems about “4,” and all that. Come to think of it, that particular bit might have been just a California phenomenon. Whatever the new math is, I missed it by a few years, but maybe by geography, too, eh?

  16. Load the rest of the comments (7).