The Other Coast by Adrian Raeside

The Other Coast

Comments (9) (Please sign in to comment)

  1. runar

    runar said, about 3 years ago

    At one time the moon was closer. Every year, its distance increases another 3.78cm.

  2. mesachie

    mesachie said, about 3 years ago

    Yeah, but did it make the roasts fly off the table tops? ;-)

  3. Wolf Emperor

    Wolf Emperor GoComics PRO Member said, about 3 years ago

    The moon is currently in a distancing phase, but it goes in and out. Sky & Telescope magazine says that in the year 2257, the perigee of the moon will be 356,371 km, much CLOSER than the moon is this year in its perigee (356,964 km on May 6, 2012).

  4. runar

    runar said, about 3 years ago

    @mesachie

    I don’t remember – that was a long time ago, and we probably only had rocks to eat then.

    I did some rough calculations, and figured out that in my lifetime, the moon has moved slightly more than my height away from the Earth.

  5. runar

    runar said, about 3 years ago

    Besides – if the roast got lifted into the air, wouldn’t that make it farther away from the dog?

  6. pschearer

    pschearer GoComics PRO Member said, about 3 years ago

    If some TV documentary is to be believed, the moon was once about 1/3 the distance away, causing mountain-high tides that swept across entire continents, dissolving out the salt from the land into the ocean.


    OK, I can buy that. What I don’t buy is the idea that some random Mars-sized body hit the earth to create the moon. Without an explanation of the origin and fate of that body, it just sounds like crazy Velikovsky again. (He’s the guy who tried to misuse several sciences to try to prove that Old Testament miracles were literally true.)

  7. SCAATY_423

    SCAATY_423 GoComics PRO Member said, about 3 years ago

    @pschearer

    Velikovsky aside, a collision between a Mars-size object and the proto-Earth is the currently leading theory, and a lot of improbable things can happen in a billion years’ time — especially when everything is orbiting in roughly the same plane. It’s plausible enough. That being said, the latest evidence argues against it…and the origin of the moon is still, you could say, up in the air.

  8. Gee Man

    Gee Man GoComics PRO Member said, about 3 years ago

    @pschearer

    The fate of the hypothesized Mars-sized body that struck the proto-Earth is for both planetary bodies to be substantially shattered and melted. Huge volumes of molten and vaporized would be thrown up from the impact, most of it remaining in orbit. The debris field would then then re-accrete around the largest fragments (or largest concentrations of fragments), ultimately forming the Moon. Both objects are thus still here – the Earth and Moon are the largely mixed results, so to speak, of that collision event. As far as the origin of both bodies (proto-Earth and Theia), both would themselves be the result of accretion of smaller bodies in the early solar system – essentally the gravity of the larger bodies vacuuming up the smaller ones.

  9. bmonk

    bmonk said, about 3 years ago

    @pschearer

    “What I don’t buy is the idea that some random Mars-sized body hit the earth to create the moon.”

    ++++

    Of course, in those days there were lots of big objects in more erratic orbits than today.

  10. Refresh Comments.