Scott Stantis by Scott Stantis

Scott Stantis

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  1. exoticdoc2

    exoticdoc2 said, 3 days ago

    It would be nice to have justice back instead of coddling the scummy criminals and forgetting the victims who were often subjected to horrific things.

  2. Jase99

    Jase99 GoComics PRO Member said, 3 days ago

    @exoticdoc2

    “It would be nice to have justice back instead of coddling the scummy criminals and forgetting the victims who were often subjected to horrific things.”

    I believe the word you’re looking for is Revenge. If we as a society must execute criminals, it should be done sparingly and with mercy. Not for the criminals’ sake, but for our own.

  3. Ted Lind

    Ted Lind GoComics PRO Member said, 3 days ago

    From a financial point of view, it is much more expensive to execute a criminal than it is to imprison them for the rest of their lives.

  4. ODon

    ODon said, 3 days ago

    @Ted Lind

    Doesn’t have to be. Not a statement in support.

  5. SizeofaPea

    SizeofaPea said, 3 days ago

    I can’t help but notice, those who argue most for killing those tehy deem less worthy are the very same who most vehemently oppose abortion. ’I’m Pro-Life!’ is their cry.
    .
    With recidivism rates high for some crimes I can understand why the death penalty is desirable. But with it being the most final of all punishments I believe it should only be meted out under circumstances where there is no doubt, absolutely none whatsoever, not just beyond reasonable doubt. Too many convicted people have later been proven, literally proven innocent who could have been murdered by the state in the name of its citizens. I do not want that blood on my hands. With the gross abuses of power by the judges and prosecutors, if we are going to murder someone for a crime they have been convicted of, we need to hold the judge and P.A. accountable too. If the person is later found to be not guilty or the evidence was withheld or tampered with, any prosecutorial misdeed that resulted in someone being put to death who should not have been, then the judge and the P.A. and anyone else responsible for the miscarriage of justice should also be put to death, for they would be guilty of murder, intentional and premeditated.
    .
    I am morally opposed to the death penalty as it is not justice, it is revenge and is often perpetrated on innocent men and women. Just because they have had a lengthy appeals process does not mean they weren’t mistreated or even granted justice. The higher courts almost unanimously revere the jury process as infallible and the judges and prosecutors as saints. It takes almost superhuman effort and nearly insurmountable evidence to prove a convicted person not guilty after minimal evidence resulted in a guilty verdict. Faulty forensic science, theatrical displays by gifted prosecutors, biased judges, indigent defendants, they all add up to innocent people being convicted.
    .
    I was just hearing on NPR recently a case of a man charged and convicted with ONE person’s eye-witness testimony when the victim (the convicted person) had 13 alibis, including a Deputy Sheriff from another jurisdiction and a priest among other highly credible people. But despite these alibi witnesses willing to testify that the victim was in another state, he was convicted because the courts refused to hear the alibi witnesses, including the appeals courts. What if the man was convicted in a state with the death penalty? THIRTEEN credible people willing to testify he was not where the courts said he was and he could still be murdered for the prosecutorial injustice. No, the death penalty is only for cases where it can be proven beyond ALL doubt.

  6. SizeofaPea

    SizeofaPea said, 3 days ago

    Just found this,
    NBC News 4 New York – Bronx Man Jailed for 18 Years Despite 13 Alibi Witnesses” “I turned myself in when I heard police were looking for me,” says Rosario, now 39. “I gave detectives everything they needed that first night to prove my innocence. They never investigated any of it.”
    Rosario is now serving the 18th year of a 25-to-life sentence for a 1996 Bronx murder, even though he insists he was 1,000 miles away in Florida on the day of the crime – and at least 13 alibi witnesses swear Rosario is telling the truth. Among the witnesses who can vouch for him are a sheriff’s deputy, a pastor, and a federal correctional officer.“
    What if this man had been sentenced to death? How would you resurrect him from his obviously wrongful prosecution and (murder) capital punishment?

  7. martens misses all her friends

    martens misses all her friends said, 3 days ago

    @SizeofaPea

    I am afraid that there are those who would rather that an innocent person be executed than that a guilty person live, even in prison.

  8. SizeofaPea

    SizeofaPea said, 3 days ago

    @martens misses all her friends

    And blackest are their hearts.

  9. dchavers

    dchavers said, 3 days ago

    @exoticdoc2

    How about the many people condemned to die, who later have their cases overturned because of mistakes made during the trial? Can’t bring them back after they’re dead can we?

  10. dzw3030

    dzw3030 said, 3 days ago

    @dchavers

    " the many people" How many compared to the victims? How many, compared to those victimized because plea deals let the career criminal back on the streets?

  11. The Wolf In Your Midst

    The Wolf In Your Midst said, 2 days ago

    @SizeofaPea

    People like ExoticDoc would say “Oh well” and not pay it another thought.

    They don’t care how many innocent people suffer to satisfy their bloodlust, so long it’s not them and theirs.

  12. The Wolf In Your Midst

    The Wolf In Your Midst said, 2 days ago

    Remember, the government is completely inept and can’t do anything right- unless it involves killing, in which case it is absolutely perfect and unerring.

  13. Jase99

    Jase99 GoComics PRO Member said, 2 days ago

    @dzw3030

    “How many compared to the victims? How many, compared to those victimized because plea deals let the career criminal back on the streets?”

    It sounds like you’re saying the fact that a victim suffered or was killed makes it OK to put people to death who are later to be discovered to be innocent. That’s not justice, it’s blind vengeance.

  14. dzw3030

    dzw3030 said, 2 days ago

    @Jase99

    Are you saying that the plea deal epidemic in this country is justice? Punishment should be certain and damned unpleasant and lately, in this country it has become uncertain and almost tolerable for repeat offenders. Ask the California cop’s widow. He was shot by an offender who’d been released after other violent felonies.

  15. s49nav

    s49nav said, 2 days ago

    @Ted Lind

    “Is”, but “Should not be”.

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