Rubes by Leigh Rubin

Rubes

Comments (10) (Please sign in to comment)

  1. cdward

    cdward said, over 1 year ago

    That was a unicorny joke.

  2. grahambhg

    grahambhg said, over 1 year ago

    Cloud Cuckoo Land, and directly related to Uni-Kitty.

  3. Digital Frog

    Digital Frog GoComics PRO Member said, over 1 year ago

  4. markjoseph125

    markjoseph125 GoComics PRO Member said, over 1 year ago

    Funny comic!

    But, you’re going to have the fighting fundies on your case; after all, the bible attests to the reality of unicorns in Numbers 23:22, 24:8; Deuteronomy 33:17, Job 39:9, 10; Psalms 22:21, 29:6, 92:10; Isaiah 34:7
    Of course, someone will then say that this is a bad translation, and it should be “narwhal” or “rhinoceros” or “oryx”, but then you’ll get a fight between the more fundy KJV-only crowd, and the less fundy “I like my fairy tales, but not too ridiculous” crowd.

  5. Bargrove

    Bargrove said, over 1 year ago

    Fantasy? In horny land?

  6. Karaboo2

    Karaboo2 said, over 1 year ago

    What? You expect him to be a slowpoke?

  7. bg_21

    bg_21 said, over 1 year ago

    Is that Sgt. Slaughter?!?

  8. Michael wme

    Michael wme said, over 1 year ago

    @markjoseph125

    The New King James, the Revised, and most of the newer translation all translate the word as ‘wild ox.’ For 1500 years, the Western Church used the Latin Bible, and it says "rinocerotis, which may be translated as unicorn or rhino (your choice).


    The early Christians (and the first Englishmen to translate the Bible into English) used the Greek LXX Old Testament, NOT the Hebrew (which they could not understand) and the LXX states that the creature was a ‘μονοκέρωτος’, which clearly has just one meaning, ‘unicorn.’ (The early Christians as well as the translator of the Authorised King James Version believed the LXX was a more reliable version of the Old Testament than the Hebrew; besides, the earliest Christians spoke two languages, their mother tongue and Greek, and neither of those were Hebrew or Aramaic).


    Of course, if one goes back to the Hebrew, the word is reem, and a reem looks like this:

  9. Chris Sherlock

    Chris Sherlock said, over 1 year ago

    He was running late for an appearance in “Heavenly Nostrils.”

  10. pinkx

    pinkx said, over 1 year ago

    I’ll bet he’s high on myth.

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