Rose is Rose by Don Wimmer and Pat Brady

Rose is Rose

Comments (17) (Please sign in to comment)

  1. Nabuquduriuzhur

    Nabuquduriuzhur said, over 3 years ago

    Don’t do it Peekaboo. There’s a reason that lizards and other critters don’t eat lightning bugs!

  2. rayannina

    rayannina said, over 3 years ago

    Yeah, stick with the tasty stuff — like dead mice.

  3. Ottodesu

    Ottodesu said, over 3 years ago

    I look forward to one day seeing one of these bugs that light up in the dark. Must have freaked out the first people who saw them.

  4. bdaverin

    bdaverin said, over 3 years ago

    I miss lightning bugs!

  5. LafInLarry

    LafInLarry GoComics PRO Member said, over 3 years ago

    @towerwarlock

    Yeah, Iive out in the country and it’s great this time of year. Somewhere I’ve got an old slide that’s a time exposure of lightning bugs on bushes at the edge of the yard. Like a starry night (but not THAT starry, starry night).

  6. Doug Dean

    Doug Dean said, over 3 years ago

    Actually, the kid’s got it dead on.

  7. JazzyBella

    JazzyBella GoComics PRO Member said, over 3 years ago

    Love Lightening Bugs! They are like twinkling little stars.

  8. Comic Lover

    Comic Lover GoComics PRO Member said, over 3 years ago

    my son always said that lightening bugs were fireworks for ants

  9. hippogriff

    hippogriff said, over 3 years ago

    Nabuquduriuzhur: Lizards do eat lightning bugs. Mediterranian geckos have become common in this region in the last few years. Moths are attracted to the window by the light inside. I saw a gecko (on the bare glass) eat a lightning bug and we could see the light flashing inside for several minutes after ingestion.

  10. dfowensby

    dfowensby said, over 3 years ago

    gross-out little girls lesson learned at age 6: catch a bunch of ’em, and you can smear their butts all over your face and get that frankenstein makeup effect!

  11. dfowensby

    dfowensby said, over 3 years ago

    ‘course, my step-mother wasn’t too cool about it either.

  12. Night-Gaunt49

    Night-Gaunt49 said, over 3 years ago

    As the Wild Kratts say, they come out for only two weeks to mate then lay eggs and the nymphs become ‘glow worms’ in the ground. The blinking is to alert the females to show they are ready and a good catch. The females sit on plants watching and signal when they see one they like.

  13. piloti

    piloti said, over 3 years ago

    @hippogriff

    But don’t you know that Nabuquduriuzhur is the final authority on all things in the known universe? If he so speaks, it truly must be so.

  14. pearlandpeach

    pearlandpeach said, over 3 years ago

    @bdaverin

    so do I. Tulsa had them every night.

  15. Nabuquduriuzhur

    Nabuquduriuzhur said, over 3 years ago

    Snort. Thanks piloti. You’ve not noticed the number of times i’ve retracted or corrected? If it matters, I meet OPM’s standards for 20 specialties from GS4 to GS13 equivalents from botany to engineering and I’ve worked for three different departments from engineering to endangered species. I’ve several degrees. That and dollar will get you a cup of coffee, I fear… Having had to change careers when Congress dumps 50,000+ people in a field makes for lots of fun, let me tell you. Or a senior agency cuts a budget by $4 million and your group is the one that goes… The third time reinventing, you hope it’s your last time. You stack the deck with degrees to make yourself more valuable. Going on, I didn’t know any reptile could survive their toxins. Native species like fence, skinks and such avoid them and when forced to eat them— don’t ask. biologists can be cruel— it’s not pretty. Same with cinnabar moths here in the west.

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