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  1. mafastore commented on Adam@Home about 1 month ago

    Major problem with e-readers – in a situation where there is no electricity – say on Long lsland after Sandy – for days and days, one runs out of juice to run the e-reader. Books work fine, no electricity required (alternate lighting available).

    Keurig’s new machines only work with licensed Keurig cups. It reads a coding on the cups. No brands that make "K"cups, no use the little plastic cup that lets you use any coffee – only “approved” cups (meaning those of companies that have paid Keurig) will work in the new machines.

  2. mafastore commented on The Buckets 3 months ago

    This strip is on the day after Christmas ends (1/6) so why did she take down the tree weeks ago? Christmas day was not even 2 weeks ago? It is now, as I write 1/12 and our tree is still up as it always is until the 3rd Monday in January, the day we set to start taking it down, actually take all 3 trees down. Yes, they are artificial trees, but they still shed needles and I always find them in the house, all year.

  3. mafastore commented on The Other Coast 3 months ago

    I thought that once radial tires came into being, there were no more snow tires. They don’t sell them around here.

  4. mafastore commented on The Buckets 4 months ago

    In England and her countries January 1 was new year’s day, but the year number did not change until March 25 (Lady Day). So March 24 1603, for example, was followed by March 25, 1604.

    The Catholic church changed from the Julian to the Gregorian calender in the 1500s. As the Anglican church kept it’s own calender it did not change at that time. In 1752 it changed to the Gregorian calender and also changed the time the year number changed to January 1. Dates before the change were marked with the letters O.S. after them as in old style. There was a 12 day difference in dates between the 2 calenders, so in Sept 1752 12 days disappeared for the one year from the calender. This involved many legal problems. Some people adjusted their birthdays, others did not. Geo Washington changed his birthday from February 10 O.S. to February 22, for example.

  5. mafastore commented on The Buckets 4 months ago

    In England and her countries January 1 was new year’s day, but the year number did not change until March 25 (Lady Day). So March 24 1603, for example, was followed by March 25, 1604.

    The Catholic church changed from the Julian to the Gregorian calender in the 1500s. As the Anglican church kept it’s own calender it did not change at that time. In 1752 it changed to the Gregorian calender and also changed the time the year number changed to January 1. Dates before the change were marked with the letters O.S. after them as in old style. There was a 12 day difference in dates between the 2 calenders, so in Sept 1752 12 days disappeared for the one year from the calender. This involved many legal problems. Some people adjusted their birthdays, others did not. Geo Washington changed his birthday from February 10 O.S. to February 22, for example.

  6. mafastore commented on The Buckets 4 months ago

    It is actually multiples of 12 as in the calender months. But the point is that it could be different and is not set by nature at 24 hours, 60 minutes an hour, 60 seconds a minute.

  7. mafastore commented on The Buckets 4 months ago

    Think about this – the winter solstice is the start of winter, it is also the shortest day of the year, and it is colder (supposedly) after it. Why is it not balanced so that it is as cold a month before (for example) the shortest day of the year as it is on a month after the shortest day.

    Why is midsummer day in June(the summer solstice) , when the middle of summer is at the end of July?

  8. mafastore commented on The Buckets 4 months ago

    I am an 18th century (USA) reenactor. Years, months, and days are set by nature. Everything else in time is set by man. This discussion confuses people at reenanctment events.

    Weeks have not meaning in nature. We could have 3 weeks of about 10 days to the month.

    Hours, minutes, seconds – we could have 20 hours of 100 minutes of 100 seconds a day – it has been decided to have 24/60/60.

    Early clocks only had hour hands. Later ones had hours and minutes, more recently seconds were added. When one did not have exacted planned meetings or a train to catch, less division was needed on clocks and watches.

    Now the capper – the time is incorrect in most places compared to the natural time. Huh? Prior to the invention of standard train time in the late 19th century each town clock was set to the time the sun was overhead as noon, home clocks (when people had them) and watches were set to same. As a result each location had a slightly different time. When trains started running they needed a standard time system and the countries were split into one hour time zones. So somewhere around the center of say, US eastern time at noon, it really is noon. On the eastern side of the time zone it is later, on the western side of the time zone it is earlier.

  9. mafastore commented on The Buckets 4 months ago

    The second day of Christmas is much too early to throw out the tree. Christmas lasts through January 6 (Epiphany) when was this forgotten?

  10. mafastore commented on Arlo and Janis 4 months ago

    Husband’s family has always had artificial trees so we have had same. We are on our 3rd tree (6.5ft, we have low ceilings) in 35 years. We do not get prelit trees (well, they started making them after we last bought a tree). Our tree is in 8 wedge shaped sections and a top section. Hang the wedges, adjust the branches, put on the top, ditto add lights – less than 45 minutes. Need a branch over there, move one of the branches. – Oh, and that is the main tree.

    We have a tabletop tree in our studio off the kitchen with all ornaments we have made (more of them on the main tree).

    Upstairs there is another table top tree in the middle of a teddy bear village that I have compiled over the years – all teddy decorations on the tree (and more on the main tree).

    We also have a beaded tree, about a foot tall. I made the tree and the decorations, but the decorations stay on from year to year.

    I have a small tree I made of foam sheets that is in a holiday figurine display.

    We may add another tree next year as we donate to a museum and get an ornament every year and there are enough for another tree.

    Our dining room is normally decorated to look like a colonial tavern. We decorate with greens as it would have been in period. Garland up the short banister of the stairs.

    Living room has a grouping of large santas and elves, most we were given as gifts when husband went out to work, some I made. Additional decorations around including hand embroidered (by me) stockings and (ditto) hanging.

    Outside lights, 2 wreaths (one each door) and electric candles in windows.

    All this and no one sees it but us. When there is nothing else to the holiday but the decorating, one decorates.