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  1. John W Kennedy GoComics Pro Member commented on Heavenly Nostrils about 19 hours ago

    In 1963–4, Major Lance had his biggest hit with “Um, Um, Um, Um, Um, Um”.

  2. John W Kennedy GoComics Pro Member commented on Ripley's Believe It or Not 3 days ago

    Christians used codices (singular: codex; meaning: the kind of book with pages fastened together at the edge) almost from the beginning. By the middle ages, no one was using scrolls in the west except Jews. But I don’t know about Arabs.

    It takes a lot less to verify that something is an OK translation than it does to create one. The one requires expertise in the source language and competence in the target language. The other requires expertise in both languages and literary talent, to boot.

  3. John W Kennedy GoComics Pro Member commented on Mutt & Jeff 3 days ago

    If you can actually remember silver half-dimes, you belong in the cast of “Gasoline Alley” as Walt’s grandfather.

  4. John W Kennedy GoComics Pro Member commented on Heavenly Nostrils 3 days ago

    Every gosh-darn day I spent in the tropics was overcast.

    Not only that, but it was actually a good deal cooler than it was in New Jersey that summer—not that that wasn’t welcome.

  5. John W Kennedy GoComics Pro Member commented on Gasoline Alley 3 days ago

    The way I learned it (about sixty years ago) was:
     
    Little red caboose -boose -boose -boose,
    Little red caboose -boose -boose -boose,
    Little red caboose behind the
    Train, train, train, train.
    Smokestack on its back, back, back, back,
    Comin’ down the track, track, track, track,
    Little red caboose behind the train.
     
    The original purpose of the caboose was to be a place for the brakeman to ride on a freight train, since a freight train had no passenger cars for them to ride in. It was basically a bedroom on wheels, with a little stove, etc.. The British equivalent (not altogether the same thing) is “Guard’s Van”.

  6. John W Kennedy GoComics Pro Member commented on Mutt & Jeff 4 days ago

    To anyone my age, Horn and Hardart’s line of Automats /was/ New York City. Part of what did them in was the rise in prices; it’s not so convenient to buy a sandwich with fifty dimes. So there’s really no point to bring it up to date. The Automats are gone, like dramatic and comedy radio, typewriters, rumble seats, world’s fairs, liveried elevator operators, and double features.

    It wasn’t all machinery. The back opened up directly to a real, live kitchen, and the food was kept fresh—New York is kinda particular about its restaurants, especially the ones that are popular with tourists, reporters, and businessmen.

  7. John W Kennedy GoComics Pro Member commented on Nothing is Not Something 5 days ago

    He’s quite right. The correct spelling is “þe”.

  8. John W Kennedy GoComics Pro Member commented on Heavenly Nostrils 6 days ago

    One is reminded of the constitution of Lilliput.

  9. John W Kennedy GoComics Pro Member commented on Heavenly Nostrils 29 days ago

    Sounds like a tromboon.

  10. John W Kennedy GoComics Pro Member commented on Luann 30 days ago

    Actually, most of the college stages I’ve seen have been smaller than most of the high school stages I’ve seen. (I live in the NJ suburbs of NYC.) The most awful example I can think of offhand is Minor Latham Theater at Barnard College, which doesn’t even have a left wing or any kind of access from backstage to stage left.

    High-school stages, though, almost never have usable fly space, and the one I went to had (and still has) the light board in one of the wings, 90% of the lighting coming from directly overhead, and the rest at about a 45º angle from a ceiling cove, though that’s been corrected somewhat since my time with a couple of ladders in the house.