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Heavenly Nostrils by Dana Simpson

Heavenly Nostrils

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  1. John W Kennedy GoComics Pro Member commented on Heavenly Nostrils 4 days ago

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zX5CXoIbPQk

  2. John W Kennedy GoComics Pro Member commented on Gasoline Alley 5 days ago

    Young Skeezix never really went through the “Girls have cooties” stage.

  3. John W Kennedy GoComics Pro Member commented on Dick Tracy 5 days ago

    It’s definitely a holster, but that doesn’t mean it’s a gun. It would mostly be a prop gun, for one thing. And I used to have a holster for my cellphone, and have a holster right now for my Swiss Army Knife.

    A chimera is also a case of twins that, at an early stage, merged into one another. One individual, but two sets of DNA, depending on where you look. Sometimes the mixture is clearly visible in the body, but sometimes it isn’t.

  4. John W Kennedy GoComics Pro Member commented on Gasoline Alley 7 days ago

    Yes, Walt’s mother was around.

  5. John W Kennedy GoComics Pro Member commented on Gasoline Alley 7 days ago

    Specifically, it’s Pal, little Skeezix’ dog. There is a sort of facial resemblance to Krazy Kat, I guess.

  6. John W Kennedy GoComics Pro Member commented on Gasoline Alley 8 days ago

    No, the famous doorstep moment was 1921-02-14, and this scene was 1922-02-14. And, yes, this is a simplified redrawing of the 1922-02-14 strip. In those days, the strip generally ran exactly one day per day, though that led to a lot of strips beginning, "Say, do you remember what we were talking about yesterday? Well, it just occurred to me that….”

  7. John W Kennedy GoComics Pro Member commented on Frazz 8 days ago

    The “-ough” words all rhymed once, though. And as recently in the mid-1700s you’ll find lower-class characters in novels who say “thruff”, as in “I had to go thruff the foreſt to come here, my lord.”

    “-gh” actually represents the old English letter ȝ (“yogh”), which was abolished several hundred years ago when pedants complained that it couldn’t be a real letter because it wasn’t used in Latin. In England, it was usually replaced with “y” or “gh”, but in Scotland it was sometimes replaced with “z”, where it is still found in Scottish names such as “Dalziel” and “Culzean”.

  8. John W Kennedy GoComics Pro Member commented on Heavenly Nostrils 9 days ago

    I can think of a few other things. “The Goon Show”. “The Prisoner”. William Shakespeare. The Inklings. The LEO, the Atlas, and the Acorn (which last lives on the ARM chips that drive virtually all hand-held computers today). Cadbury Flake and Cornish Cream and Scott’s Porage Oats. Guinness and Dorothy L. Sayers and Common Law and Harry Potter and The Corrs.

  9. John W Kennedy GoComics Pro Member commented on Gasoline Alley 9 days ago

    The original version had Doc’s, Bill’s, and Avery’s wives and children at the table, too. And, yes, Walt was chubbier and Rachel was less—umm—pallid. (Yeah, it’s Bill. He’s hard to recognize without his flat cap.) The strip was one long panel, so it was easier to get all those characters in.

  10. John W Kennedy GoComics Pro Member commented on Ripley's Believe It or Not 10 days ago

    There is one English word that rhymes with “orange”, “sporange”, a technical term in botany. In a pinch, you can also use “door hinge”.

    The color was also previously known as “tawny”, or, in heraldry, “tenné”.