Ollie and Quentin by Piers Baker

Ollie and Quentin

Comments (11) (Please sign in to comment)

  1. Bruno Zeigerts

    Bruno Zeigerts said, 12 months ago

    ‘Junior, they got us.’

  2. margueritem

    margueritem GoComics PRO Member said, 12 months ago

    Ouch!

  3. Citizen GROG!

    Citizen GROG! GoComics PRO Member said, 12 months ago

    I’m glad he didn’t have a gun.

  4. nemo5012

    nemo5012 said, 12 months ago

    @Bruno Zeigerts

    really like that movie

  5. Griffinjones

    Griffinjones said, 12 months ago

    I thought that stump was his missing head!!

  6. Dry and Dusty

    Dry and Dusty GoComics PRO Member said, 12 months ago

    Robin 1, Ollie and Quentin 0

  7. heatherjasper

    heatherjasper said, 12 months ago

    “Honey, I forgot to duck.”

  8. pcolli

    pcolli said, 12 months ago

    @heatherjasper

    I haven’t done any research but why does “duck” mean to lower ones head?

  9. NyukNyuk2000

    NyukNyuk2000 said, 12 months ago

    @nemo5012

    So do I. :D

  10. Tandembuzz

    Tandembuzz said, 12 months ago

    Sadly, Ollie is a gull, not a duck.

  11. Tandembuzz

    Tandembuzz said, 12 months ago

    @pcolli:
    duck (n.1) waterfowl, Old English duce (found only in genitive ducan) “a duck,” literally “a ducker,” presumed to be from Old English *ducan “to duck, dive” (see duck (v.)). Replaced Old English ened as the name for the bird, this being from PIE *aneti-, the root of the “duck” noun in most Indo-European languages.

    duck (v.) “to plunge into” (transitive), c.1300; to suddenly go under water (intransitive), mid-14c., from presumed Old English *ducan “to duck,” found only in derivative duce (n.) “duck” (but there are cognate words in other Germanic languages, e.g. Old High German tuhhan “to dip,” German tauchen “to dive,” Old Frisian duka, Middle Dutch duken “to dip, dive,” Dutch duiken), from Proto-Germanic *dukjan.

    Sense of “bend, stoop quickly” is first recorded in English 1520s. Related: Ducked; ducking. The noun is attested from 1550s in the sense of “quick stoop;” meaning “a plunge, dip” is from 1843.

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