Dick Tracy by Joe Staton and Mike Curtis

Dick Tracy

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  1. cpalmeresq

    cpalmeresq said, almost 2 years ago

    Good for George Takai to lend his support to this story!

  2. 60sFan

    60sFan said, almost 2 years ago

    Now we’re getting down to the nitty gritty…

  3. margueritem

    margueritem GoComics PRO Member said, almost 2 years ago

    I await the next panel.

  4. Mikeyj

    Mikeyj said, almost 2 years ago

    Being land-locked like that must have been difficult for people from the coast, who’s families had mainly been fishermen for generations (At least that was the case of the Momiji** (Japanese Canadians)) ** Momiji is the name for what we call the Japanese Maple! Seeing as the symbol of Canada is the maple leaf, Canadians of Japanese descent use Momiji to describe themselves

  5. Sisyphos

    Sisyphos said, almost 2 years ago

    The account of the camp begins. Where will it lead? How will it end?

  6. NightShade09

    NightShade09 said, almost 2 years ago

    @Mikeyj

    Thanks for the info, Mikeyj!
    When I was small, my grandfather would tell me about his childhood in Halifax; I guess that explains a homing instinct I have to go north.

  7. NightShade09

    NightShade09 said, almost 2 years ago

    Compliments to all of Team Tracy and George Takei for tackling a subject most Americans have never heard of (and some wouldn’t believe possible).
    Using it as the setting for a murder mystery is a great painless way to teach US history. (And yes, I know, a number of people have been saying the villain is a pedophile – as may be – but right now, Tracy is working on a murer case.)

  8. John Russell

    John Russell GoComics PRO Member said, almost 2 years ago

    @margueritem

    the same here.

  9. Willy007

    Willy007 said, almost 2 years ago

    Still hard to believe this happened in America. I know it did, of course, but just to think, President Roosevelt actually issued an Executive Order to round up American citizens and put them in detention camps. Even J. Edgar Hoover opposed the action. It was nothing less than an act of tyranny.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executive_Order_9066

  10. Mikeyj

    Mikeyj said, almost 2 years ago

    You’re replying to morrow’s comment:

    Today isn’t too far removed from then. Today, they’d round up the Conservatives. Except you’d see huge smokestacks
    ^
    ^
    Comments like this will get your name changed to Moron; I mean, really, what WERE you thinking?

  11. ✯✯ VistaBill ✯✯

    ✯✯ VistaBill ✯✯ GoComics PRO Member said, almost 2 years ago

    Good morning everyone…

  12. Mikeyj

    Mikeyj said, almost 2 years ago

    @Willy007

    President Roosevelt actually issued an Executive Order to round up American citizens and put them in detention camps. Even J. Edgar Hoover opposed the action.
    ^
    ^
    I was really surprised that Hoover opposed this, he was such a huge bigot; but, it makes sense in that it made the FBI look as if they couldn’t handle the situation themselves… For Hoover, the FBI’s (Totally fabricated) reputation was everything!

  13. Mikeyj

    Mikeyj said, almost 2 years ago

    @NightShade09

    You’re replying to NightShade09’s comment:

    Thanks for the info, Mikeyj!
    When I was small, my grandfather would tell me about his childhood in Halifax; I guess that explains a homing instinct I have to go north.
    ^
    ^
    Most of the Momiji were on the West coast, but, I suppose there were likely a few on the East coast; the Momiji were kept mainly in detention camps inland, mostly in Northern Ontario (as were the actual POWs from the German army)

  14. Kantuck Nadie Nata-Akon

    Kantuck Nadie Nata-Akon said, almost 2 years ago

    Although I have the deepest respect and admiration for President Roosevelt. I will say that this is one of America’s worse acts ever. Even in the light of history it was still something that shouldn’t have even been /suggested/, much less carried out. You have my deepest regrets and sympathies, Mr. Takei for having to endure that. It is only equaled to the Indian Removal Act of 1830. Thank you however for sharing your experiences. My age? I’m 45, but also a minority in which we share.

    - Kan

  15. Firewater

    Firewater said, almost 2 years ago

    I just got caught up on the Staton and Curtis era of Dick Tracy, and I am glad I did. Mike lives just down the road from me here in central Arkansas, which I discovered while voting at the Conway Library last November. I’m looking forward to more strips.

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