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Biographic

By Steve McGarry
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Jun 1, 2014
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Biographic
Steve McGarry

Crosby, Stills & Nash

"Mr. Tambourine Man" and "Turn! Turn! Turn!"  gave The Byrds chart-topping success in the mid-1960s but the band was plagued by internal conflicts.  After David Crosby was sacked in 1967, he began collaborating with Stephen Stills. 

When Stephen's band, Buffalo Springfield, disintegrated in 1968, he and Crosby began working together in earnest.  They recruited Graham Nash from U.K. popsters The Hollies, and the lineup of one of rock's first supergroups was complete.

The trio's 1969 debut album, "Crosby, Stills & Nash," was a hit, after which Neil Young, who had played with Stills in Buffalo Springfield, was brought in as a full partner to augment the live sound.

The group's second concert performance was at the legendary Woodstock Festival in 1969.  The following year, the eagerly awaited "De Ja Vu" album soared to the top of the charts.

Ego clashes and bickering brought a plethora of splinter projects, each member issuing successful solo albums.  Crosby and Nash teamed up as a duo, as did Stills and Young.  The quartet sporadically reunited, but by the end of the '70s, the original trio was back in the harness without Young.  However, Crosby's wild lifestyle was taking a heavy toll, culminating in a jail sentence and health problems that would eventually necessitate a liver transplant.  

Crosby, Stills & Nash was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1997.  All three men have also been inducted for their work with their original groups - Young has also been inducted twice (for his solo work and as a member of Buffalo Springfield), the trio have continued to pursue solo projects, but frequently convene to perform and record - occasionally in tandem with Young - and will tour the U.S. again this summer.
Jun 15, 2014
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