Advertisement

248 of 545 Comics Updated Today

Advertisement

Build Your Own Funny Pages.

Go Premium

Today's Trending

Over the Hedge

Sep 24, 2017

Monty

Sep 24, 2017

Arlo and Janis

Sep 24, 2017
Advertisement

Doonesbury

Sep 24, 2017

Top 5


GoComics All-Stars

Updated Today
11,794 Subscribers

WuMo celebrates life's absurdity, holding up a fun-house mirror to our modern world and everyone who lives in it. Populated by crazy beavers, disgruntled office workers, feuding couples, gangster rappers and pool-playing unicorns, WuMo has grown from an underground sensation to an instant classic.

WuMo

Wulff & Morgenthaler

Updated Today
1,547 Subscribers

Here are the dreams of all children—worlds of fantasy, humor, terror, and grand adventure. Little Nemo in Slumberland was the greatest comic strip of its day, perhaps the greatest of all time, acclaimed the world over for it’s artistic majesty, unbounded imagination, and ground-breaking techniques that helped define a new art form. Sunday Press presents Winsor McCay’s masterpiece in all its glory, on the web for the first time ever, in sequence, starting with the very first page. Over 100 years later, these Sunday comic strips, which influenced generations of artists, are as fresh and glorious as ever! A BRIEF HISTORY Zenas Winsor McCay was born sometime between 1867 and 1870, most likely in Canada, though his earliest years are not well documented. He quickly gained fame, as his natural talent as an artist and draftsman saw him rise quickly from dime museum sign painter, to prolific newspaper artist and cartoonist, to pioneer animator, even a vaudeville quick-draw entertainer. He started his serious illustration work Cincinnati, where he created his first Sunday feature, Tales of the Jungle Imps (1903), while also drawing illustrations for the original Life magazine. He moved on to the New York Herald where he created a number of small cartoon features, and then Little Sammy Sneeze, Dream of the Rarebit Fiend, and his masterpiece, Little Nemo in Slumberland. Little Nemo drew character inspiration from McCay’s son Robert, architecture and design from the 1893 World’s Columbia Exposition in Chicago, and fantastical features from those found at the Coney Island Amusement park near his home in Brooklyn. But the brilliance of it all came from McCay himself, with his unsurpassed draftsmanship and boundless imagination that created a new language of comics, even anticipating aspects of modern cinema decades before appearing on the screen. There were three incarnations of Little Nemo, first at the Herald from 1905 to 1911, then at Hearst’s American from 1911 to 1914, and once again at the Herald from 1924 to 1927. Winsor McCay died in 1934, ending his career drawing marvelously detailed editorial cartoons. Looking at the images presented in this online feature, it is no surprise that he once stated, “I have never been so happy as when I was drawing Little Nemo in Slumberland.”

Little Nemo

Winsor McCay

Updated Today
94,424 Subscribers

From the pub to the bedroom, Andy’s misadventures paint an indelible portrait of an extremely British battle of the sexes. Join Andy and Flo as they bicker their way through life.

Andy Capp

Reg Smythe


Trending in Political

Doonesbury

Sep 24, 2017

Signe Wilkinson

Sep 24, 2017

Steve Breen

Sep 24, 2017
Advertisement

Robert Ariail

Sep 24, 2017

NEW On GoComics


GC Blog

Punctuation Comics
Laugh TracksSeptember 24, 2017

10 Punctuation Day Comics???!!!

By The GoComics Team
Iguana Day Quincy Foxtrot
Laugh TracksSeptember 09, 2017

11 Comics Celebrating Iguana Awareness Day With Quincy From 'FoxTrot'

By The GoComics Team
Advertisement

Comic Collections


Genres


Treat Yo' Self

Help feed a cartoonist for less than $2/month. Plus, no ads!
Get Premium Now!