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Amanda the Great is a comic about its author, Amanda, and her long-suffering fiancé (and eventually, husband) Dan.

Amanda the Great

Amanda El-Dweek

1,472 Subscribers

Here are the dreams of all children—worlds of fantasy, humor, terror, and grand adventure. Little Nemo in Slumberland was the greatest comic strip of its day, perhaps the greatest of all time, acclaimed the world over for it’s artistic majesty, unbounded imagination, and ground-breaking techniques that helped define a new art form. Sunday Press presents Winsor McCay’s masterpiece in all its glory, on the web for the first time ever, in sequence, starting with the very first page. Over 100 years later, these Sunday comic strips, which influenced generations of artists, are as fresh and glorious as ever! A BRIEF HISTORY Zenas Winsor McCay was born sometime between 1867 and 1870, most likely in Canada, though his earliest years are not well documented. He quickly gained fame, as his natural talent as an artist and draftsman saw him rise quickly from dime museum sign painter, to prolific newspaper artist and cartoonist, to pioneer animator, even a vaudeville quick-draw entertainer. He started his serious illustration work Cincinnati, where he created his first Sunday feature, Tales of the Jungle Imps (1903), while also drawing illustrations for the original Life magazine. He moved on to the New York Herald where he created a number of small cartoon features, and then Little Sammy Sneeze, Dream of the Rarebit Fiend, and his masterpiece, Little Nemo in Slumberland. Little Nemo drew character inspiration from McCay’s son Robert, architecture and design from the 1893 World’s Columbia Exposition in Chicago, and fantastical features from those found at the Coney Island Amusement park near his home in Brooklyn. But the brilliance of it all came from McCay himself, with his unsurpassed draftsmanship and boundless imagination that created a new language of comics, even anticipating aspects of modern cinema decades before appearing on the screen. There were three incarnations of Little Nemo, first at the Herald from 1905 to 1911, then at Hearst’s American from 1911 to 1914, and once again at the Herald from 1924 to 1927. Winsor McCay died in 1934, ending his career drawing marvelously detailed editorial cartoons. Looking at the images presented in this online feature, it is no surprise that he once stated, “I have never been so happy as when I was drawing Little Nemo in Slumberland.”

Little Nemo

Winsor McCay

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Please Keep Warm is essentially the television show Friends but with references to The Cure. Covering exciting subjects like not having an idea for a novel, showing a child how to play Doom II, and not knowing what day of the week Silicon Valley comes on.

Please Keep Warm

Mike Sweater

258 Subscribers

Click here to read the latest The Upside Down World of Gustave Verbeek.

The Upside Down World of Gustave Verbeek

Gustave Verbeek

302 Subscribers

Click here to read the latest Dumbwich Castle.

Dumbwich Castle

Lord Birthday


Trending in Political
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From his studio in southeastern New England, Brian McFadden skewers the news and pop culture every week with his irreverent cartoons.

Brian McFadden

3,414 Subscribers

Darrin Bell challenges social, political and cultural assumptions. His award-winning work navigates issues such as civil rights, pop culture, family, science fiction, scriptural wisdom and nihilist philosophy while often casting subjects in roles that are traditionally denied them. According to Darrin, "I cast against type to tell dynamic stories, of people who're bold enough and secure enough to challenge preconceptions. I depict that as the true legacy of America, in everything from its explorers, to its democratic-republican form of government, to its civil rights struggle, to its injection of mankind into space, to its musical innovations. There’s nothing more fundamentally all-American than a square peg that insists on filling a round hole." Darrin also creates the comic strips Candorville and Rudy Park.

Darrin Bell

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Rebecca Hendin's illustrations take a look at current events with a combination of existential anxiety and sheer amazement at the inexplicable beauty of existence, with a cherry of deadpan jibe on top. Her viewpoint reflects her transatlantic residence between the UK and the United States, giving her a unique perspective on situations on all sides of the seas. Blog | Website

Rebecca Hendin

Updated Today
2,636 Subscribers

Phil Hands is the editorial cartoonist for the Wisconsin State Journal, in Madison, Wis. He draws cartoons on a wide range of topics from state politics to international affairs. A passionate political moderate, Phil creates thoughtful editorial cartoons that attack the partisan hacks and hypocrites on both sides of the aisle. Phil has won a number of state awards for editorial cartooning and was the 2012 recipient of the Society of Professional Journalists Sigma Delta Chi award for editorial cartooning for circulation under 100,000.

Phil Hands

4,725 Subscribers

He's always right.

Mike Lester

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