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Click here to read the latest In Security.

In Security

Bea R.

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Here are the dreams of all children—worlds of fantasy, humor, terror, and grand adventure. Little Nemo in Slumberland was the greatest comic strip of its day, perhaps the greatest of all time, acclaimed the world over for it’s artistic majesty, unbounded imagination, and ground-breaking techniques that helped define a new art form. Sunday Press presents Winsor McCay’s masterpiece in all its glory, on the web for the first time ever, in sequence, starting with the very first page. Over 100 years later, these Sunday comic strips, which influenced generations of artists, are as fresh and glorious as ever! A BRIEF HISTORY Zenas Winsor McCay was born sometime between 1867 and 1870, most likely in Canada, though his earliest years are not well documented. He quickly gained fame, as his natural talent as an artist and draftsman saw him rise quickly from dime museum sign painter, to prolific newspaper artist and cartoonist, to pioneer animator, even a vaudeville quick-draw entertainer. He started his serious illustration work Cincinnati, where he created his first Sunday feature, Tales of the Jungle Imps (1903), while also drawing illustrations for the original Life magazine. He moved on to the New York Herald where he created a number of small cartoon features, and then Little Sammy Sneeze, Dream of the Rarebit Fiend, and his masterpiece, Little Nemo in Slumberland. Little Nemo drew character inspiration from McCay’s son Robert, architecture and design from the 1893 World’s Columbia Exposition in Chicago, and fantastical features from those found at the Coney Island Amusement park near his home in Brooklyn. But the brilliance of it all came from McCay himself, with his unsurpassed draftsmanship and boundless imagination that created a new language of comics, even anticipating aspects of modern cinema decades before appearing on the screen. There were three incarnations of Little Nemo, first at the Herald from 1905 to 1911, then at Hearst’s American from 1911 to 1914, and once again at the Herald from 1924 to 1927. Winsor McCay died in 1934, ending his career drawing marvelously detailed editorial cartoons. Looking at the images presented in this online feature, it is no surprise that he once stated, “I have never been so happy as when I was drawing Little Nemo in Slumberland.”

Little Nemo

Winsor McCay

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Please Keep Warm is essentially the television show Friends but with references to The Cure. Covering exciting subjects like not having an idea for a novel, showing a child how to play Doom II, and not knowing what day of the week Silicon Valley comes on.

Please Keep Warm

Mike Sweater

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Click here to read the latest The Upside Down World of Gustave Verbeek.

The Upside Down World of Gustave Verbeek

Gustave Verbeek

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The story of two adorable housecats and the dark gods they worship. Pippi and Fargo live in Los Angeles. And in space. And beyond the terrors of the mind. Well, okay. They're just a couple of regular house cats. But they can dream, you know.

@Tavicat

Rikki Simons and Tavisha Wolfgarth-Simons


Trending in Political
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From his studio in southeastern New England, Brian McFadden skewers the news and pop culture every week with his irreverent cartoons.

Brian McFadden

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Phil Hands is the editorial cartoonist for the Wisconsin State Journal, in Madison, Wis. He draws cartoons on a wide range of topics from state politics to international affairs. A passionate political moderate, Phil creates thoughtful editorial cartoons that attack the partisan hacks and hypocrites on both sides of the aisle. Phil has won a number of state awards for editorial cartooning and was the 2012 recipient of the Society of Professional Journalists Sigma Delta Chi award for editorial cartooning for circulation under 100,000.

Phil Hands

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Rebecca Hendin's illustrations take a look at current events with a combination of existential anxiety and sheer amazement at the inexplicable beauty of existence, with a cherry of deadpan jibe on top. Her viewpoint reflects her transatlantic residence between the UK and the United States, giving her a unique perspective on situations on all sides of the seas. Blog | Website

Rebecca Hendin

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“Garfield gives ‘That Monkey Tune’ two paws up!” – Garfield Creator, Jim Davis Meet Elliot: a fun-sized cute monkey who loves TV, pizza, TV, cookies, TV and did we mention TV? While his brainy friend Beagly loves books, books and more books. The only thing these two furry friends have in common is their hopeless, dateless and clueless human owner, Umo. With this bumbling trio of cuteness, braininess, and stupidity, hilarity is sure to ensue, and will leave you wanting to check back daily so you don’t miss a beat of their monkey tune! Visit thatmonkeytune.com

That Monkey Tune

Michael A. Kandalaft

4,729 Subscribers

He's always right.

Mike Lester

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