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Stone Soup Classics by Jan Eliot for July 27, 2019

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    ChristineFoxdale  almost 2 years ago

    Well, they darn well SHOULD have.

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    Night-Gaunt49  almost 2 years ago

    So math class has no connexion to reality?

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    Stevefk  almost 2 years ago

    You can always count on your fingers, and your toes too if the sale is large enough.

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    alicejo  almost 2 years ago

    I’ve had some cashiers panic when the power went off the end of scanning. Couldn’t make change in their heads, had to get a calculator , then one had to get manager because she couldn’t count the change. What do they teach in school? I learned to count backwards the change first then the dollars .

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    loridobson Premium Member almost 2 years ago

    I love messing with them, when you give them the pennies or other coins above the whole amount so they can return a larger simpler denomination. You can watch their faces freeze, like a computer crash.

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    Khatkhattu Premium Member almost 2 years ago

    It is so much fun to give people an odd amount so you can get a bill back instead of a fistful of coins.

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    HappyDog Premium Member almost 2 years ago

    I hate loose change. The very few times I use cash, I always put any coins I get back in the tip jar.

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    Diat60  almost 2 years ago

    We used to run a small shop selling, among other things, candy. Kids, and I mean high school kids, used to watch in amazement as we mentally added up their totals rather than inputting each item on the cash register. When we explained the “trick” (adding or subtracting to the nearest zero) they’d be amazed. No mental arithmetic taught in schools.

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    serenasakitty  almost 2 years ago

    With modern cash tills all money, including what is given out as change, has to go through the system so it has to be registered.

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    kab2rb  almost 2 years ago

    Son who works grocery store, either outside on shopping carts, or cash register, the register lets worker know on change. I had to help brother-in-law/sister at their vendor booth, so precaution, I make side notes for large bills what customer might pay to come up with correct change, I just glance at, saved time.

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    MissScarlet Premium Member almost 2 years ago

    Wasn’t taught in school 50 years ago. I learned when I worked at a taco stand.

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    gammaguy  almost 2 years ago

    “But they didn’t teach us this in math class.”

    They taught me to count, add, and subtract beginning in the first grade, and that those concepts (they didn’t call them that; that was a later generation’s “new math”) applied to all things which could be counted… cookies, sheets of paper, classmates, and yes… money.

    For me, math has never been something separate from everyday reality… nor everyday reality separate from math.

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    1MadHat Premium Member almost 2 years ago

    I always thought it was normal, as I was a kid in the early 50s, but my mom taught me to count, count money, and how to count change… Before I finished kindergarten. And most of the other kids could, too.

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    Sneaker  almost 2 years ago

    Every chance I get I complain about the just slapping your change in you hand without counting it back to you ,and a lot,of younger ones don’t even say thank you. #$&*$##!

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    Night-Gaunt49  almost 2 years ago

    Most do not like change, most adapt. If we did not we would die out.

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    mandy052878  almost 2 years ago

    I didn’t learn how to count back change until I was almost 30. Most retail jobs I had up until that point we entered the amount and the register told us the change. But I always told the customer how much change they were getting back.

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    mafastore  almost 2 years ago

    My mom, who has a masters in library science and another in taxation plus a bachelor’s degree in accounting, decided to take a “housewives going back to work” class offered locally, free of charge (although she did check first that no one who needed the class would not be able to take it if she did). She became friendly with the young woman who sat beside her. The young woman was always upset when arithmetic (not even math, arithmetic) was involved as she had trouble with same. My mom asked what job the woman currently had as part of general conversation. She said that she was a store cashier. Mom was confused – “Don’t you need to arithmetic at work?” “No, the register tells us what change to give.”

    We go daily to a local Wendys for lunch (and also for Saturday night dinner). Our lunch is the same every day. Until a recent raise in price, the lunch cost $3.23 – a junior burger plain, two regular junior burgers, two senior sodas (free) – sometimes keychain frosties (pay $2 and get same all year for no extra cost). Husband would have exact change as the employees would have trouble making change. For some reason no matter what amount was handed to them everyone of them would enter the amount of the sale as the amount tendered and then had to try to calculate the change. I did not believe him until he was unwell for a couple of months and I had to go up and get the lunch

    One of the problems today is that people are not taught to pay for things with cash. Now, understand I am not against credit cards and we put almost everything we buy on same if for no reason than the % back helps pays the bills. But when my niece was young, my sister would hand her the money sometimes to pay for the purchase. She saw that she had less money after the payment was made. With someone who is never taught this – at this basic a level they never really understand the value of money and or the arithmetic involved with it.

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    mafastore  almost 2 years ago

    @Hemphogg – I disagree also. We put everything we can on our credit cards. We have also paid, with one exception, all of credit cards in full monthly – for the 40+ years we have had same. (The one exception was half paid one month and the full balance the next as it was the same cost as taking out money out of savings the month before when husband’s sick pay out for the year was delayed a month). It cost us nothing. We get money, albeit a tiny amount in proportion, back on our credit cards – bought a fridge last month for $700 and got back 5% – not much – $35 – but that means that the fridge cost that much less.

    If the cash is in our wallets it can be lost or stolen. The credit card can be canceled with no monetary loss if it is stolen and replaced. We have a checking account which costs us nothing for having it, checks clearing through or to obtain blank checks and pays us a "whopping 1% interest on the money in the account – which I transfer in weekly based on the checks that I will write in the coming week.

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