Missing large

Joy Sabl Premium

Comics I Follow

M2Bulls

M2Bulls

By Marty Two Bulls Sr.
Liz Climo Cartoons

Liz Climo Cartoons

By Liz Climo
Clay Bennett

Clay Bennett

Yes, I'm Hot in This

Yes, I'm Hot in This

By Huda Fahmy
ViewsAsia

ViewsAsia

By CartoonArts International
ViewsEurope

ViewsEurope

By CartoonArts International
Crabgrass

Crabgrass

By Tauhid Bondia
Swan Eaters

Swan Eaters

By Georgia Dunn
Monty

Monty

By Jim Meddick
Life on Earth

Life on Earth

By Ham
Mo

Mo

By Ann Telnaes
Lalo Alcaraz

Lalo Alcaraz

AJ and Magnus

AJ and Magnus

By Bryan and Simon Steel
Tough Town

Tough Town

By Bob Shannon
Rabbits Against Magic

Rabbits Against Magic

By Jonathan Lemon
Lukey McGarry’s TLDR

Lukey McGarry’s TLDR

By Luke McGarry
Amanda the Great

Amanda the Great

By Amanda El-Dweek
Spirit of the Staircase

Spirit of the Staircase

By Matthew Foltz-Gray
@Tavicat

@Tavicat

By Rikki Simons and Tavisha Wolfgarth-Simons
Sketchshark Comics

Sketchshark Comics

By Megan Dong
9 Chickweed Lane

9 Chickweed Lane

By Brooke McEldowney
Candorville

Candorville

By Darrin Bell
Frazz

Frazz

By Jef Mallett
Get Fuzzy

Get Fuzzy

By Darby Conley
Scary Gary

Scary Gary

By Mark Buford
Pearls Before Swine

Pearls Before Swine

By Stephan Pastis
Barney & Clyde

Barney & Clyde

By Gene Weingarten, Dan Weingarten & David Clark
(th)ink

(th)ink

By Keith Knight
Doonesbury

Doonesbury

By Garry Trudeau
The Fusco Brothers

The Fusco Brothers

By J.C. Duffy
Basic Instructions

Basic Instructions

By Scott Meyer
Buni

Buni

By Ryan Pagelow
Jeff Danziger

Jeff Danziger

Matt Davies

Matt Davies

Break of Day

Break of Day

By Nate Fakes
Family Tree

Family Tree

By Signe Wilkinson
Daddy's Home

Daddy's Home

By Tony Rubino and Gary Markstein
Signe Wilkinson

Signe Wilkinson

Phoebe and Her Unicorn

Phoebe and Her Unicorn

By Dana Simpson
Ollie and Quentin

Ollie and Quentin

By Piers Baker
Berger & Wyse

Berger & Wyse

By Pascal Wyse and Joe Berger
Tom the Dancing Bug

Tom the Dancing Bug

By Ruben Bolling
Ozy and Millie

Ozy and Millie

By Dana Simpson
The Argyle Sweater

The Argyle Sweater

By Scott Hilburn
La Cucaracha

La Cucaracha

By Lalo Alcaraz
Origins of the Sunday Comics

Origins of the Sunday Comics

By Peter Maresca
The K Chronicles

The K Chronicles

By Keith Knight
Poorly Drawn Lines

Poorly Drawn Lines

By Reza Farazmand
WuMo

WuMo

By Wulff & Morgenthaler
The Knight Life

The Knight Life

By Keith Knight
Dinosaur Comics

Dinosaur Comics

By Ryan North
Savage Chickens

Savage Chickens

By Doug Savage
Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal

By Zach Weinersmith
Cul de Sac

Cul de Sac

By Richard Thompson
Speed Bump

Speed Bump

By Dave Coverly
Invisible Bread

Invisible Bread

By Justin Boyd
Sarah's Scribbles

Sarah's Scribbles

By Sarah Andersen
Stone Soup

Stone Soup

By Jan Eliot
Bloom County 2019

Bloom County 2019

By Berkeley Breathed
Scenes from a Multiverse

Scenes from a Multiverse

By Jon Rosenberg
Bad Reporter

Bad Reporter

By Don Asmussen
Luann

Luann

By Greg Evans
Non Sequitur

Non Sequitur

By Wiley Miller
Rob Rogers

Rob Rogers

Rudy Park

Rudy Park

By Darrin Bell and Theron Heir
Baldo

Baldo

By Hector D. Cantú and Carlos Castellanos
Overboard

Overboard

By Chip Dunham
The Boondocks

The Boondocks

By Aaron McGruder
Little Nemo

Little Nemo

By Winsor McCay
Thatababy

Thatababy

By Paul Trap
Lay Lines

Lay Lines

By Carol Lay
Breaking Cat News

Breaking Cat News

By Georgia Dunn
Four Eyes

Four Eyes

By Gemma Correll
Sticky Comics

Sticky Comics

By Christiann MacAuley
Sketchshark Comics

Sketchshark Comics

By Megan Dong
Spirit of the Staircase

Spirit of the Staircase

By Matthew Foltz-Gray
Mom's Cancer

Mom's Cancer

By Brian Fies
Green Humour

Green Humour

By Rohan Chakravarty
Edge City

Edge City

By Terry and Patty LaBan

Recent Comments

  1. 3 months ago on Frazz

    100 years of Solitude? Blindness (Saramago)?

  2. 3 months ago on Origins of the Sunday Comics

    Historical note on Santos Dumont (here, “santos doomong”): as well as his balloon exploits, this Brazilian inventor was also, according to some, the true inventor and flyer of the first / first real / first practical airplane.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alberto_Santos-Dumont

  3. 4 months ago on Lalo Alcaraz

    This can’t be as topical as it looks, given deadlines, right?

    Possible “awakening” effects—I’m not holding my breath.

    A bad round with Covid only very modestly opened Boris Johnson’s eyes. Trump’s cut from a double layer of the same reality-shedding cloth.

  4. 4 months ago on Green Humour

    The cell phone bit is urban legend, with a (weak) basis in one study showing (at a level of significance that’s not wildly convincing, given the existence of “publication bias,” the problem caused by positive unexpected results being considered far more publishable than failure to see an effect) that birds nesting on actual cell phone towers have somewhat smaller and fewer young. There’s also study showing robins lose their ability to orient in the presence of fields between 2 kilohertz and 5 megahertz; but that’s AM radio range (or some sorts of physics equipment), not cell phone signal range.

    See (cached version for text only / full access): http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:8opzJo7qcC0J:https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/phenomena/2014/05/07/electromagnetic-noise-disrupts-bird-compass/&hl=en&gl=us&strip=1&vwsrc=0

    Man-Made Electromagnetic Noise Disrupts a Bird’s Compass, national geographic

    for fuller description of the electromagnetic issue, which also contains a link to debunking of other anecdotal sources by controlled experiments.

  5. 4 months ago on Signe Wilkinson

    A lot of money is going into what in most years would have been considered entirely spurious challenges and appeals of rulings on those challenges and appeals of appeals of rulings, as far as which candidates (often, independent or third party candidates) have qualified to get on the ballot. If any decision is delayed, any ballot including that race can’t be printed and mailed. Or if they’re printed and mailed on the basis of a judgement that’s then overturned, they have to be re-called, and people have to re-vote.

    In fact, due to the calendar for challenges and counter-challenges, some regions don’t ever expect to have ballots printed, sorted, bundled and ready for mailing until ~two weeks before the election. (These are the normally invisible parts of the process, but if you google your county and state, and “election calendar” and “challenge,” you will see some of the workings. Though those deadlines refer to the first filing for the challenge.)

    In addition, some states, by law, have to take absentee and mail voting requests until as little as a week before the election; primarily in areas where the USPS used to guarantee same-day delivery within the county. (I lived in one such region; they are real.) When that guarantee disappeared a few years ago, post office hours were cut, and the number of pickups from mailboxes even at the post office was reduced, mail-voting problems ticked up a notch. People would miss the unexpectedly early last pickup on Friday, there was no pickup saturday, and the pickup on monday didn’t get the mail to the election office on Tuesday.

    In those areas, USPS now will not guarantee even two-day turnaround. Add two days to the schedule, and the timeline becomes untenable. A ballot mailed to the voter on the Tuesday prior to election day will not be in the voters hands and returned in time to count.

  6. 4 months ago on Monty

    Rather the opposite. Having been there myself, here’s how it worked.

    Rationale: “Having a community” consistently (and understandably) rates highly for people making college decisions. If you happen to be white, and would not have considered going to a historically black college that’s still more than 98% african american, with no white faculty, you presumably understand the feeling; but for native americans applying to top private schools, the numbers never even get that high. “Stanford has the highest share of students identifying as American Indian or Alaska Native in its American undergraduate population, at 0.9%.”

    Process: After hiring (for faculty), and after admission (for students) Harvard went out of its way to encourage both faculty and students to claim whatever partial heritage they might have, as a way to encourage more minorities to apply. They don’t get federal money for it. There’s no scholarship or preferment or even a free donut for the people involved. Just the knowledge that someone brilliant from an under-represented community might be moved to consider Harvard, even if it’s far away, not culturally familiar, etc.

    Result: underwhelming. Harvard wasn’t (and isn’t) alone in assuming that “having community” and “having people here who identify in some way with your culture, and want you to be comfortable and successful here” are fungible. They’re not, of course. Dartmouth is an exception, with numbers in the 4% range; and it was originally founded as a college for the education of Native Americans (education, indoctrination…discuss…) yet only graduated 19 native americans in its first 200 years.

  7. 4 months ago on ViewsEurope

    per Reuters, camp residents are quoted as saying it was right-wing townpeople, who took the opportunity to do it during the asylum seekr protests; the townpeople are quoted as saying that it was burnt by the asylum seekers themselves (with all their few worldly goods inside?) and that if it is built again, “those people will burn it again, 100% certain.”

  8. 4 months ago on Rudy Park

    “unfortunate p%n!s”

  9. 5 months ago on Origins of the Sunday Comics

    Here’s a find: a fictionalized re-enactment filmed by Thomas Edison (!) of Colonel Funston swimming the Bagbag (sometimes, Baglag) river, Bulacan, Philippines (referenced in panel 7).

    https://www.loc.gov/item/99407593/

    Funston (as Brigadier General) was also involved in covering up US atrocities (the shooting of unarmed prisoners) at the battle of Caloocan (panel 8).

  10. 5 months ago on Rudy Park

    Roofies? This better end up substantive. If it’s an easy joke, it’s horribly un-funny.