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Vision impaired

Comics I Follow

Pluggers

Pluggers

By Rick McKee
Nancy

Nancy

By Olivia Jaimes
Andy Capp

Andy Capp

By Reg Smythe
Shoe

Shoe

By Gary Brookins and Susie MacNelly
Back to B.C.

Back to B.C.

By Johnny Hart
Nancy Classics

Nancy Classics

By Ernie Bushmiller
Mutt & Jeff

Mutt & Jeff

By Bud Fisher
Gasoline Alley

Gasoline Alley

By Jim Scancarelli
Alley Oop

Alley Oop

By Jonathan Lemon and Joey Alison Sayers
Wizard of Id

Wizard of Id

By Parker and Hart
B.C.

B.C.

By Mastroianni and Hart
Bound and Gagged

Bound and Gagged

By Dana Summers
Frank and Ernest

Frank and Ernest

By Thaves
Rose is Rose

Rose is Rose

By Don Wimmer and Pat Brady
For Better or For Worse

For Better or For Worse

By Lynn Johnston
Pickles

Pickles

By Brian Crane
One Big Happy

One Big Happy

By Rick Detorie
Arlo and Janis

Arlo and Janis

By Jimmy Johnson
Betty

Betty

By Gary Delainey and Gerry Rasmussen
Peanuts

Peanuts

By Charles Schulz
Luann

Luann

By Greg Evans
Luann Againn

Luann Againn

By Greg Evans
Zack Hill

Zack Hill

By John Deering and John Newcombe
Red and Rover

Red and Rover

By Brian Basset
On A Claire Day

On A Claire Day

By Carla Ventresca and Henry Beckett
The Dinette Set

The Dinette Set

By Julie Larson
Daddy's Home

Daddy's Home

By Tony Rubino and Gary Markstein
Momma

Momma

By Mell Lazarus
Cathy Classics

Cathy Classics

By Cathy Guisewite
Adam@Home

Adam@Home

By Rob Harrell
Herb and Jamaal

Herb and Jamaal

By Stephen Bentley
Flo and Friends

Flo and Friends

By Jenny Campbell
The Born Loser

The Born Loser

By Art and Chip Sansom
The Other Coast

The Other Coast

By Adrian Raeside
Heathcliff

Heathcliff

By George Gately
Fred Basset

Fred Basset

By Alex Graham
Overboard

Overboard

By Chip Dunham
Marmaduke

Marmaduke

By Brad Anderson
Garfield

Garfield

By Jim Davis
For Heaven's Sake

For Heaven's Sake

By Mike Morgan
Thin Lines

Thin Lines

By Randy Glasbergen
Drabble

Drabble

By Kevin Fagan
Herman

Herman

By Jim Unger
Prickly City

Prickly City

By Scott Stantis
Broom Hilda

Broom Hilda

By Russell Myers
Working It Out

Working It Out

By Charlos Gary
9 to 5

9 to 5

By Harley Schwadron
Bottomliners

Bottomliners

By Eric and Bill Teitelbaum
Loose Parts

Loose Parts

By Dave Blazek
Brevity

Brevity

By Dan Thompson
F Minus

F Minus

By Tony Carrillo
Close to Home

Close to Home

By John McPherson
Chuckle Bros

Chuckle Bros

By Brian and Ron Boychuk
Cornered

Cornered

By Mike Baldwin
Free Range

Free Range

By Bill Whitehead
The Flying McCoys

The Flying McCoys

By Glenn McCoy and Gary McCoy
Strange Brew

Strange Brew

By John Deering
Rubes

Rubes

By Leigh Rubin
Ballard Street

Ballard Street

By Jerry Van Amerongen
Speed Bump

Speed Bump

By Dave Coverly
The Argyle Sweater

The Argyle Sweater

By Scott Hilburn
Andy Capp

Andy Capp

By Reg Smythe
Pluggers

Pluggers

By Rick McKee
Mutt & Jeff

Mutt & Jeff

By Bud Fisher
Red and Rover

Red and Rover

By Brian Basset
Gasoline Alley

Gasoline Alley

By Jim Scancarelli
For Heaven's Sake

For Heaven's Sake

By Mike Morgan
One Big Happy

One Big Happy

By Rick Detorie

Recent Comments

  1. 3 months ago on Nancy

    Remember when Nancy meant you WOULD see Nancy – Nancy had friends – Nancy’s friends SMILED – and just enjoyed being average third-grade kids?

    FROM THE OLDEN DAYS WHEN NANCY ACTUALLY APPEARED IN THE NANCY STRIP, SHE HAD FRIENDS WHO SMILED, AND ALL THE KIDS ACTUALLY ENJOYED BEING AVERAGE THIRD-GRADE KIDS

    https://www.gocomics.com/nancy/1996/02/02

    XXXXXXXXXXXX

  2. 3 months ago on Nancy

    Still more Nancy Without Nancy – Ho Hum!

  3. 3 months ago on Nancy

    More Nancy Without Nancy – Ho Hum!

  4. 3 months ago on Nancy

    There is a cartoon strip called GARFIELD MINUS GARFIELD – they need to re-name this one – NANCY – WITHOUT NANCY.

  5. 4 months ago on One Big Happy

    ON September 11 this year, I went back to all of the strips which said “Never Forget” on September 11, 2002 – and it was disappointing to see how many of them made not a single reference to September 11 this year – it’s really sad. I was there, but I was pretty your, 75 years ago when World War II officially ended – but not a single strip made mention of that event. NEXT YEAR will be the 80th anniversary of Pearl Harbor – another time which everyone claimed they would never forget. Can’t help wondering if there will be any strips which remember then. Most of them forgot the 75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor – and that includes strips like Gasoline Alley – which was in publication in 1941. Saying stuff like “never forget” doesn’t mean much if the next thing you do is forget. The “greatest generation” is truly gone! Sad!

  6. 4 months ago on Nancy Classics

    I Started first grade in 1948 – which was the first year that kids from the country were bused in to town to attend a consolidated school. The year before, we would have attended a one-room school, with all 8 grades learning at the same time in the same room. When they began busing all kids in to one consolidated school. At that time, one teacher would have TWO classes in one room – First grade and second grade would have one teacher. If there were 15 to 20 kids in each class, one teacher would be teaching between 30 and 50 kids at one time. As previously observed – in those days – ALL kids were expected to teach all teachers with great respect. If you failed to do so, you would end up in the principal’s office. In the event that you had a telephone at home (we didn’t!) the principal would call your home and request to speak to your FATHER! Since most fathers were farmers, that would mean that your mother would have to find a way to travel out to the field, where he was working. By the time your father arrived at the school, he was going to be too perturbed to pay any attention to any claims you might make that you were innocent of all charges—No matter what the problem was, you knew going in that your folks were going to agree with the principal and your teacher about whatever punishment you deserved. It usually took only one experience like that to convince most kids that it simply would do NOT good to act up in class – so most kids were quick to mind the teacher, the bus driver, the principal and even the school janitor! There were 25 kids in our graduating high school class – so, back when we were all in first grade, the first grade teacher would have been teaching 50 kids in first and second grade. Also, of course, in those days, the teacher WAS allowed to counsel you on the seat of your pants with her ruler – and many did just that!

  7. 5 months ago on Gasoline Alley

    I MISS Walt remembering things like the 75th Anniversary of the end of World War II!

  8. 5 months ago on On A Claire Day

    What happened to the trip to Paris? This goes all the way back to when she first began working at the library!

  9. 5 months ago on Mutt & Jeff

    LOVE the pot-bellied stove – but how “uptown” can you get – they’re all so rich, they’re using COAL in that stove. We used dry cow pies – went out every morning with gunny sacks and brought home the dry cow pies! Only many years later did we learn it was better for us to use the cow pies – the cow pies had fewer carcinogens than wood or coal!

  10. 6 months ago on Nancy Classics

    Try this again – Actually, For a long time, Thanksgiving was on the LAST Thursday in November. But, during the Depression, there were SOME Novembers which had FIVE Thursdays – so FDR changed Thanksgiving to the FOURTH Thursday in November – to make sure that shoppers would have an extra week for shopping – which merchants hoped would help to pull them out of their financial hole – which is how the Friday after Thanksgiving came to be known as Black Friday. Christmas, as it is celebrated in the U.S., is actually a shopping period. Many researchers believe that it is more likely that Jesus was born some time in September – among other reasons, because the shepherds were still grazing their sheep outside – and spending the night outside with the sheep. As a general rule, by December, it would be too cold – even in Israel – for shepherds to be sleeping outside while they watched their sheep. During the Depression, it was considered the patriotic thing to do to shop at Christmas. So, at least as early as 1939 – 1941 – Thanksgiving was the official ‘kick-off day" for Christmas shopping. But is was considered OK to tie Thanksgiving and Christmas together. Unfortunately, nowadays, stores begin promoting Christmas at Halloween! It isn’t unusual to see a witch with a caldron, pilgrims with turkeys, Santa and Christmas trees with lights all in the same space in some stores – Promoting Christmas shopping by the end of November is not so bad – Making the end of October through the first of January as one long shopping extravaganza is what makes people weary of Christmas long before it arrives.