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There once was a man named McCann, McCann was the name of that man. The man was McCann, And McCann was a man, But everyone knew him as Nancy.

Comics I Follow

Two Party Opera

Two Party Opera

By Brian Carroll
Francis

Francis

By Patrick J. Marrin
Back to B.C.

Back to B.C.

By Johnny Hart
Little Nemo

Little Nemo

By Winsor McCay
9 Chickweed Lane

9 Chickweed Lane

By Brooke McEldowney
Agnes

Agnes

By Tony Cochran
Stone Soup

Stone Soup

By Jan Eliot
Arlo and Janis

Arlo and Janis

By Jimmy Johnson
B.C.

B.C.

By Mastroianni and Hart
Bad Reporter

Bad Reporter

By Don Asmussen
Baldo

Baldo

By Hector D. Cantú and Carlos Castellanos
Barney & Clyde

Barney & Clyde

By Gene Weingarten, Dan Weingarten & David Clark
Betty

Betty

By Gary Delainey and Gerry Rasmussen
Big Nate

Big Nate

By Lincoln Peirce
Bloom County

Bloom County

By Berkeley Breathed
Bloom County 2019

Bloom County 2019

By Berkeley Breathed
Broom Hilda

Broom Hilda

By Russell Myers
Calvin and Hobbes

Calvin and Hobbes

By Bill Watterson
C'est la Vie

C'est la Vie

By Jennifer Babcock
Cornered

Cornered

By Mike Baldwin
La Cucaracha

La Cucaracha

By Lalo Alcaraz
Cul de Sac

Cul de Sac

By Richard Thompson
Dilbert Classics

Dilbert Classics

By Scott Adams
Dog Eat Doug

Dog Eat Doug

By Brian Anderson
Doonesbury

Doonesbury

By Garry Trudeau
The Doozies

The Doozies

By Tom Gammill
The Duplex

The Duplex

By Glenn McCoy and Gary McCoy
The Flying McCoys

The Flying McCoys

By Glenn McCoy and Gary McCoy
FoxTrot Classics

FoxTrot Classics

By Bill Amend
Frazz

Frazz

By Jef Mallett
Fred Basset

Fred Basset

By Alex Graham
Gaturro

Gaturro

By NIK
The Grizzwells

The Grizzwells

By Bill Schorr
Ink Pen

Ink Pen

By Phil Dunlap
JumpStart

JumpStart

By Robb Armstrong
Kliban

Kliban

By B. Kliban
Luann

Luann

By Greg Evans
Monty

Monty

By Jim Meddick
Nancy

Nancy

By Olivia Jaimes
Nick and Zuzu

Nick and Zuzu

By Nick Galifianakis
Non Sequitur

Non Sequitur

By Wiley Miller
Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

By T Lewis and Michael Fry
Overboard

Overboard

By Chip Dunham
Pearls Before Swine

Pearls Before Swine

By Stephan Pastis
Peanuts Begins

Peanuts Begins

By Charles Schulz
Peanuts

Peanuts

By Charles Schulz
Pooch Cafe

Pooch Cafe

By Paul Gilligan
Prickly City

Prickly City

By Scott Stantis
Randolph Itch, 2 a.m.

Randolph Itch, 2 a.m.

By Tom Toles
Real Life Adventures

Real Life Adventures

By Gary Wise and Lance Aldrich
Richard's Poor Almanac

Richard's Poor Almanac

By Richard Thompson
Rose is Rose

Rose is Rose

By Don Wimmer and Pat Brady
Tank McNamara

Tank McNamara

By Bill Hinds
That is Priceless

That is Priceless

By Steve Melcher
Tiny Sepuku

Tiny Sepuku

By Ken Cursoe
Tom the Dancing Bug

Tom the Dancing Bug

By Ruben Bolling
Super-Fun-Pak Comix

Super-Fun-Pak Comix

By Ruben Bolling
Wizard of Id

Wizard of Id

By Parker and Hart
Ziggy

Ziggy

By Tom Wilson & Tom II
The Fusco Brothers

The Fusco Brothers

By J.C. Duffy
The Knight Life

The Knight Life

By Keith Knight
Candorville

Candorville

By Darrin Bell
FoxTrot

FoxTrot

By Bill Amend
Get Fuzzy

Get Fuzzy

By Darby Conley
Lio

Lio

By Mark Tatulli
Lalo Alcaraz

Lalo Alcaraz

Nick Anderson

Nick Anderson

Robert Ariail

Robert Ariail

Clay Bennett

Clay Bennett

Lisa Benson

Lisa Benson

Steve Benson

Steve Benson

Chip Bok

Chip Bok

Matt Bors

Matt Bors

Steve Breen

Steve Breen

Chris Britt

Chris Britt

Tim Campbell

Tim Campbell

Stuart Carlson

Stuart Carlson

Jeff Danziger

Jeff Danziger

Matt Davies

Matt Davies

John Deering

John Deering

Al Goodwyn Editorial Cartoons

Al Goodwyn Editorial Cartoons

By Al Goodwyn
Bob Gorrell

Bob Gorrell

Walt Handelsman

Walt Handelsman

Phil Hands

Phil Hands

Joe Heller

Joe Heller

Clay Jones

Clay Jones

Kevin Kallaugher

Kevin Kallaugher

By KAL
Steve Kelley

Steve Kelley

Kevin Necessary Editorial Cartoons

Kevin Necessary Editorial Cartoons

By Kevin Necessary
Mike Lester

Mike Lester

Mike Luckovich

Mike Luckovich

Gary Markstein

Gary Markstein

M2Bulls

M2Bulls

By Marty Two Bulls Sr.
Brian McFadden

Brian McFadden

Jack Ohman

Jack Ohman

Henry Payne

Henry Payne

Ted Rall

Ted Rall

Michael Ramirez

Michael Ramirez

Rob Rogers

Rob Rogers

Drew Sheneman

Drew Sheneman

Jen Sorensen

Jen Sorensen

Jeff Stahler

Jeff Stahler

Scott Stantis

Scott Stantis

(th)ink

(th)ink

By Keith Knight
Tom Toles

Tom Toles

Gary Varvel

Gary Varvel

Signe Wilkinson

Signe Wilkinson

Matt Wuerker

Matt Wuerker

ViewsAfrica

ViewsAfrica

By CartoonArts International
ViewsAmerica

ViewsAmerica

By CartoonArts International
ViewsAsia

ViewsAsia

By CartoonArts International
ViewsBusiness

ViewsBusiness

By CartoonArts International
ViewsEurope

ViewsEurope

By CartoonArts International
ViewsLatinAmerica

ViewsLatinAmerica

By CartoonArts International
ViewsMidEast

ViewsMidEast

By CartoonArts International
Views of the World

Views of the World

By CartoonArts International

Recent Comments

  1. about 13 hours ago on Over the Hedge

    (cont.)

    I also briefly want to address your statement that “realistically, such a belief [atheism] doesn’t last very long.” I beg to differ, in that atheism is perhaps as old a belief system as any. The Epicureans in Classical Greece dabbled in atheism (carefully, since it was a capital offense), and Psalm 14 begins “The fool hath said in his heart: There is no God.” That could hardly have been written if the Psalmist hadn’t run across a few atheists. Conceptions of God have come and gone, but atheism keeps popping up. I imagine that the fist time someone pointed to the sky and said “gods live there,” someone was around thinking “nah, I don’t buy it.”

  2. about 14 hours ago on Over the Hedge

    I agree that we have difficulty perceiving time as anything other than linear, and I note that both science and theology can accommodate “time and space” as both being properties of the “created” universe.

    Yet I find “God did it” to be an unsatisfying response, if only because the concept of “God” is so ill-defined as either mean everything or nothing, depending on the need of the one invoking it. The existence of God (or gods) can neither be proven nor disproven, and again I side with Thomas Huxley in that, where there is no evidence either way, science has nothing to say.

    Again, if you say “it can hardly be otherwise,” my response is “we don’t have all the information yet,” but with the addition “we still have a hell of a lot more information than we did 200 years ago, so who knows what we’ll have 200 years from today?”

    I’ve been getting some traction lately with Spinoza’s God (when Einstein was asked whether he believed in God, he answered “I believe in Spinoza’s God”). Spinoza’s God is literally everything, and nothing can exist that is not “within God.” But Spinoza’s God would hardly qualify as “God” for most believers: God is not moral, as both “good” and “bad” are “within God.” God takes no interest in human affairs or human destiny; whatever we do and however we end is “within God.” The laws of math, physics, chemistry, and biology are not SUBJECT to God or CREATIONS of God, they are simply “within God,” and the highest (only) form of worship is to come to know God by learning science. Spinoza strenuously objected to being called an atheist, and in fact his detractors sometimes referred to him as "that God-besotted man,: since he saw God literally everywhere.

    (cont.)

  3. about 14 hours ago on Pooch Cafe

    And some snakes are remarkable adders.

  4. about 20 hours ago on Over the Hedge

    As posted above, we understand a lot more about gravity than we used to.

    For eons, we’d known that what goes up must come down, but we had no real grasp of how or why. Then Galileo demonstrated that at least there was uniformity, and Newton worked out that it’s a combination of mass and the inverse square rule. If gravity operates “because God wills it so,” at least He makes it work the same damn way every damn time. We still didn’t know why massive objects attract each other, but then along comes Einstein who says it’s because mass causes warping in space-time(or some such; I’m not a physicist), and he appears to be correct.

    Science doesn’t know everything and perhaps it never will, but just because the goal posts keep being pushed back (and scientists do their OWN part in pushing them back) it doesn’t mean there isn’t forward motion.

  5. about 20 hours ago on Pooch Cafe

    Perhaps, but he’d do them anyway. He’d go down to Pooch Cafe and complain: “You wouldn’t BELIEVE the state of his receipts! It took me hours to get them straightened out… And he wouldn’t recognize a deductible business expense if it bit him in the ass. Well, to be fair, I’m a deductible business expense and after I bit him in the ass it finally sunk in. JUST LIKE MY TEETH! Ha! A little accounting joke, there…”

  6. about 20 hours ago on Agnes

    That’s my point. If you know Agnes, you know of her alter ego Wellness Woman, who lives for this kind of thing.

  7. about 22 hours ago on Pooch Cafe

    Maybe a border collie could do them.

  8. about 22 hours ago on Overboard

    I don’t care for the character, but dropping him in a tub of acid seems harsh.

    Besides, if you use the wrong kind of tub the acid will eat through it, then eat through the deck, then eat through the hull of the ship, like on Breaking Bad. Not a safe thing to try when you’re miles out to sea.

  9. 1 day ago on Over the Hedge

    I would suggest that comprehension follows initial misconceptions, in that you usually have to look into the wrong answers in order to find the right ones. If we know more now than we did 1000 years ago, or 300 years ago, or 50 years ago, it’s because we started working from unproven hypotheses.

  10. 1 day ago on Pooch Cafe

    Eh. If you tell a dog to do your taxes and the dog screws it up, you have only yourself to blame.