Video snapshot

Baslim the Beggar Premium

Nothing to see here. Keep Calm and Move On. . To Keep Calm, only read the funnies and ignore the editorials and all comments. . Then you can Move On with a serene and happy heart.

Comics I Follow

Yaffle

Yaffle

By Jeffrey Caulfield and Brian Ponshock
Widdershins

Widdershins

By Kate Ashwin
M2Bulls

M2Bulls

By Marty Two Bulls Sr.
The Middle Age

The Middle Age

By Steve Conley
Two Party Opera

Two Party Opera

By Brian Carroll
Pibgorn

Pibgorn

By Brooke McEldowney
9 Chickweed Lane

9 Chickweed Lane

By Brooke McEldowney
Non Sequitur

Non Sequitur

By Wiley Miller
Frazz

Frazz

By Jef Mallett
Bloom County 2019

Bloom County 2019

By Berkeley Breathed
Dark Side of the Horse

Dark Side of the Horse

By Samson
Luann

Luann

By Greg Evans
C'est la Vie

C'est la Vie

By Jennifer Babcock
MythTickle

MythTickle

By Justin Thompson
Lio

Lio

By Mark Tatulli
Tarzan

Tarzan

By Edgar Rice Burroughs
Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

By T Lewis and Michael Fry
Doonesbury

Doonesbury

By Garry Trudeau
Frank and Ernest

Frank and Ernest

By Thaves
JumpStart

JumpStart

By Robb Armstrong
Shoe

Shoe

By Gary Brookins and Susie MacNelly
Garfield

Garfield

By Jim Davis
Ink Pen

Ink Pen

By Phil Dunlap
Pickles

Pickles

By Brian Crane
Stone Soup

Stone Soup

By Jan Eliot
Rose is Rose

Rose is Rose

By Don Wimmer and Pat Brady
Endtown

Endtown

By Aaron Neathery
Brewster Rockit

Brewster Rockit

By Tim Rickard
Overboard

Overboard

By Chip Dunham
Dogs of C-Kennel

Dogs of C-Kennel

By Mick & Mason Mastroianni
HUBRIS!

HUBRIS!

By Greg Cravens
Red and Rover

Red and Rover

By Brian Basset
That is Priceless

That is Priceless

By Steve Melcher
The LeftyBosco Picture Show

The LeftyBosco Picture Show

By Keith DuQuette
Frog Applause

Frog Applause

By Teresa Burritt
Calvin and Hobbes

Calvin and Hobbes

By Bill Watterson
For Better or For Worse

For Better or For Worse

By Lynn Johnston
FoxTrot Classics

FoxTrot Classics

By Bill Amend
Bloom County

Bloom County

By Berkeley Breathed
Jane's World

Jane's World

By Paige Braddock
New Adventures of Queen Victoria

New Adventures of Queen Victoria

By Pab Sungenis
The Last Mechanical Monster

The Last Mechanical Monster

By Brian Fies
The Martian Confederacy

The Martian Confederacy

By Paige Braddock and Jason McNamara
Herman

Herman

By Jim Unger
Brevity

Brevity

By Dan Thompson
Close to Home

Close to Home

By John McPherson
Last Kiss

Last Kiss

By John Lustig
Compu-toon

Compu-toon

By Charles Boyce
B.C.

B.C.

By Mastroianni and Hart
Pibgorn Sketches

Pibgorn Sketches

By Brooke McEldowney
The Argyle Sweater

The Argyle Sweater

By Scott Hilburn
Ballard Street

Ballard Street

By Jerry Van Amerongen
F Minus

F Minus

By Tony Carrillo
Strange Brew

Strange Brew

By John Deering
WuMo

WuMo

By Wulff & Morgenthaler
Kid Beowulf

Kid Beowulf

By Alexis E. Fajardo
Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal

By Zach Weinersmith
Working Daze

Working Daze

By John Zakour and Scott Roberts
Little Nemo

Little Nemo

By Winsor McCay
Jim Benton Cartoons

Jim Benton Cartoons

By Jim Benton
Nothing is Not Something

Nothing is Not Something

By Greg Wallace
Warped

Warped

By Michael Cavna

Recent Comments

  1. about 9 hours ago on Jeff Danziger

    He’s holding a slice of pizza in his left hand (box is by mom’s leg). The bottle says More XXX. I would assume it is a beer, from the bottle, but maybe not. The XXX implying a “hopped up” beer? ;^)

  2. about 14 hours ago on Jeff Danziger

    Love the details — and that sour expression on his face.

  3. 1 day ago on Robert Ariail

    First point: The blueprints for the F1 engine exist, but it would not make sense to use them to build new engines. As the video at the link below makes clear, the process of building the engines was very intensive of skilled workers and engineers. Manufacturing processes have had 50 years to improve.An equally powerful engine could be created that would have far fewer parts and would be cheaper.

    https://space.stackexchange.com/questions/20302/were-the-saturn-v-construction-plans-destroyed

    I just finished Ben Rich’s book “Skunk Works.” To his dismay, a decision was made to destroy the tools used to build the SR-71 back in the 80s. No more were to be built. Part of this is that Skunk Works tended to build prototypes “by hand.” They could easily adapt to making necessary changes. Some brass did not like that. Brass want new stuff with regularity. But they are forced by reality to keep on some old planes. B-52s. U-2s, Hercules Cargo planes. The latter still being manufactured when other more recent planes are not. No more C-17s for example. A lot has to do with colonels wanting to be generals because they had a new program.

    What was the upside of Apollo for Nixon? Kennedy (and Johnson) got credit. No glory for Tricky Dick in continuing their programs. OK maybe a little for SpaceLab if Nixon had not been stupid and got his butt kicked out of the WH. But some folks in NASA wanted the Space Shuttle, and they made a deal with the military, promising lots of military launches real often. The military got some missions but ended up staying with rockets like the Delta-III and then the Delta_IV. And NASA’s deputy program managers want to be program managers for new programs.

    Oh, and for a while, I worked for what was Rocketdyne (after it was acquired by Boeing). I did not work on the rocket engines, but we’d hear whenever a foreign object was found in a rocket engine. That was 20 years ago. Any new design that requires less human work means fewer problems

  4. 1 day ago on Endtown

    Ruh-Roh!

    Hopefully, Wally still has his dittos. And hopefully they can distract the Eye Or disable the topsider. The bad news, they are in a room isolated from the usual surveillance. Help will not come soon. On the other hand, the Eye does like to gloat. And Duffy has his amulet. Gonna be a long weekend…

  5. 1 day ago on Clay Jones

    Where is Bill Murray when you really need him?

  6. 1 day ago on MythTickle

    Miracle-Grow?

  7. 2 days ago on Michael Ramirez

    I was not being condescending. If you want to cite land use by renewable energy sources, you should always compare what the fossil fuels do. And I did not even mention the way coal is now mined.

    And then there are the uranium mines (mostly not in the US anymore).

    And do take a look at google maps.

    But “climate scientologist” is pretty damn rude. Oh, and I do know more than most about climate. From graduate course work in geophysical fluid dynamics and physics of climate to actual research on atmospheric turbulence and using weather models (whose underlying physics also underlies climate models) to predict turbulence.

    I do not have to be a biologist to understand the changes to plants and animals arising from climate change. I only need understand that contrary to the claims of deniers (who are generally found on the right wing), the people reporting those changes have nothing to do with the prediction of climate, but everything to do with reporting changes they observe in the field.

  8. 2 days ago on Michael Ramirez

    Well if you want to amuse yourself regarding land use, use google maps to look at West Texas. I haven’t tried to estimate the number of pumps per square mile, but it is significant. And each pump has an square of scraped ground around it, with access road (also scraped). I first noticed this flying from Houston to LA in 2014. From 30,000+ feet you see a lot, but much, much more with google maps.

    Eastern New Mexico as well. Also western North Dakota. And California, but no so concntrated.

    That’s an enormous area scraped of vegetation. And those pumps will not be perfectly silent either. And of course pipelines.

    In 1964, Arthur C. Clarke published Profiles of the Future. He expected fusion reactors in 20 years.

    A story I heard from a physicist who had been at the Institute for Advanced Studies at the time when John von Neumann was there concerned “the von Neumann constant.” Basically it said that some projects time to completion starts large but then asymptotically approaches a fixed value. In the case of fusion it has been 20 years, but maybe looks more like 30.

    I listened last week to a briefing about getting the US energy grid ready for fusion reactors. They were talking small scale reactor(s) by 2050. Based on magnetic confinement fusion, not inertial confinement fusion (with lasers).

  9. 2 days ago on Michael Ramirez

    You have weakened your argument considerably by referring to coal. Coal is indeed on the way out, but yielding mostly to natural gas (methane). Your overly casual dismissal of solar and wind are also wrong. What the Texas incident proved is that they are better when part of a much larger network than the one in Texas. And Texas has no storage capacity, such as hydro. Maybe Elon Musk will sell them some of his super-batteries, such as he sold Australia.

    That said, I am also (and have said it on this forum for more than a decade) a proponent of the new fission reactors whose failure mode is to shut down the power generation without depending on methods that have been proven to fail. Even the nuclear industry got the message from Fukushima. It wasn’t the mag 9 earthquake, or the tsunami that killed 15,000 that did in the reactors there. It was that the local backup electric generation was knocked out AND the regional power network. Those activ measures backups were needed to make the reactors safe. The newer designs require no active measures. The reactions will shut down. No hydrogen gas generated to explode the reactor.

    And the number of people killed by radiation from Fukushima? In 2018, the first radiation death was recorded. Expectations are no more than about a dozen. And that is from people who worked at the plant.

    And it is fusion not fission that is at least 20-30 years off.

    Baslim (Physics PhD)

  10. 2 days ago on Chip Bok

    yes, criminally stupid.