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Baslim the Beggar Premium

Nothing to see here. Keep Calm and Move On. . To Keep Calm, only read the funnies and ignore the editorials and all comments. . Then you can Move On with a serene and happy heart.

Comics I Follow

The Middle Age

The Middle Age

By Steve Conley
Two Party Opera

Two Party Opera

By Brian Carroll
Edge of Adventure

Edge of Adventure

By James Allen and Brice Vorderbrug
Pibgorn

Pibgorn

By Brooke McEldowney
9 Chickweed Lane

9 Chickweed Lane

By Brooke McEldowney
Non Sequitur

Non Sequitur

By Wiley Miller
Frazz

Frazz

By Jef Mallett
Bloom County 2018

Bloom County 2018

By Berkeley Breathed
Dark Side of the Horse

Dark Side of the Horse

By Samson
Luann

Luann

By Greg Evans
C'est la Vie

C'est la Vie

By Jennifer Babcock
MythTickle

MythTickle

By Justin Thompson
Lio

Lio

By Mark Tatulli
Alley Oop

Alley Oop

By Jonathan Lemon and Joey Alison Sayers
Tarzan

Tarzan

By Edgar Rice Burroughs
Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

By T Lewis and Michael Fry
Doonesbury

Doonesbury

By Garry Trudeau
Frank and Ernest

Frank and Ernest

By Thaves
JumpStart

JumpStart

By Robb Armstrong
Shoe

Shoe

By Gary Brookins and Susie MacNelly
Garfield

Garfield

By Jim Davis
Ink Pen

Ink Pen

By Phil Dunlap
Pickles

Pickles

By Brian Crane
Stone Soup

Stone Soup

By Jan Eliot
Rose is Rose

Rose is Rose

By Don Wimmer and Pat Brady
Endtown

Endtown

By Aaron Neathery
Brewster Rockit

Brewster Rockit

By Tim Rickard
Overboard

Overboard

By Chip Dunham
Dogs of C-Kennel

Dogs of C-Kennel

By Mick & Mason Mastroianni
HUBRIS!

HUBRIS!

By Greg Cravens
Red and Rover

Red and Rover

By Brian Basset
That is Priceless

That is Priceless

By Steve Melcher
The LeftyBosco Picture Show

The LeftyBosco Picture Show

By Keith DuQuette
Frog Applause

Frog Applause

By Teresa Burritt
Calvin and Hobbes

Calvin and Hobbes

By Bill Watterson
For Better or For Worse

For Better or For Worse

By Lynn Johnston
FoxTrot Classics

FoxTrot Classics

By Bill Amend
Bloom County

Bloom County

By Berkeley Breathed
Jane's World

Jane's World

By Paige Braddock
Microcosm

Microcosm

By Hadria Beth
New Adventures of Queen Victoria

New Adventures of Queen Victoria

By Pab Sungenis
TOBY

TOBY

By Corey Pandolph
The Last Mechanical Monster

The Last Mechanical Monster

By Brian Fies
The Martian Confederacy

The Martian Confederacy

By Paige Braddock and Jason McNamara
Drive

Drive

By Dave Kellett
Herman

Herman

By Jim Unger
Brevity

Brevity

By Dan Thompson
Close to Home

Close to Home

By John McPherson
Last Kiss

Last Kiss

By John Lustig
Compu-toon

Compu-toon

By Charles Boyce
B.C.

B.C.

By Mastroianni and Hart
Pibgorn Sketches

Pibgorn Sketches

By Brooke McEldowney
The Argyle Sweater

The Argyle Sweater

By Scott Hilburn
Ballard Street

Ballard Street

By Jerry Van Amerongen
Tim Eagan

Tim Eagan

F Minus

F Minus

By Tony Carrillo
The Conjurers

The Conjurers

By Brian Anderson
Human Cull

Human Cull

By Alex Hallatt
Strange Brew

Strange Brew

By John Deering
WuMo

WuMo

By Wulff & Morgenthaler
Kid Beowulf

Kid Beowulf

By Alexis E. Fajardo
Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal

By Zach Weinersmith
Working Daze

Working Daze

By John Zakour and Scott Roberts
Little Nemo

Little Nemo

By Winsor McCay
Jim Benton Cartoons

Jim Benton Cartoons

By Jim Benton
Nothing is Not Something

Nothing is Not Something

By Greg Wallace
Warped

Warped

By Michael Cavna
Now Recharging

Now Recharging

By Maiji/Mary Huang

Recent Comments

  1. about 15 hours ago on Nick Anderson

    I think the Brexit people think the top image still applies…

  2. 1 day ago on Working Daze

    Nice touch with the cyclist!

  3. 1 day ago on Frank and Ernest

    It’s all in how you frame the argument…

  4. 1 day ago on Non Sequitur

    Oh, Absolutely Brilliant, Mr. Miller!

  5. 1 day ago on Frog Applause

    Attention! Attention, Froglanders!

    Today is World Frog Day!

    Hop to it, Froglanders! Show your love before you croak!

  6. 1 day ago on Robert Ariail

    Martens posted a link which contained the following quip:

    “Criticizing Trump in a book is just unfair. It’s like criticizing the Amish on television.”

    Which is a real winner. But interestingly, the source was one of the Russian accounts from St. Petersberg….

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/russian-trolls-can-be-surprisingly-subtle-and-often-fun-to-read/2019/03/08/677f8ec2-413c-11e9-9361-301ffb5bd5e6_story.html

  7. 2 days ago on Matt Davies

    @Motive, It’s no use talking to Andy. He knows the UN black helicopters are coming to take away his wealth.

  8. 4 days ago on Endtown

    I was not convinced at first that it was a Topsider, even after Chic said so. But I went back a few years (Feb 25, 2014) to when Wally was talking with Jim & Sarah. It was then clear that what we saw on March 6th was a Topsider suit.

    And Wally cut open the suits of Jim & Sarah quite easily, so the switchblade would have worked.

    So it was a Topsider, unarmed, and consequently afraid of the knife. This is not a good development for Eden.

  9. 4 days ago on Brian McFadden

    LeMay had nothing to do with Dresden. His domain was the Pacific.

    A very good history of the bombing in Europe is found in Max Hastings’ Bomber Command. You will find that it was the Brits (and not all of them) who were wedded to area bombing. The Americans eventually engaged as well, but the AAF really did want to go after specific targets. The problem was that there was never good follow-up. Estimates of damage done tended to greatly exaggerate the efficacy of bombing, “Bomber” Harris (Brit) refused to engage in attacks on synthetic oil production facilities until Eisenhower finally came down hard on him. Those raids really hurt the Germans, but as usual, they were not kept up as they should have been.

    The German firestorms happened for essentially the same reason as the Tokyo firestorm. The bombers targeted city centers, which were rich in old wooden buildings. It was relatively easy to find a city center, but manufacturing tended to not be there, but dispersed in the newer parts of the city (which did not burn as well). Tokyo, of course, was even more widely flammable. And there really were small machine shops etc supporting the war effort spread out through them.

    The real crime of the European bombing campaign was that the area bombing continued because the metric was how many buildings destroyed, something easier to count from the air. Hastings book makes it clear that US policies — if they had been kept up — would have led to the war ending sooner. But there is a lot of blame to go around.

    In the Pacific, the greatest damage done to the Japanese in their homeland was the destruction of their shipping in and around Japanese waters. This included mines laid from aircraft. But again, the effects are a bit harder to assess from afar and from the air. So area bombing continued.

  10. 5 days ago on Warped

    Sir Alec had a nice collection of vinyl music so large that he kept a book listing them…

    The Guiness Book of Records