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Brewster Rockit by Tim Rickard for October 14, 2012

34 Comments

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  1. Emerald
    margueritem  over 6 years ago

    Oh, that would be torture of the most painful sort.

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  2. Bluedog
    Bilan  over 6 years ago

    Didn’t they say that in space no one can hear Muzak?

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  3. Rabbitears
    Nabuquduriuzhur  over 6 years ago

    What happens when the doors open, after what looks like 9000 miles?

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  4. Louie avatar
    luckylouie  over 6 years ago

    Does anyone know why it would have to be on a mobile sea base? That’s a new one on me. Everything I’ve read says that it would be anchored on land, at the equator. (Ecuador and Kenya are frequently mentioned as bases.)

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    cloa513  over 6 years ago

    I would have thought the best place would be a high altitude airship (airplatform). Less technical difficulties with creating such a thing and less difficulties with the elevator passing through less atmosphere.

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    frumdebang  over 6 years ago

    Good time to buy stock in carbon nanotubes.

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  7. Madmen icon
    McSpook  over 6 years ago

    My hope would be that they would include a bit of retro kitch, like a mouthy young elevator operator who would make continuous annoncements like “576,321st floor, Communications satellites, antique Sputniks, laser weapons platforms and ladies shoes. All out please.”

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  8. Coolrlcrop
    Coyoty Premium Member over 6 years ago

    A space escalator would be more interesting. What do you mean it’s not possible? You’re not buying a stairway to Heaven?

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  9. Phil b r
    pbarnrob  over 6 years ago

    Several authors have used the trope; Sir Arthur of course, Kim Stanley Robinson put one on Mars for his colonists, I’m just now reading a Joe Haldeman (Marsbound , first of a trilogy); his is based on or near the Galapagos, West of Ecuador. Actually, there’s a bunch in fiction.In the Real World, the preliminary engineering work is underway (see Space Elevator Ref. ) and has annual conferences. Strength of materials is now the main limiting factor.The reason for the counterweight is to keep the ‘beanstalk’ taut (ahem, rather than teach it anything)…

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    justalurkr  over 6 years ago

    Beautifully simple explanation of the concept, with one egregious misspelling ( that I caught.)

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  11. Rugeirn
    rugeirn  over 6 years ago

    The “Rockiteers” are young people, right? Why is someone as obviously evil as Dr. Mel invited to address such a group? Might as well have Charles Manson come to the local Cub Scout troop.

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    marty1192  over 6 years ago

    Are we there yet? Are we there yet?Are we there yet?Are we there yet?…

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    Meatpuppet  over 6 years ago

    (1) Taut is misspelled. (2) Passing gas in the elevator now becomes a capital offense.

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  14. United federation
    corzak  over 6 years ago

    They would make it like a Disney ride . . . filled with animatronic birds, flowers and other props, singing and talking. Like the Enchanted Tiki Room at Disneyland.

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  15. Avatar 3
    pcolli  over 6 years ago

    “Up, up and away in my beautiful space elevator…”

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    GoodQuestion Premium Member over 6 years ago

    I think audiobooks could fill the void . . say Gilbert Gottfried reading War & Peace to pass the time . . . . ☻

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  17. Catclaw
    ckham  over 6 years ago

    So, my question would be which fire department will come and rescue you if you push the alarm button?

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    SplashPal  over 6 years ago

    The space elevator won’t work as there will be no change in angular momentum as the elevator rises (without side-thrusting rockets) thus it will slow down in the horizontal direction, dragging the counterweight out of orbit and CRASHING – ta ta.

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  19. Dscn7190 small
    stuart  over 6 years ago

    Climbing a space elevator drains the earth’s rotational energy by an infinitesimal amount. The more we use it, the longer a day becomes (making leap seconds more frequent). On that note, the moon is doing something similar, and moving away from the earth.

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  20. Missing large
    dumbbobsbrother  over 6 years ago

    The horror, the horror.

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  21. Ibot large
    CaptD  over 6 years ago

    Expect the speed of climb to increase as the elevator rises and “weight” has less effect… Imagine a late afternoon “Launch” so you could initially watch the scenery as you climbed into the sky, then a very long amazing sunset before the “curve” of the Earth came into view…

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  22. Ibot large
    CaptD  over 6 years ago

    Salute to Tim Rickard…Hope you will consider a iMac version of your eBook and or a kindle version…

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  23. Rabbitears
    Nabuquduriuzhur  over 6 years ago

    It would be much easier to recreate some of JPL’s technologies lost when Congress killed nuclear propulsion in space in 1986..Take a submarine nuclear reactor, use it for the heat source for an argon gas core engine. Argon is an almost inert gas (almost, because with high enough energies, compounds can be formed) that makes up 0.93 of the atmosphere. While a reactor typically is around 600 degrees, use heat exchangers to raise the temperature of the argon to plasma (which would also provide cooling for the reactor as convection is pretty hard to come by in vacuum) and eject a very small stream of the resulting gas as propulsion..The thrust would only be a fraction of a g, say 1/4, but in an HTOL configuration, such a craft takes off like a medium-sized jet.

    So, how do you reach the 25,000 mph needed to escape the atmosphere? Same way as a conventional rocket does— by acceleration— but it would take hours instead of minutes. At 1/4 g acceleration, the craft would climb higher and faster and eventually would reach the 25,000 mph mark and “break away” from the Earth..It would actually be far easier to build a small shuttle, say the size of a gulfstream, to reach the ISS. It would be far cheaper than the 1.2 billion dollars for each shuttle flight, and while the gas would need refilling each trip, the fuel rods wouldn’t need replacing years (consider how many years a sub can run without replacement and the reactor is up almost all of that time). Fuel savings.

    Refining millions of pounds of hydrogen and oxygen and creating the massive amounts of solid fuel for conventional space shuttle flights is where much of that incredible cost for the shuttle came from.

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  24. Ibot large
    CaptD  over 6 years ago

    Nice posting…

    RE: Robinson, he actually wrote a chapter in Liftports Book: Opening Space To Everyone http://is.gd/gHJEPt explaining the reasons that the Mars series is far different from a Lunar elevator!

    RE: Using Geo vs. 60,000 miles:1. The Center of Mass is in the same point with both.2. There are trade offs in having a larger mass (asteroid) at the end of a shorter line vs. a much longer line with a man-made object at the end…

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  25. Ibot large
    CaptD  over 6 years ago

    Please see my reply below…

    I’m sorry we can’t put comments where they belong!

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