Ted Rall by Ted Rall

Ted Rall

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  1. Obama Is Da Man

    Obama Is Da Man said, over 2 years ago

    What’s poor taste is killing millions of innocent Iraqis for their oil…

  2. MortyForTyrant

    MortyForTyrant said, over 2 years ago

    This ruling is really strange, from an European point of view. I hope there will be a lot of civil cases against the liars. If I hire a vet I want him to be a vet, because they embody certain principles. If I find out a year or two later that he never was, or did not have the decorations he claimed, I would fire him and then file for retroactive reduction of payment, i.e. claim back a significant amount of his salary. That would teach them!

  3. walruscarver2000

    walruscarver2000 said, over 2 years ago

    Given the leaning of the majority of the court, are you really surprised that they would support the "right to lie’?

  4. packratjohn

    packratjohn said, over 2 years ago

    Reminds me of an old Perry Mason episode where Perry lied to a cop during an investigation. When called on it, he said simply “I wasn’t under oath.” Plain and simple fact. Of course, these days he’d be charged with obstruction or impeding an investigation. Guess it depends on who you lie to.

  5. fritzoid

    fritzoid GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    I agree with rightisright on this one; this one is a slam dunk. Of course lying is protected by the First Amendment. If you’re lying while under oath (perjury) or falsifying an official form (fraud), then you can be prosecuted, but we’ve always had laws against those, and those still stand.


    Pretending to be a veteran when you aren’t is no different than pretending you’ve been to college when you haven’t, and claiming to be a decorated war hero (“Stolen Valor”) is no different than claiming you graduated cum laude from Harvard.


    If we’re talking about lying on a job application or something like that, the person who was lied to has certain recourses if the truth is discovered, but it’s rarely (if ever) a criminal matter, and the person who was lied to has both an interest in and an obligation to VERIFY the information before the fact.

  6. braindead08

    braindead08 GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    Jackie Vernon’s favorite pickup line: Is that my Congressional Medal of Honor under your barstool?

  7. MortyForTyrant

    MortyForTyrant said, over 2 years ago

    Excuse me, I am not an American, how can you verify the information? If lying verbally and on an application form is not criminal, then lying on any form of paper, i.e. falsifying a document, must be alright too, correct? And making a CMOH out of clay and paint or buying a fake on e-bay is okay as well, in your mind, right? So the only way to verify it would be with the army, and they can’t give you anything because of privacy concerns (if I’m not mistaken). So, again, how do you verify?

  8. dtroutma

    dtroutma GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    FRAUD, is still illegal. If all the “wannabes” who claim to have received the Medal of Honor ( the point of the law) or performed other “heroic acts” were jailed, we’d be building a lot more jails. Real combat veterans quickly spot the phonies, and they ARE disgusting, but unless they attempt to defraud for gain, it’s just disgusting, not illegal.


    BTW, many, if not most, actual combat veterans ARE “anti-war”, but not pacifists. Even Colin Powell, and a number of other generals, over many years, have pointed out that their REAL job is to secure PEACE, not just wage war.


    Which is exactly why chickenhawks out to START wars (for profit), are so offensive to us.

  9. jackson49

    jackson49 said, over 2 years ago

    as in the police state we have become, SOME are MORE equal

  10. jackson49

    jackson49 said, over 2 years ago

    as a vietnam vet i never took nor applied for ANY vet ‘benefits’.

    too many still are self brainwashed; watch them PARADE their illness, and are applauded by mindless ’citizens" as the world slips into royal oil wars, yr STILL paying for their wars….yr still paying fed phone taxes for sir kissingers 40 billion$ ’settlements"-Vietnam, and the constant warmongering has wrecked our Republic.

  11. jackson49

    jackson49 said, over 2 years ago

    ‘special’ and ‘extra’ benefits for who? costofwar.com, and tell me …

  12. fritzoid

    fritzoid GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    @MortyForTyrant

    “Excuse me, I am not an American, how can you verify the information? … So the only way to verify it would be with the army, and they can’t give you anything because of privacy concerns (if I’m not mistaken). So, again, how do you verify?”


    Some things can be verified, and some things can’t. The example you gave above was giving a guy a job because he is (or claims) to be a veteran. If you go to the Army, they may not be able to release his entire service record, but they can confirm (or deny) that he served, they may be able to tell you whether he was discharged honorably or dishonorably, and if your guy claimed to have been awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor, they’d probably be able to tell you that. Again, it’s like a University degree; they don’t keep their lists of graduates (distinguished or otherwise) a secret, but they may not release all of his records. And again, if somebody lies on his resume to get a job, and the truth comes out after the fact, it is grounds for dismissal, and there may be some civil recourse available to you, but it isn’t a criminal offense.


    “If lying verbally and on an application form is not criminal, then lying on any form of paper, i.e. falsifying a document, must be alright too, correct?”


    There are many things which I don’t think are OK, but which I still don’t believe should be illegal. Adultery, for instance. If your spouse cheats on you, it’s grounds for divorce, but it isn’t a criminal offense nor should it be. Perhaps flag-burning is an appropriate parallel; I don’t approve of it, but making it illegal would be an offense against the very liberties it’s supposed to represent. As far as falsifying a document goes, it depends on the document. You can’t falsify a birth certificate, or a driver’s license, or a Social Security card, because those are official means of identification; they have the weight of authority. But if you make up a fake diploma from Harvard, I don’t believe that is, in itself, a criminal act.

  13. fritzoid

    fritzoid GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    PS: I don’t mean to be rude, but if you’re in the habit of hiring people on the basis of information that can’t be verified (or that you don’t bother to verify), you may want to reconsider that policy.

  14. mattro53

    mattro53 said, over 2 years ago

    I’m surprised there are no comments on the theme of this cartoon or that the logo under the name of the bar says it all when it comes to the essence of politics in this country. Nice one, Ted.

  15. wmbrainiac

    wmbrainiac said, over 2 years ago

    free speech in the german constitution does not protect lying. this is how they are able to prevent publication of books denying the holocaust. were our 1st amendment to be revised along these lines, we could prevent access to the public by fox.

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