Frazz by Jef Mallett

Frazz

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  1. Fairportfan2

    Fairportfan2 said, over 1 year ago

    Why do you diagram sentences, Caulfield?
    .
    To learn the basic mechanics of the English language, perhaps, so that you don’t sound like the a huge percentage of the posters (both left- and right-wing) if you choose to make a comment on the political cartoons on GoComics?

  2. Night-Gaunt49

    Night-Gaunt49 said, over 1 year ago

    I would suggest that Caufield learned this the first day or even before he came to formal schooling. He finds it pointless to do it again and again. He picks it up quickly.

  3. ReneTray

    ReneTray said, over 1 year ago

    @Fairportfan2

    Yes.

  4. ReneTray

    ReneTray said, over 1 year ago

    And by his statements it discourages the other children to learn and keeping them from gaining the benefits of an education. Whch helps you gain a job in the first place.

  5. Alexikakos

    Alexikakos said, over 1 year ago

    I think diagramming is the dumbing down way of saying parse. (Because we can’t expect no children to learn good English right no-how.)
    It’s no wonder the newspapers are going from grade 8 to grade 6.

  6. KeepKeeper

    KeepKeeper said, over 1 year ago

    Caulfield will make a good politician. He can aggrandize many options, but never reach a solution

  7. Arianne

    Arianne said, over 1 year ago

    What a great line!
    The squeaky wheel gets the grease. Most kids learn that early on.

  8. Editer63

    Editer63 said, over 1 year ago

    Best description of economics I ever heard was “quantitative psychology”.

  9. Nachikethass

    Nachikethass said, over 1 year ago

    For the first time since I started reading Frazz, I felt that Caulfield is being a little pain.
    I have had wiseacres in my class when I was a teacher. Up to a point, you enjoy them – they are called bright and witty then. They liven up the class. Brings out new viewpoints.
    But after a certain point, they are being unfair to those kids who are a bit less quicker in picking things up. They feel stupid and close down.

  10. neatslob

    neatslob said, over 1 year ago

    They actually do diagram sentence structure. And I doubt he learned how to do it as a preschooler.

    And by the way, supply is generally adjusted to satisfy demand, rather than vice versa.

  11. puddleglum1066

    puddleglum1066 said, over 1 year ago

    Well, look at it this way: Caulfield’s been repeating this grade for at least ten years now (note that “Frazz” received an award in 2003, so the strip must have been in print at that time), and while his body hasn’t grown at all, his mind has now matured to the point of a college sophomore. I can see how having to repeat sentence diagramming yet again just might be getting to him.


    If Dante were writing today, I’m pretty sure he’d add a bolgia in which the condemned spend eternity living the same year of their life over and over and over. It would be reserved for the people who write TV sitcoms, of course.

  12. vwdualnomand

    vwdualnomand said, over 1 year ago

    what was the point of diagramming a sentence?

  13. TheSkulker

    TheSkulker GoComics PRO Member said, over 1 year ago

    @Fairportfan2

    Why do you diagram sentences, Caulfield?
    To learn the basic mechanics of the English language, perhaps


    And just perhaps there are other ways to learn that don’t involve diagrams.


    My English teachers never covered diagraming sentences so I had to learn by reading and emulating the masters – Wells, Silverberg, Heinlien and Asimov, et al. What sounds right to me seems to match the formal rules of grammar embodied in the syntax of the English language. I am no William Buckley but I think I have done OK.


    Although I may not know the proper names for all the syntactical units of the language or be able to clearly define the difference between a direct and indirect object, I do know how to construct a proper sentence and when to use “your” vs “you’re” properly as well as “there”, “their” and "they’re; “between” and “among”; “who” and “whom”; “good” and “well” and a host of other such “mysteries” that seem to have escaped the capabilities of those who, supposedly, have learned sentence diagraming. (Unfortunately, I also tend to write long sentences!)


    The difference between “your” and “you’re” is so simple and easy to understand, yet their misuse is so prevalent, that one really has to question an educational system that allows such travesties to continue.

    Now if this post does not set me up as a target for dart practice, I don’t know what would!
    Namaste’, Art

  14. luvcmx

    luvcmx said, over 1 year ago

    @TheSkulker

    Among you and me I think that their are some mistakes in what your trying to said.

  15. magicwalnut

    magicwalnut GoComics PRO Member said, over 1 year ago

    They don’t do that in schools any more. Pity. It’s tough teaching grammar to graduate students who should have learned it in elementary school. Especially when they will be responsible for teaching it to others……

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