Dark Side of the Horse by Samson

Dark Side of the Horse

Comments (16) (Please sign in to comment)

  1. Nabuquduriuzhur

    Nabuquduriuzhur said, over 1 year ago

    then a panel with Horace colored white with the caption “Gesso”

  2. Sherlock Watson

    Sherlock Watson said, over 1 year ago

    Good to the last drop?

  3. Bartholomew Orso

    Bartholomew Orso said, over 1 year ago

    And of course there’s another panel somewhere with Horace on an oil planet…“ESSO” (old name for Exxon ;-D).

  4. Bailey

    Bailey said, over 1 year ago

    @Sherlock Watson

    “Good to the last drop?”
    -
    Maybe… “good ‘til it’s been dropped”…!

  5. Ryan (Say what now‽)

    Ryan (Say what now‽) GoComics PRO Member said, over 1 year ago

    Even the baristas at Starbucks pronounce it as expresso. It drives me a little crazy.

  6. cdward

    cdward said, over 1 year ago

    Followed by Compresso, when another horse trips over him and lands on top of him.

  7. TheWildSow

    TheWildSow said, over 1 year ago

    @Bartholomew Orso

    Esso = S.O. = Standard Oil

  8. Saskfan

    Saskfan said, over 1 year ago

    @Sherlock Watson

    Hmmm. That suggests the need for a Wile E. Coyote-like cliff in the last panel.

  9. amaki80

    amaki80 said, over 1 year ago

    I agree with Saskfan and SherlockWatson. %D

  10. Rad-ish

    Rad-ish GoComics PRO Member said, over 1 year ago

    Time to clean up the mess, oh…

  11. InTraining

    InTraining said, over 1 year ago

    @Sherlock Watson

    Funny….. I am smiling… ! ! ! (and drinking decaf !)

  12. bmonk

    bmonk said, over 1 year ago

    Or: Andante, Presto, Furioso e Rubato

  13. Glass Hole

    Glass Hole GoComics PRO Member said, over 1 year ago

    Feelin’ down.?

  14. Nabuquduriuzhur

    Nabuquduriuzhur said, over 1 year ago

    re: apikoros

    what does illiteracy have to do with a type of coffee originating in Italy? When words are borrowed from other nations, they are sometimes transliterated word for word, or a different name is chosen. Corn means any grain in the UK, but it’s specific to Zea mays in the U.S. Maize never caught on, which is probably just as well as every tribe that grew it had their own name for it.
    .
    In the case of other alphabets like Cyrillic, it can be even more problematic. With some nations, official names change quite a bit, such as going from Peking to Bay-Jing to Bay-Zhing or from Tsaritsyn to Stalingrad to Volgograd or from Batavia to Jakarta, or from Bombay to Mumbai. Sometimes when a politico fell out of favor, the name changed, such as Deng Xioping to Dung Zioping after Tienamen Square.
    .
    Espresso or Expresso both work. The latter is actually more accurate in defining how the coffee is made, since pressure is used, i.e., the verb “expressed” for squeezed out under pressure.

  15. Scyphi

    Scyphi said, over 1 year ago

    @Nabuquduriuzhur

    Ditto all that, and to continue, keep in mind just how much of a mish-mash of foreign words the English language is. It borrows heavily on words from other languages, and tries to fit it into its own language, and often times the transition is not smooth. It is not at all surprising that the pronunciation is “englishified” (for lack of a better way to put it).

    Either way, both work, and more importantly, both work for the gag of this comic. That there is good enough for me.

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