Advertisement
Advertisement

Tony Auth for November 01, 2013

7 Comments

Hide All Comments
  1. Missing large
    Don Winchester GC Insider almost 5 years ago

    Something must be done about the FRAUD within the food stamp program, not end it for those that TRULY need it! There is so much fraud within it’s system that so much more could be cut and there’d still be plenty for the ones that benefit from it.

     •  Reply
  2. Missing large
    Doughfoot  almost 5 years ago

    GOP: “Better to let ten deserving people suffer, than permit one freeloading moocher to get away with it.” But the Republican governor of Ohio says that his party is waging a war on the poor. Well, he will be purged.

     •  Reply
  3. Missing large
    Doughfoot  almost 5 years ago

    No reason to be against it. There has always been voter ID. I’ve never gone to the polls and not had to identify myself. The question is entirely about how it is done, and the effect the method has and the manner of carrying it into effect. Just about all the schemes that have been put into effect disproportionately effect certain segments of the population, and they are always segments that tend to vote Democratic. If it looks like voter suppression, walks like voters suppression, and quacks like voter suppression, it probably IS voter suppression. Eliminating, curtailing, or blocking early voting, not providing enough polling stations, or poll workers to prevent long lines and long waits is another method. Voting is supposed to be one of our most important rights as citizens, and every effort ought to be made to ensure we can vote, rather than placing hurdles in our way. If we really wanted everyone to do their duty and vote, we would regard failure to vote in the same light as shirking jury duty, tax evasion, and draft dodging. Here, in the 18th century, and even today in Australia and other places, failure to vote is punishable by a fine. Election days are holidays in some places. And if you can identify yourself well enough to buy things online, there is nothing to prevent moving toward online voting: unless it is the profound distrust Americans seem to have for one another. But if we must have a new regimen of ID for voting, I would at least like to see it be consistent, national, and equally burdensome to all. A specifically issued voter ID card, say, that EVERY voter must have when he or she goes to vote. Perhaps even a national ID card that would be needed to get a job, buy a gun, vote, get a license, marry, obtain government benefits, etc. And a good system to make sure that every person can get one. Phased in over a course of years, perhaps, and not required for voting until there have been several years of establishing the system. Otherwise, it seem to me to be so much subterfuge. Look at the history of voter suppression in the past, and the reasonable-sounding methods used. One of our greatest (IMHO) founding fathers, George Mason, maintained that any man who is to be governed by a set of laws has a natural right to a voice in the making of those laws. ( Of course, that was before we invented the crime of illegal immigration. There was only immigration. No one was forbidden to come. In fact, the Declaration of Independence specifically condemns the king for discouraging immigration to the colonies, and putting barriers in the way of naturalization. One doesn’t hear much about that these days. )

     •  Reply
  4. Bcb9e9d7d78ab1710ebd05f21f05f061
    lectricdude  almost 5 years ago

    …whether one is rewarded for reporting fraud or not is irrelevant…a good citizen does the right thing…because it is the right thing…whether anything is done about it is also not the issue…reporting the fraud is the good citizen’s responsibility…then it is the job of the appropriate authority to follow up or not…but the citizen has done his duty…which benefits himself and all law abiding people…that is reward enough in itself…any additional reward “icing on the cake”…’

     •  Reply
Sign in to comment
Advertisement
Advertisement