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Stuart Carlson for July 23, 2009

  1. Woodstock
    HUMPHRIES  over 12 years ago

    Understatement !?

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    Michigander  over 12 years ago

    You’ve got that right, Mr. Taxpayer!

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    hank197857  over 12 years ago

    why not test market national healthcare? start with loma linda, ca. if it works there …

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    cdward  over 12 years ago

    Test market it in NY!

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    hastynote Premium Member over 12 years ago

    Hey!!! It looks like Nomad didn’t paste his post here either!!! National health care HAS been test marketed already. My health care costs slid below the radar when I turned 65, and became a Medicare participant. If only we could go to France, U.K. and Canada to experience the true quality of health care that has a superior longevity; much lower infant mortality; and no one going bankrupt [including businesses] because of the cost of our too expensive private health care model. With all of the advantages of global trade and travel, it is amazing how the U.S. private health care system has kept Americans in the dark about the advantages of universal health care!!

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  6. Lorax
    iamthelorax  over 12 years ago

    BOB HASTY,

    I don’t think you actually want a carbon-copy of Canada’s system, I don’t think people truly understand what we go through sometimes.

    There are advantages to having universal care, but don’t let them blind you into thinking it is problem free.

    Do you have a family doctor? Because they don’t exist here.

    If you need to see a doctor, do you have to show up by 9:00 or else the line up will have reserved all of the spots for the day? Because that happens here a lot.

    If you need an MRI, are you told to wait minimum 5 months? It’s a classic here.

    As for our lower infant mortality, it just so happens that there is a waiting list of about 1 year to see a pediatrician. That’s right, you need to ask for a spot before you even get pregnant if you want the pediatrician to see your baby while he or she is still newborn.

    I totally get the need to change your medical system, but it looks like Obama just wants to copy/paste our system onto your country and it’s not the right way.

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    ezdeb  over 12 years ago

    People, Iamthelorax is completely clueless. He/she speaks as a Canadian, but it’s my opinion that he is just trotting out aimless and easily debunked talking points. The statements are generalized and not personal; just blabbing about “You don’t REALLY want this, do you?” Like his 6th point about newborn infant care. This is just dumb, and I call BS. IATL, would you please tell us how you came to that absurd infant care information?

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    ezdeb  over 12 years ago

    Oh, I forgot the last paragraph IATL puts out. Anyone who looked at the bill that came out of the U.S. House agrees that it most definitely is NOT a European or Canadian model. When you say that “it looks like…cut/paste “our” system…”, did you look? I didn’t think so. Somebody said Boo, and you are happy to run around, shouting about ghosts.

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    ezdeb  over 12 years ago

    Congrats, Grampa!!

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    Redeemd  over 12 years ago

    Universal health care has been tested in the US. The state of Massachusetts has had it since 2006. Net effect: They have the highest tax rate in the country (nicknamed Taxachusetts), they are running a large deficit and many of their hospitals are teetering on bankruptcy.

    But don’t take my word for it:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massachusettshealthcare_reform

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  11. Lorax
    iamthelorax  over 12 years ago

    DrCanuck, you obviously don’t live in Quebec. There are no family doctors, only emergency clinics. Ther is no such thing as “call and get an appointment”, you show up and get told if you can see the doctor and if not, come back tomorrow.

    I have 2 kids, both of them have not seen a pediatrician because the waiting list was too long on the South Shore, they had to go the Montreal Children’s Hospital for checkups.

    It also happens that my wife had to wait 2 months to see a specialist to tell her that her aching back was a tumor on her spine.

    And don’t act like it’s just Quebec because I lived in Nova Scotia for 2 years and it was the same thing, emergency clinic only. And radiation treatment for tumors has a huge lineup in the Maritimes. Get ready for it to get worst with bone scans, Harper closed Chalk river so we’ll be low on isotopes soon, that comes from my wife’s Oncologist.

    You are in an area where things are better, very glad for you but “universal care” has a different experience everywhere, don’t call what I’m telling you nonsense.

    There are some good things about medicare. For example,I don’t have to worry about the cost of Herceptin, which is good because she’ll be on it for years. But if access to doctors was better, we could have caught her illness before it went to stage 4. Things need to change!

    Which area are you from?

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    ezdeb  over 12 years ago

    Boy, lorax, you just can’t accept that someone might be happy in Canada. Leave the guy alone. He doesn’t have to tell you where he lives.

    Hey, grampa, my kids seem content to have cats. It’s not as fun to snuggle a cat’s neck, but then a lot depends on the cat.

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    cdward  over 12 years ago

    Was listening to a call in radio show today about health care reform, and because we’re not far from Canada, there were several Canadian callers. All said they’d prefer their own system over ours. However, those from Quebec Province did say theirs not as good as in other provinces. I don’t know enough about them to say. Still, even the Quebecers preferred their system to ours.

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    ezdeb  over 12 years ago

    OK, Dr. You were the one who dropped the G-bomb. I think it’s a great thing to be, um, the father of the parent of a baby. What do you want to be called? You better figure it out, cuz that baby will be talking before you know it!

    I have friends who have grandchildren; they insist on being called mom-mom and pop-pop. I personally LIKE grampa. If multiple grampas, then Grampa Ralph, Grampa Jack, etc. Just don’t make the kid feel bad if he/she/they call you grampa and stubbornly refuse to call you Senator Dad or whatever you pick. This is why my mother is still BonnLee. She should have been Gramma Bonnie, but some grandchild couldn’t pronounce it, it stuck, and that’s it.

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    Motivemagus  over 12 years ago

    Redeemd - the “Taxachusetts” label has been around for a while, when the Republicans decided to demonize the home of American independence because a certain Democratic governor ran for president. And you’re wrong. Massachusetts does not have the “highest tax rate in the country.” Not even close. I’ve seen tables with it ranging from 10-15.

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  16. Willow
    nomad2112  over 12 years ago

    BOB HASTY - here ya go … http://www.hawaiireporter.com/story.aspx?15ba16ea-e2fa-49e2-bfb0-03a852e4c86c

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  17. Lorax
    iamthelorax  over 12 years ago

    I actually can’t wait to be a Grandpa. My Grandfather was a mischievous man, always telling jokes, taking me out to do stupid stuff kids like to do like go to the river and see how far you can throw rocks into it. I fully intend on being that kind of Grandpa…..but then again I might feel different when someone calls me that. LOL!

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    jag72  over 12 years ago

    Anyone know why American Companies with offices in Canada provide private insurance for their Canadian workers? To get around the inadequacies of their system. Should this country ever be dumb enough to instigate national health, I want to hear your comments once it starts.

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  19. Stitch
    dshepard  over 12 years ago

    If it passes, it will break you too…just in another way. Kinda screwed, aren’t you.

    It still amazes me that people are naieve enough to rely on an institution that has a solid track record for breaking things by mismanagement and cronyism to fix our healthcare. They fully intend to throw our current healthcare system completely out the window to replace it with one of their own making. If they succeed we will wish we had this one back.

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    ezdeb  over 12 years ago

    David, what about the VA, medicare, medicaid, school lunches, community colleges, public television, etc etc?

    Come on, now. There are lots of good government programs. And government works in partnership with lots of other organizations to do good things, too! You are convinced that America is on it’s last legs and just can’t take anything other than your ideas for it!

    As if cronyism and mismanagement haven’t dogged private enterprise!

    Why don’t you come up with some ideas?

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  21. Phil b r
    pbarnrob  over 12 years ago

    Just heard a story (from our traveling teacher/storyteller friend from Tinian) about Chinese medicine, back to about 3000-4000BC; the village doctor got paid as long as you were well. It was a tiny stipend, from everybody in the village. When you got sick, your payment stopped until you were well again.

    Does that strike you as an incentive?

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    Gladius  over 12 years ago

    Not unless they can control our eating habits and lifestyle in general. I’d say that w/out that control you wouldn’t have any doctors to treat you. Also, what would you call tiny? How would you define sick? Would a cold count? If you’re terminally ill I have NO incentive for treating you. There are so many problems with adapting an early society practice to a complex modern society that the idea becomes more and more unattractive as you just begin to actually look at it.

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    CorosiveFrog Premium Member over 12 years ago

    Once small sentence from we Know Who; “I hope he fails”.

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    4uk4ata  over 12 years ago

    Three cheers for schadenfreude…

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    mhenriday  over 12 years ago

    The United States devotes more of its GDP to what is called medical care (that includes, of course, the insurance company rake-offs and the hordes of lawyers who make quite respectable livings by litigating on both sides of the fence) than any comparable country, while enjoying lower life expectancy and higher neo-natal death rates than its peers. Those who profit from the system take this to mean that nothing needs to be changed - and especially not in the direction taken by those dastardly European countries ! In criminal investigations, there are two watch words ; one is «cherchez la femme», the other «follow the money»….

    Henri

    PS : For those who prefere Latin, Vespasianus’ «[pecuniam] non olet» is pretty apt as well…

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    meowdam  over 12 years ago

    Single payer system , the only answer.

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    4uk4ata  over 12 years ago

    @Tjanus - three cheers for copy-pasting too!

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    treered  over 12 years ago

    sounds like cutting off your nose to spite your face

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  29. Stitch
    dshepard  over 12 years ago

    The first real solution for healthcare is tort reform. Limit the awards on the lawsuits that are causing malpractice insurance rates to skyrocket and doctors to perform unnecessary tests and procedures for the sole purpose of covering their backsides.

    The second real solution for healthcare reform is lobbying reform. Drug company, hospital, health insurance, and even the AMA lobbyists through our congressmen enable these companies to continue to gouge patients through practices unsavory at best. Our Congressmen have the power to stop the lobbyists easily. All they need do is refuse their offer…to put the best interest of Americans above their own personal gain. If your congressman or woman isn’t capable of this, fire them and replace them with someone who is capable of this.

    Right now, all Obamacare will do is transfer the skyrocketing cost of healthcare to the taxpayer and instead of cutting costs by cutting off the fat cats, they will instead cut benefits to Americans in order to continue to pay off their fat cats that helped them gain the money and power that they have now.

    The government CANNOT fix the problem it is continuously causing and making worse. It defies common sense!

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    yayliberalism  over 12 years ago

    they would find ways around it

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    Copperdomebodhi  over 12 years ago

    David -

    They’ve had tort reform in California and Texas for years. Nothing’s changed. Texas is the location of the town where Medicaid expenses are the highest in the nation.

    If you want to cut the skyrocketing cost of healthcare, reducing the profit motive will do that. Lobbying reform should be a piece of that, but it won’t be enough by itself.

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  32. Stitch
    dshepard  over 12 years ago

    Tort reforms in two states is sorely inadequate and without lobbist reform it is even more so. To cut the costs it needs to be done on a national level.

    Also, have you scrutinized WHY the Medicaid expenses are high or are you making assumptions?

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