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Steve Benson for November 08, 2016

  1. Aaarrrrggghhhhh
    tom_wright  about 5 years ago

    The system’s rigged.

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    Zen-of-Zinfandel  about 5 years ago

    “I’m from the government and I’m here to help.” Reagan said those were the most terrifying words he’d heard.

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  3. What is future boy conan
    Teto85 Premium Member about 5 years ago

    I voted about 3 weeks ago. I’m working the election. EVERYONE GET OUT AND VOTE!!!!!! OR HELP OTHERS TO THE POLLS!!!

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  4. Crow
    Happy Two Shoes  about 5 years ago

    Reagan said the government doesn’t work

    repulicons have been proving that ever since.

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  5. Gatti bellissimi sacro di birmania birmano leggenda
    montessoriteacher  about 5 years ago

    It is finally election day! I only hope that there are enough Democrats around so that things will not be so stymied as they were in the past. That will probably be the issue once again otherwise.

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    Albert Sims Premium Member about 5 years ago

    My excuse for not voting today is that I don’t want to get arrested for trying to vote twice. I early voted on October 25th. :-)

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    David Huie Green-ToChargeForTruthIsToPayForLies  about 5 years ago

    It IS rigged! They only let me vote ONCE!

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    stevebenson  about 5 years ago

    Yet more for Zin: . ..

    “* Excluding citizens from Government: Information is the currency of democracy, but Mr. Reagan wants to shut citizens out by weakening the Freedom of Information Act. He has erected procedural and economic barriers to keep citizens from challenging Government decisions, and has sought, unsuccessfully, to abolish the legal services program for the poor, but has watered it down. Incredibly, he sanctions secrecy by reclassification of public documents with an executive order that also permits the Government to classify information without having to show that disclosure will cause identifiable harm.

    “* Pre-emption of state law: Remember when President Reagan preached states’ rights? Now, when corporations want Federal pre-emption, he snaps to attention. He favors Federal pre-emption of state laws on transportation of nuclear waste, on workers’ rights to know about chemical hazards in the workplace, on safeguards on adjustable-rate mortages. Worst of all is his proposal to pre- empt all common and state law defining manufacturers’ liability for injurious products.” . . .

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    stevebenson  about 5 years ago

    Still more for Zin: . . .

    “* Stilling public voices: The Reagan Federal Communications Commission wants to eliminate the fairness doctrine, which permits people to talk back to television and radio programs transmitted over the public airwaves. He has backed F.C.C. moves to raise residential-telephone rates. He has cut aid to libraries and condoned larger postal rate increases for nonprofit organizations. His ‘controlled access’ press conferences further isolate him from public accountability. None of these manifestations of Big Government keep President Reagan from campaigning against his own performance. ’We’ve said it before and let’s say it again,’ he regularly intones. ‘Government is too big and it spends too much money.’ But the Reagan Government has set its own bigness record. As he boasted last month, speaking of a desired second term, ‘’You ain’t seen nothing yet.’” . . . -— . . .

    Please do your homework, Zin; otherwise, it will be handed to you, along with your proverbial head, on a platter.

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    stevebenson  about 5 years ago

    More for Zin from Reagan’s conservative critics: . . .Let’s look at the record:

    Spending

    In 1980, Jimmy Caner’s last year as president, the federal government spent a whopping 27.9% of “national income” (an obnoxious term for the private wealth produced by the American people). Reagan assaulted the free-spending Carter administration throughout his campaign in 1980. So how did the Reagan administration do? At the end of the first quarter of 1988, federal spending accounted for 28.7% of “national income.”

    Even Ford and Carter did a better job at cutting government. Their combined presidential terms account for an increase of 1.4%—compared with Reagan’s 3%—in the government’s take of “national income.” And in nominal terms, there has been a 60% increase in government spending, thanks mainly to Reagan’s requested budgets, which were only marginally smaller than the spending Congress voted." . . .

    (continued below)

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    stevebenson  about 5 years ago

    More for Zin from conservative bashersm of Reagan: . . .

    “The budget for the Department of Education, which candidate Reagan promised to abolish along with the Department of Energy, has [under Reagan] more than doubled to $22.7 billion, Social Security spending has risen from $179 billion in 1981 to $269 billion in 1986. The price of farm programs went from $21.4 billion in 1981 to $51.4 billion in 1987, a 140% increase. And this doesn’t count the recently signed $4 billion “drought-relief” measure. Medicare spending in 1981 was $43.5 billion; in 1987 it hit $80 billion. Federal entitlements cost $197.1 billion in 1981—and $477 billion in 1987. . . .

    “Foreign aid has also risen, from $10 billion to $22 billion. Every year, Reagan asked for more foreign-aid money than the Congress was willing to spend. He also pushed through Congress an $8.4 billion increase in the U.S. “contribution” to the International Monetary Fund. . . .

    “His budget cuts were actually cuts in projected spending, not absolute cuts in current spending levels. As Reagan put it, ’We’re not attempting to cut either spending or taxing levels below that which we presently have.’ . . .

    (continued below)

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    stevebenson  about 5 years ago

    Poor Zin didn’t know what he was getting into. Continued from “Free Market”: . . .

    “The result has been unprecedented government debt. Reagan has tripled the Gross Federal Debt, from $900 billion to $2.7 trillion. Ford and Carter in their combined terms could only double it. It took 31 years to accomplish the first postwar debt tripling, yet Reagan did it in eight. . . .“Taxes . . .

    “Before looking at taxation under Reagan, we must note that spending is the better indicator of the size of the government. If government cuts taxes, but not spending, it still gets the money from somewhere—either by borrowing or inflating. Either method robs the productive sector. Although spending is the better indicator, it is not complete, because it ignores other ways in which the government deprives producers of wealth. For instance, it conceals regulation and trade restricdons, which may require little government outlay. . . .

    “If we look at government revenues as a percentage of ‘national income,’ we find little change from the Carter days, despite heralded ‘tax cuts.’ In 1980, revenues were 25.1% of ‘national income.’ In the first quarter of 1988 they were 24.7%.

    “Reagan came into office proposing to cut personal income and business taxes. The Economic Recovery Act was supposed to reduce revenues by $749 billion over five years. But this was quickly reversed with the Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act of 1982. TEFRA—the largest tax increase in American history—was designed to raise $214.1 billion over five years, and took back many of the business tax savings enacted the year before. It also imposed withholding on interest and dividends, a provision later repealed over the president’s objection.” . . .

    (continued below)

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    stevebenson  about 5 years ago

    More for Zin the Pinned: . . .

    “But this was just the beginning. In 1982 Reagan supported a five-cent-per-gallon gasoline tax and higher taxes on the trucking industry. Total increase: $5.5 billion a year. In 1983, on the recommendation of his Spcial Security Commission— chaired by the man he later made Fed chairman, Alan Green-span—Reagan called for, and received, Social Security tax increases of $165 billion over seven years. A year later came Reagan’s Deficit Reduction Act to raise $50 billion.

    “Even the heralded Tax Reform Act of 1986 is more deception than substance. It shifted $120 billion over five years from visible personal income taxes to hidden business taxes. It lowered the rates, but it also repealed or reduced many deductions.

    “According to the Treasury Department, the 1981 tax cut will have reduced revenues by $1.48 trillion by the end of fiscal 1989. But tax increases since 1982 will equal $1.5 trillion by 1989. The increases include not only the formal legislation mentioned above but also bracket creep (which ended in 1985 when tax indexing took effect—a provision of the 1981 act despite Reagan’s objection), $30 billion in various tax changes, and other increases. Taxes by the end of the Reagan era will be as large a chunk of GNP as when he took office, if not larger: 19.4%, by ultra-conservative estimate of the Reagan Office of Management and Budget. The so-called historic average is 18.3%.” . . .

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    stevebenson  about 5 years ago

    More wake-up for Zin:

    “Regulation

    “For all the administration’s talk about deregulation (for example, from the know-nothing commission which George Bush headed), it has done little. Much of what has been done began under Carter, such as abolition of the Civil Aeronautics Board and deregulation of oil prices. Carter created the momentum and Reagan halted it. In fact, the economic costs of regulation have grown under Reagan.

    “Some deregulation has occurred for banks, intercity buses, ocean shipping, and energy. But nothing good has happened in health, safety, and environmental regulations, which cost Americans billions of dollars, ignore property rights, and are based on the spurious notion of “freedom from risk.” But the Reagan administration has supported state seat-belt and federal air-bag requirements. This concern for safety, however, was never extended to the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) rules, which, by imposing fuel-efficiency standards, promote the production of small cars. The shift to small cars will cause an estimated 10,000 to 20,000 highway deaths over the next ten years." . . .

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    stevebenson  about 5 years ago

    Zipping it up for Zin: . . .

    “Bureaucracy . . .

    “By now it should not be surprising that the size of the bureaucracy has also grown. Today, there are 230,000 more civilian government workers than in 1980, bringing the total to almost three million. Reagan even promoted the creation of a new federal Department of Veterans’ Affairs to join the Departments of Education and Energy, which his administration was supposed to eliminate. . . .

    “Trade . . .

    “The Reagan administration has been the most protectionist since Herbert Hoover’s. The portion of imports under restriction has doubled since 1980. Quotas and so-called voluntary restraints have been imposed on a host of products, from computer chips to automobiles. Ominously, Reagan has adopted the bogus fair-trade/free-trade dichotomy, and he was eager to sign the big trade bill, which tilts the trade laws even further toward protectionism. . . .

    “Results . . .

    “Reagan’s fans argue that he has changed the terms of public-policy debate, that no one today dares propose big spending programs. I contend that the alleged spending-shyness of politicians is not the result of an ideological sea-change, but rather of their constituents’ fiscal fright brought about by $250 billion Reagan budget deficits. If the deficit ever shrinks, the demand for spending will resume.

    “This is the Reagan legacy. He was to be the man who would turn things around. But he didn’t even try. As he so dramatically illustrated when he accepted the plant-closing bill, there has been no sea-change in thinking about the role of government.” . . ._____ . . .

    Ask for it, Zin, and ye shall receive. :)

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    stevebenson  about 5 years ago

    Now, where were we? Oh, yes, voting on election day. Come on, boys and girls, do your civic duty. :)

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  17. Bill
    Mr. Blawt  about 5 years ago

    No excuses for not voting. It might be the only time we have a little control over what our government is doing to us. If you don’t like the choices, don’t wait 4 years and then complain because you aren’t seeing what you like. Go get involved, run for office yourself, vote and canvass neighborhoods. Heck, you could even be a cartoonist! And like Benson said – “Do your civic duty” get out and vote!

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  18. Lifi
    rossevrymn Premium Member about 5 years ago

    The Dems rigged their system, and, ironically, it cost them the election.

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