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Hank Gillette Premium

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  1. about 1 month ago on Pluggers

    What about all that ear hair?

  2. about 1 month ago on Ripley's Believe It or Not

    I think it is a pocket watch on a chain.

  3. about 1 month ago on Ripley's Believe It or Not

    The product that Pemberton’s French Wine Coca was trying to emulate, Vin Mariani, was extremely popular. The creator of the tonic, chemist Angelo Mariani, had read a scientific paper that revealed that when alcohol and coca were combined, the human body created a potent chemical compound, cocaethylene, which was more potent that either consuming alcohol or coca alone.

    Among the many famous people who enjoyed Vin Mariani were: actress Sarah Bernhardt, Thomas Edison, Pope Leo XIII, former President U.S. Grant (who used it while writing his memoirs while he was dying of esophageal cancer), President McKinley, the Empress of Russia, and Jules Verne. Many of these people endorsed Vin Mariani in advertisements, and the Pope awarded the creator of the beverage a gold medal.

    It must have been pretty potent stuff. One ad, perhaps using a bit of hyperbole claimed: “The Mummies themselves get up and walk when they have a drink of Vin Mariani.”

  4. about 1 month ago on Ripley's Believe It or Not

    I really wonder what the flavor of cocaine-free coca leaf extract is? I doubt it contributes much to the taste of Coke, but it allows them to claim that they are sticking to the original recipe. I don’t think the coca leaves were in there originally for their flavor.

  5. about 1 month ago on Ripley's Believe It or Not

    It could be the replacement of sugar with high-fructose corn syrup, or it could have just been age. A lot of things don’t taste as good to me as they did when I was young, including Coca-Cola, but I think that is because when I was a kid, a Coke was a rare treat, and now I can have one anytime I want.

  6. about 1 month ago on Ripley's Believe It or Not

    Actually, the drink was not named Coca-Cola until 1886, after the alcohol was removed. Before that, it was called Pemberton’s French Wine Coca. It did continue to contain small amounts of cocaine until 1903.

  7. about 1 month ago on Ripley's Believe It or Not

    A bad ruling from the judge. He should have been more precise and said that a sandwich has to have bread on the top and on the bottom. This would have included hot dogs, hamburgers, pocket bread sandwiches, and all submarine type sandwiches where a single piece of bread is cut open, but not necessarily into two pieces.

    This would have left out open-faced sandwiches, but if you can’t pick it up in your hands to eat it (at least initially), it’s not really a sandwich.

  8. about 1 month ago on Ripley's Believe It or Not

    Hamburger and hot dog buns originally came unsliced, and the consumer had to cut it open.

  9. about 1 month ago on Ripley's Believe It or Not

    Hamburgers were originally called “hamburger sandwiches”. Like many other things, the name got shortened.

  10. about 1 month ago on Nancy

    Perhaps the coloring of the strip is trying to invoke the feeling of finding an old Bushmiller strip in a tattered, yellowing newspaper.