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Comics I Follow

Doonesbury

Doonesbury

By Garry Trudeau
Phil Hands

Phil Hands

Clay Jones

Clay Jones

Views of the World

Views of the World

By CartoonArts International
Two Party Opera

Two Party Opera

By Brian Carroll
Truth Facts

Truth Facts

By Wulff & Morgenthaler
Rabbits Against Magic

Rabbits Against Magic

By Jonathan Lemon
Not Invented Here

Not Invented Here

By Bill Barnes and friends
MythTickle

MythTickle

By Justin Thompson
Mr. Lowe

Mr. Lowe

By Mark Pett
Miss Peach

Miss Peach

By Mell Lazarus
Liz Climo Cartoons

Liz Climo Cartoons

By Liz Climo
Joe Heller

Joe Heller

Gray Matters

Gray Matters

By Stuart Carlson and Jerry Resler
Cathy Commiserations

Cathy Commiserations

By Cathy Guisewite
Candorville

Candorville

By Darrin Bell
Tank McNamara

Tank McNamara

By Bill Hinds
Dick Tracy

Dick Tracy

By Mike Curtis and Shelley Pleger
Dilbert Classics

Dilbert Classics

By Scott Adams
Alley Oop

Alley Oop

By Jonathan Lemon and Joey Alison Sayers
Betty

Betty

By Gary Delainey and Gerry Rasmussen
Cathy Classics

Cathy Classics

By Cathy Guisewite
FoxTrot Classics

FoxTrot Classics

By Bill Amend
FoxTrot

FoxTrot

By Bill Amend
The Knight Life

The Knight Life

By Keith Knight
The K Chronicles

The K Chronicles

By Keith Knight
Luann Againn

Luann Againn

By Greg Evans
Luann

Luann

By Greg Evans
Monty

Monty

By Jim Meddick
Non Sequitur

Non Sequitur

By Wiley Miller
Overboard

Overboard

By Chip Dunham
9 Chickweed Lane Classics

9 Chickweed Lane Classics

By Brooke McEldowney
9 Chickweed Lane

9 Chickweed Lane

By Brooke McEldowney
Pibgorn

Pibgorn

By Brooke McEldowney
Shoe

Shoe

By Gary Brookins and Susie MacNelly
Speed Bump

Speed Bump

By Dave Coverly
That is Priceless

That is Priceless

By Steve Melcher
Tom the Dancing Bug

Tom the Dancing Bug

By Ruben Bolling
Clay Bennett

Clay Bennett

Steve Benson

Steve Benson

Chris Britt

Chris Britt

Stuart Carlson

Stuart Carlson

Jeff Danziger

Jeff Danziger

John Deering

John Deering

Mike Luckovich

Mike Luckovich

Gary Markstein

Gary Markstein

Jack Ohman

Jack Ohman

Pat Oliphant

Pat Oliphant

Ted Rall

Ted Rall

Drew Sheneman

Drew Sheneman

Tom Toles

Tom Toles

Signe Wilkinson

Signe Wilkinson

Matt Wuerker

Matt Wuerker

Nick Anderson

Nick Anderson

Annie

Annie

By Jay Maeder and Alan Kupperberg
Bloom County

Bloom County

By Berkeley Breathed
Endtown

Endtown

By Aaron Neathery
Jane's World

Jane's World

By Paige Braddock
Kliban

Kliban

By B. Kliban
Kliban's Cats

Kliban's Cats

By B. Kliban
Lalo Alcaraz

Lalo Alcaraz

Matt Davies

Matt Davies

Jim Morin

Jim Morin

Rob Rogers

Rob Rogers

(th)ink

(th)ink

By Keith Knight
Hutch Owen

Hutch Owen

By Tom Hart
Little Nemo

Little Nemo

By Winsor McCay
Compu-toon

Compu-toon

By Charles Boyce
Cul de Sac

Cul de Sac

By Richard Thompson
PC and Pixel

PC and Pixel

By Tak Bui
Bloom County 2019

Bloom County 2019

By Berkeley Breathed
Phoebe and Her Unicorn

Phoebe and Her Unicorn

By Dana Simpson
Lay Lines

Lay Lines

By Carol Lay

Recent Comments

  1. about 8 hours ago on PC and Pixel

    My hearing aids have little tubes and “domes” that do get ear wax in them, and it’s remarkable how little a wax blob will block all sound. My hearing-aid provider showed me that unscrewing the tubes from the (behind-the-ear) hearing aids, and running some fishing-leader line through the tubes and the dome holes, restores the sound.

    Like my eyes—and for that matter the rest of my body—my ears are gradually deteriorating, and I don’t suppose that it will be too long before I have to take some more direct action, like the character in this cartoon and Admiral Benson in Hot Shots… ( https://tenor.com/view/hot-shots-cleaning-ears-gif-15358350 )

  2. about 8 hours ago on Matt Davies

    “The Supreme Court follows the election returns” —Mr. Dooley

    Well,…

    In some ways, the history of civil rights in the US has been the overthrow by the federal government of the (presumptive) democratic will of state governments—by constitutional amendment (e.g., slavery, female suffrage), legislation (e.g., the Civil Rights Act), or court decision (e.g., Brown v. Board of Education). In most of these cases, “what is right” was made to take precedence over “public opinion” in the affected states (and FWIW I approve of those actions).

    The idea that policies ought to be determined by some majority of a small number of ideologues trying to imagine what the authors of some several-centuries-old document might have meant is pretty ridiculous to me. On the other hand, I do believe that there are certain rights and principles and policies that transcend “public opinion.”

    Part of the problem is American “democracy” itself, with its malapportionment, two-party system, gerrymandering, filibustering, and other faults, made much worse by the polarization that seems pretty much to be the intent of one of the parties. Who can doubt that the human rights actions above would fail if proposed by the Democrats and put to a vote in the current Senate?

    I’m not an American citizen, but these contradictions apply to all democracies. I have no solutions besides trying to fight for sanity in the electorate and their representatives, a Sisyphean task. Unfortunately, things seem to be going the other way, all around the world.

  3. about 9 hours ago on Jack Ohman

    " I can remember the last time prices went up this way there were a few economists saying the price of fuel should be high in order to encourage people to buy more efficient cars."

    As a sometime economist, I was saying that then in the 1970s (worrying about 15-gal minimum purchase in some of the states I was driving through and the 5-gal tank in my Austin Mini), and I’m saying it now. Carbon taxes are the most efficient, and the least market-intrusive way to conserve fossil fuels and thereby cut carbon emissions. (I would take a portion of the revenues to subsidize public transportation—because I won’t pretend that the taxes won’t make it more difficult to drive around—and the rest to be distributed to people on a per-capita basis, because the idea is to make carbon relatively more expensive. But I digress.) When gas is more expensive, people have all sorts of ways to deal with this, from commuting less (moving closer to work or working closer to home), to acquiring more efficient vehicles, to carpooling, to just keeping their tires properly inflated.

    British Columbia instituted a carbon tax in 2008, and it was quite successful in cutting gasoline sales and reducing carbon emissions.

    It became obvious in the 1970s that fossil fuel had a tenuous supply and was always to be in danger of becoming scarce. Nevertheless, people (primarily Americans, who lived in a country with cheap gas) kept on buying comparatively fuel-inefficient vehicles. They are now paying the price for not paying attention…

  4. about 10 hours ago on Doonesbury

    https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Quotes/TwoPlusTortureMakesFive

  5. about 17 hours ago on Bloom County

    “…but what’s with the 200 lb duck, regardless of what colors?”

    “Le coeur a ses raisons que la raison ne connaît pas” — Blaise Pascal

  6. 1 day ago on Clay Jones

    This morning I was following comments on a dumb column in The Washington Post; there was only one troll, and he/she/it was more deranged and less literate than the half dozen or so we have here. Hey trolls! There are unexplored opportunities at the WaPo—why don’t you leave here and try hitting the big time? Perhaps you can talk it over in your cubicles as the Internet Research Agency…

  7. 3 days ago on Clay Jones

    Looking back, I think you`re right. I suppose that the links couldn’t have hurt, though, for those unfamiliar with His Noodly Holiness.

  8. 3 days ago on Lalo Alcaraz

    Cassidy Hutchinson’s testimony about Trump’s insisting that weapons be allowed into his rally, saying “They’re not here to hurt me,” reminded me of the punch line in a favourite movie:

    * * * * * Spoiler for the excellent and haunting 1974 movie The Conversation * * * * *

    Surveillance expert Harry Caul (Gene Hackman) has been hired by a mysterious employer to record a conversation between a man and a woman in Union Square, San Francisco. With several microphones around the Square, he spends much of the movie mixing and refining the tape of the (titular) conversation. As he works on the recording, we hear one of them saying, “He’d kill us if he knew” several times. Having once been involved in a surveillance that resulted in some murders, Harry guesses that the conversation is between an adulterous wife and her lover, and that his employer, on hearing the evidence, might have the couple killed. He stalls handing over the tape, but it’s eventually taken from him by his employer’s agent. He then discovers that it’s his employer who is murdered, and apparently by (or with the connivance of) the couple. Fiddling and refining the tape mix, he finally hears what the couple were saying: “He’d kill us if he knew.”

  9. 3 days ago on Mike Luckovich

    I imagine that Trump imagined himself heroically striding into the Senate chamber and delivering Oliver Cromwell’s Speech to the Rump Parliament:

    “Ye are grown intolerably odious to the whole nation. You were deputed here by the people to get grievances redressed, are yourselves become the greatest grievance.

    “Your country therefore calls upon me to cleanse this Augean stable, by putting a final period to your iniquitous proceedings in this House; and which by God’s help, and the strength he has given me, I am now come to do.

    “I command ye therefore, upon the peril of your lives, to depart immediately out of this place.

    “Go, get you out! Make haste! Ye venal slaves be gone! So! Take away that shining bauble there, and lock up the doors.

    “In the name of God, go!”

    (Not realizing that Congress can dismiss him, not the other way around.)

  10. 3 days ago on Chris Britt

    Clearly a Carly Simon fan…