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jadoo823 Free

Recent Comments

  1. 3 days ago on Swan Eaters

    …it doesn’t appear to have occurred to aoffal to wonder where those gifts ARE coming from…

  2. 4 days ago on Garfield

    …’strue – just ask Mittens over at Texts from Mittens…

  3. 4 days ago on Agnes

    …looks like grandma did NOT get there in time…on the other hand, Agnes might have started a new fashion – Trout’s mom may wear it like that the next time she hits the bar to party with all of Trout’s uncles…

  4. 4 days ago on A Problem Like Jamal

    LOL

  5. 5 days ago on Breaking Cat News

    …WHO is the ginger tabby eating with Lupin and Puck?? Is that Burt?…

  6. 5 days ago on Breaking Cat News

    …“and the geese cheered!”…

  7. 5 days ago on Swan Eaters

    …advertising for Pepsodent?…

  8. 5 days ago on A Problem Like Jamal

    …so, (referencing the actual question) if I’m singing a song with the ‘N’ word in it, should I skip that part?…(not that I do, I won’t use the word at all – I think I did once in my teens or twenties, and it was in a different context, and I still wince at it 30+ years later)…Should one say “bleep” instead?…but the (much) younger generation, white, black, other colours, do listen to the rap/hip hop music that does employ that word, and they sing them as well; so, honestly and out of curiosity, what should they do??

  9. 5 days ago on Agnes

    …hopefully Grandma walks in in the nick of time…

  10. 5 days ago on Herman

    …per Mirriam Webster:…

    The Mysterious Origins of Kibosh

    Kibosh has been a part of our language for almost two centuries, but its origin baffles etymologists. It was prominent enough in lower-class London speech to attract the attention of Charles Dickens, who used it in 1836 in an early sketch, but little else is certain. Claims were once made that it was Yiddish, despite the absence of a plausible Yiddish source. Another hypothesis points to Gaelic caidhp bháis—pronounced similarly to, and meaning, “coif of death”—explained as headgear a judge put on when pronouncing a death sentence, or as a covering pulled over the face of a corpse when a coffin was closed. But evidence for any metaphorical use of this phrase in Irish is lacking, and kibosh is not recorded as spoken in Ireland until decades after Dickens’ use.