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Non Sequitur by Wiley Miller for October 05, 2014

  1. Birthcontrol
    Dtroutma  about 7 years ago

    And my efforts at finding a contractor to show up, just for an appraisal is now proven to be a slow because he hasn’t finished that job?

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  2. Scribble can
    Three Steps Over Japan  about 7 years ago

    Very sweet art, Wiley! No plans for showing the rest of the cave?The contractor was an absolute genius. The owners? Neanderthals.

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  3. Duck1275
    Brass Orchid Premium Member about 7 years ago

    Maybe you should fire them.You’re paying for everything, right?If they aren’t giving you the results for which you are providing remuneration, then you have a perfect right to complain. It is your vision that should guide the future, after all, and not some morons whose dreams are crippled by practicalities, able to see only what is possible and not what is necessary.

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    cripplious  about 7 years ago

    I really get tired of politics being dragged into every comic

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    drjinx  about 7 years ago

    Ahh ! The highest form of life on earth, humans. No wonder we need to create Gods

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  6. Avat
    Richard Howland-Bolton Premium Member about 7 years ago

    Petra?

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  7. Me 2015
    puddlesplatt  about 7 years ago

    cistern chapel, methinks!

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  8. Ankh 280
    David1960 Premium Member about 7 years ago

    Love the artwork Wiley!

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  9. Hobo
    MeGoNow Premium Member about 7 years ago
    But he promised he’d be finished before the next ice age. (Then he went on break.)
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  10. Dscn1232
    palos  about 7 years ago

    My first impression was the comic depicted the end of the original water bucket challenge.

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    Observer fo Irony  about 7 years ago

    @Clark KentWelcome to the land of the free and the brave. Be brave and be free to do what you want…as long as it does not on encroach on others.

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  12. Kernel
    Diane Lee Premium Member about 7 years ago

    The contractors only held things up 10,000 years. The rest was when the lawyers got involved.

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  13. Image001
    dogday Premium Member about 7 years ago

    Great artwork, Wiley! I loved slowly scrolling down; it really was like going back in time. Well done.

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    luvdafuneez  about 7 years ago

    Time to bring in Mike Holmes, eh?

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    dabugger  about 7 years ago

    Trying to complicate a simple situation when an earthquake interrupted a cathedral construction. Naturally abandoned and only recently discovered.

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    chuckercan  about 7 years ago

    Being an architect, the conclusion drawn is right on!

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    chuckercan  about 7 years ago

    Drawn! Get it?

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  18. Illusion
    BillJ-MN  about 7 years ago

    Once things were resolved with the contractor, the home owners’ association told them their plans violated the HOA rules.

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  19. Missing large
    jahoody  about 7 years ago

    Wiley must have studied Edward Gorey in his early years….this cave could only have come from Mr. G.

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  20. Illusion
    BillJ-MN  about 7 years ago

    I’m guessing they’re included in the broader category.

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    susan.e.a.c  about 7 years ago

    The Greeks came close to the Industrial Revolution but lacked the imagination to use what they knew and then the Romans took over. The Romans came close but didn’t see the need, slave labour worked fine and roman numerals aren’t great for math.

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    susan.e.a.c  about 7 years ago

    The Renaissance began when knowledge saved by the Christians in the Byzantine Empire made its way back to Europe. The Christians there were already ahead of Europe and saved Roman/Greek writings. Too bad violent people took down the Byzantines.

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    neeeurothrush  about 7 years ago

    i’m still thinking about that door

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  24. Siberian tigers 22
    Hunter7  about 7 years ago

    Troglodytes!

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  25. Siberian tigers 22
    Hunter7  about 7 years ago

    @Wiley – love the ‘renovations’ done on the cave.

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  26. I yam who i yam
    Kind&Kinder  about 7 years ago

    Unfortunately, religion, which should be a comfort for people in their personal lives, was co-opted long ago as a political tool I tend to shy away from politicians who tell me they’re right because “God” said it. Reminds me of Dylan’s song, “God On Our Side.” Every nation will go to war with their concept of an “almighty” or at least a philosophical imperative backing them up. It’s a kind of self-pleasuring and a Linus’ blanket. Something exists that is the substrate of our existence, but It has no interest in our politics.

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  27. Lonelemming
    Ernest Lemmingway Premium Member about 7 years ago

    Do everyone who posts to Non Sequitur a favor and stick to the editorials. In fact that goes for everyone (especially you, Night-Gaunt49 and Nabuquduriuzhur) who has to go off on tangents that have nothing to do with the strip. I wish there was an ignore option so certain members’ posts would just not show up. Hey, GoComics! Why don’t we have that option?

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  28. Jesus
    TIMH  about 7 years ago

    Ayn Rand was a staunch atheist. Yeah, and Paul Ryan did not know that until it was brought to his attention during the last Presidential election. Right.

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    DutchUncle  about 7 years ago

    See “Letter to a Phoenix” by Fredric Brown, published 1949, and many other stories. The idea of previous civilizations having grown and decayed begs the question of why we haven’t found their traces; yet our own era has bridges that are crumbling after only 50 or 60 years of use (admittedly more traffic than their design expected), and the original landmarks of many of our major cities are long erased within a century or two. The Tunguska event happened in 1908; imagine if the (presumed) asteroid impact (and resulting damage) occurred over a major modern city, or a more spread out population / civilization center, and consider how many such events might have happened without “historical record” in earlier eras, with the stories becoming discounted over time as myth or legend. Pompeii supposedly died within hours, and was lost for 1500 years, and that was in the middle of a civilized area and recorded by those who saw it from afar; in recent years we have seen how quickly and widely tsunami can spread across low-lying coastlands, suggesting that Plato’s story of Atlantis could have been a real disaster mutated into legend. We think we know about 4,000 years of history; there’s plenty of time before that for things to be forgotten.

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