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Matt Davies for May 14, 2021

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    brwydave Premium Member 2 months ago

    It’s all so true in certain parts of our country.

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    kentmarx36  2 months ago

    And a resurgence of the popularity of waving the Confederate battle flag in everyone’s face is SCARY. How long before Mitch Turtle McMafia and Kevin McCriminal hold a “vote” on replacing the Stars and Stripes with the Bars and Stars as the official flag of the new nation of American Nazis?

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    ferddo  2 months ago

    GQPs distrust schools and teachers – they think that those try to make their children into liberals… but they still want the babysitting services…

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    nyg16  2 months ago

    this is what the GQP want taught in schools

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    ferddo  2 months ago

    The South boasts that it wants to do it again, but it won’t because it knows the results would be the same…

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    Zuhlamon Premium Member 2 months ago

    Other tenets include:

    - Companies can regulate themselves, but needs subsidies of taxpayer money.

    - Jesus loves you, and shares your hatred of those people.

    - Climate Change is junk science, and creationism should be taught in schools.

    - If condoms and sex-ed are kept out of schools, teens won’t have sex.

    - A woman can’t be trusted with decisions about her own body, but anti-vaxers can.

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    briangj2  2 months ago

    In a private meeting last month with big-money donors, the head of a top conservative group boasted that her outfit had crafted the new voter suppression law in Georgia and was doing the same with similar bills for Republican state legislators across the country. “In some cases, we actually draft them for them,” she said, “or we have a sentinel on our behalf give them the model legislation so it has that grassroots, from-the-bottom-up type of vibe.”

    The Georgia law had “eight key provisions that Heritage recommended,” Jessica Anderson, the executive director of Heritage Action for America, a sister organization of the Heritage Foundation, told the foundation’s donors at an April 22 gathering in Tucson, in a recording obtained by the watchdog group Documented and shared with Mother Jones. Those included policies severely restricting mail ballot drop boxes, preventing election officials from sending absentee ballot request forms to voters, making it easier for partisan workers to monitor the polls, preventing the collection of mail ballots, and restricting the ability of counties to accept donations from nonprofit groups seeking to aid in election administration.

    All of these recommendations came straight from Heritage’s list of “best practices” drafted in February. With Heritage’s help, Anderson said, Georgia became “the example for the rest of the country.”

    Republican legislators claim they’re tightening up election procedures to address (unfounded) concerns about fraud in the 2020 election. But what’s really behind this effort is a group of conservative Washington insiders who have been pushing these same kinds of voting restrictions for decades, with the explicit aim of helping Republicans win elections. The difference now is that Trump’s baseless claims about 2020 have given them the ammunition to get the bills passed, and the conservative movement, led by Heritage, is making an unprecedented investment to get them over the finish line.

    (To be continued)

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    briangj2  2 months ago

    (Continued)

    “We’re working with these state legislators to make sure they have all of the information they need to draft the bills,” Anderson told the Heritage Foundation donors. In addition to drafting the bills in some cases, “we’ve also hired state lobbyists to make sure that in these targeted states we’re meeting with the right people.”

    To “create this echo chamber,” as Anderson put it, Heritage is spending $24 million over two years in eight battleground states—Arizona, Michigan, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Nevada, Texas, and Wisconsin—to pass and defend restrictive voting legislation. Every Tuesday, the group leads a call with right-wing advocacy groups like the Susan B. Anthony List, Tea Party Patriots, and FreedomWorks to coordinate these efforts at the highest levels of the conservative movement. “We literally give marching orders for the week ahead,” Anderson said. “All so we’re singing from the same song sheet of the goals for that week and where the state bills are across the country.”

    Days before the Georgia legislature would pass its sweeping bill rolling back access to the ballot, Anderson said she met with Gov. Brian Kemp and urged him to quickly sign the bill when it reached his desk. “I had one message for him,” said Anderson, a former Trump administration official in the Office of Management and Budget. “Do not wait to sign that bill. If you wait even an hour, you will look weak. This bill needs to be signed immediately.” Kemp followed Anderson’s advice, signing the bill right after its passage. Heritage called it a “historic voting security bill.”

    (To be continued)

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    briangj2  2 months ago

    (Continued)

    Anderson said she delivered “the same message” to Republican governors in Texas, Arizona, and Florida. Texas is the next big fight for Heritage. Anderson said Heritage Action wrote “19 provisions” in a Texas House bill that would make it a criminal offense for election officials to give a mail ballot request form to a voter who hadn’t explicitly asked for one and would subject poll workers to criminal penalties for removing partisan poll challengers who are accused of voter intimidation. It’s expected to pass in the coming days.

    “Gov. Abbott will sign it quickly,” Anderson said. She warned of corporate opposition to the bill, following actions by Georgia-based companies to distance themselves from the restrictive voting bill there. “American Airlines, Dell, they’re coming after us,” she said. “We need to be ready for the next fight in Texas.”

    In response to a request for comment, Anderson said in a statement, “We are proud of our work at the national level and in states across this country to promote commonsense reforms that make it easier to vote and harder to cheat. We’ve been transparent about our plans and public with our policy recommendations, and we won’t be intimidated by the left’s smear campaign and cancel culture.”

    https://www.motherjones.com/politics/2021/05/heritage-foundation-dark-money-voter-suppression-laws/

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    Willywise52 Premium Member 2 months ago

    Oklahoma just banned critical race theory.What a joke!A really,really,BAD joke!

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    Michael G.  2 months ago

    “When fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying a cross.” You may quote me. :-p

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    eideard  2 months ago

    Today’s so-called conservatives actually are populists. They thoroughly distrust education. Typically, because it’s an area of life they didn’t do well … and prefer to avoid.

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    Zuhlamon Premium Member 2 months ago

    An educated population is a danger to autocracy and religion, both of which relies on a suspension of disbelief. The neo-Republican party relies on ignorance and hatred.

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    The Love of Money is . . .  2 months ago

    I repeat myself, but if a flag flown upside down signals distress, how would the Confederates have signaled they need help to win a Civil War ? . . . . /S

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    Pgalden1 Premium Member 2 months ago

    Texas wants to ban “critical thinking” being taught in schools. Would Not want That

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    comixbomix  2 months ago

    “Hatesplaining”…way worse than mansplaining.

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