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Sep 3, 2016
Small u 201701251612
Sep 5, 2016
Small u 201701251612
  1. Luann2007
    9ChickLuannbean  over 1 year ago

    Hey! Wall of boring text day!

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    Squizzums  over 1 year ago

    Sounds like good clean paranoia to me.

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    zeimetr  over 1 year ago

    Huh?

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  4. Img
    bob GC Insider over 1 year ago

    all this will change when the next “big bang” occurs.

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  5. Enterprise at warp 249x249
    RWill  over 1 year ago

    It surrounds us and penetrates us—it binds the galaxy together.

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  6. I yam who i yam
    Kind&Kinder  over 1 year ago

    It’ll all get straightened out in a kalpa or two.

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    Arghhgarrr GC Insider over 1 year ago

    I don’t think entanglement involves splitting a particle rather it occurs when two particles like say photons get near enough with each other to become entangled. If an entangled particle then interacts with a third particle it loses its entanglement with its pair. So quantum encryption depends on keeping the entangled particles isolated until the properties like its spin are measured in one thus determining the spin of its pair..

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  8. Sky ctio big
    cbryja  over 1 year ago

    This physics is so strange compared to our everyday experiences that every one of us— including the professionals who currently are doing the work of trying to figure it all out— probably is misinterpreting what it all means or implies.

    Yet, so far, science does have command of certain facts— like how dark matter definitely surrounds us, very likely penetrates us (but possibly not), and very definitely binds the galaxy together. Dark energy, meanwhile, speeds up the expansion rate of space; but, according to Einstein’s theory of general relativity, this expansion would have been occurring anyway— even if the dark energy was not there.

    But in the far stranger realm of quantum particles, entanglement, and collapsing a simultaneously held spread of different particle positions into one when the particle is “observed,” misinterpreting the meaning of “observed” leads to some far-fetched misconceptions about what’s actually happening.

    It’s physically impossible for any scientist in a lab to make a direct measurement of where a subatomic particle is, or what it is doing, without hitting that particle with some other particle. And that’s the rub. If you hit it with another particle, you’ve interfered with it— you’ve moved its position and changed which way it was going. You’ve messed up the information that you were hoping to measure in the first place.

    So the act of “observing” a particle simply means having that particle interact with another particle. Whatever happens at that point presumably will happen the same whether or not a mentally conscious scientist is taking notes. Conscious decisions do not enter into the physics in any way.

    What’s so weird about quantum physics is that we can set up subtle experiments to demonstrate that particles really must be smeared across a whole range of different places, and have whole ranges of different values for other properties, until they encounter another particle and settle down. (But this seems less mysterious if you get used to thinking of all particles as waves of some kind.) Meanwhile, with entangled pairs of particles, when any one member of the entangled pair has an encounter with some outside particle, both members of the entangled pair respond to the encounter by settling their properties at once.

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  9. Lexi with her grandpa 2
    David Huie Green  over 1 year ago

    Claia Bryja said, “What’s so weird about quantum physics is that we can set up subtle experiments to demonstrate that particles really must be smeared across a whole range of different places, and have whole ranges of different values for other properties, until they encounter another particle and settle down.”.One of my favorites was the single photon experiment in which photons are emitted one at a time, split into two equally probable states or directions, then the two probabilistic half-photons interact with each other as waves before striking a photographic film, forming a constructive/destructive interference pattern in the process, as predicted..An even older usage is done in chloroplasts with division of possible paths low energy photons can take such that it they do it just right, they reinforce to give enough energy for photosynthesis to work. And they have been using the effect for untold millions of years..“Yet, so far, science does have command of certain facts— like how dark matter definitely surrounds us, very likely penetrates us (but possibly not), and very definitely binds the galaxy together. ".If it didn’t, it would be interesting to discover what kept it out, excluded it since it doesn’t react electromagnetically.

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  10. Lexi with her grandpa 2
    David Huie Green  over 1 year ago

    rwillatpatbar said, @DavidHuieGreen“Awww xD”.I had hoped you would appreciate it.

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    Weboh  over 1 year ago

    How does this study work? How would you observe that something is not there until you observe it? Observing it would make it be there according to this, but how do you prove it? You would have to observe the “non-observed” ones, wouldn’t you?

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