Tony Auth by Tony Auth

Tony Auth

Comments (13) (Please sign in to comment)

  1. PianoGuy24

    PianoGuy24 GoComics PRO Member said, 12 months ago

    Something must be done about the FRAUD within the food stamp program, not end it for those that TRULY need it! There is so much fraud within it’s system that so much more could be cut and there’d still be plenty for the ones that benefit from it.

  2. Zuhlamon

    Zuhlamon said, 12 months ago

    @PianoGuy24

    Yeah, it’s those Cadillac welfare moochers causing the whole problem, isn’t it?

  3. Darsan54

    Darsan54 said, 12 months ago

    @PianoGuy24

    Aaaaah, you got some real data (not ‘Sean Says’ type data) to back that up? Because I hear a lot about waste and fraud and never seem to see anything backin’ it up. Sorta like Voter ID laws.

  4. Doughfoot

    Doughfoot said, 12 months ago

    GOP: “Better to let ten deserving people suffer, than permit one freeloading moocher to get away with it.”


    But the Republican governor of Ohio says that his party is waging a war on the poor. Well, he will be purged.


  5. TheTruthHurts

    TheTruthHurts said, 12 months ago

    @Darsan54

    Subjectiive anecdotal evidence aside, what is wrong with voter ID ? Seems like COMMON SENSE to me. Why should I be against it ?

  6. Doughfoot

    Doughfoot said, 12 months ago

    @TheTruthHurts

    No reason to be against it. There has always been voter ID. I’ve never gone to the polls and not had to identify myself. The question is entirely about how it is done, and the effect the method has and the manner of carrying it into effect. Just about all the schemes that have been put into effect disproportionately effect certain segments of the population, and they are always segments that tend to vote Democratic. If it looks like voter suppression, walks like voters suppression, and quacks like voter suppression, it probably IS voter suppression. Eliminating, curtailing, or blocking early voting, not providing enough polling stations, or poll workers to prevent long lines and long waits is another method. Voting is supposed to be one of our most important rights as citizens, and every effort ought to be made to ensure we can vote, rather than placing hurdles in our way.

    If we really wanted everyone to do their duty and vote, we would regard failure to vote in the same light as shirking jury duty, tax evasion, and draft dodging. Here, in the 18th century, and even today in Australia and other places, failure to vote is punishable by a fine. Election days are holidays in some places. And if you can identify yourself well enough to buy things online, there is nothing to prevent moving toward online voting: unless it is the profound distrust Americans seem to have for one another.

    But if we must have a new regimen of ID for voting, I would at least like to see it be consistent, national, and equally burdensome to all. A specifically issued voter ID card, say, that EVERY voter must have when he or she goes to vote. Perhaps even a national ID card that would be needed to get a job, buy a gun, vote, get a license, marry, obtain government benefits, etc. And a good system to make sure that every person can get one. Phased in over a course of years, perhaps, and not required for voting until there have been several years of establishing the system.

    Otherwise, it seem to me to be so much subterfuge. Look at the history of voter suppression in the past, and the reasonable-sounding methods used.

    One of our greatest (IMHO) founding fathers, George Mason, maintained that any man who is to be governed by a set of laws has a natural right to a voice in the making of those laws. ( Of course, that was before we invented the crime of illegal immigration. There was only immigration. No one was forbidden to come. In fact, the Declaration of Independence specifically condemns the king for discouraging immigration to the colonies, and putting barriers in the way of naturalization. One doesn’t hear much about that these days. )

  7. PianoGuy24

    PianoGuy24 GoComics PRO Member said, 12 months ago

    @Darsan54

    I don’t need the data…I SEE it ALL the time! I know people that gets paid under the table and don’t pay taxes, has a nearly new car, and STILL get’s more in food stamps that I ever do, while I do it the RIGHT way, you know, pay my taxes, pay for food with actual money, etc.

  8. lectricdude

    lectricdude said, 12 months ago

    @PianoGuy24

    …if you are aware of unlawful activity…i. e. “I SEE it ALL the time!”… and don’t report such activity to the appropriate authorities…you are abetting the unlawful behavior…why?…your claim of doing things the “RIGHT” way falls flat if you don’t report known-or suspected-illegal activity…it makes you an accessory to the “crime”…and you have no room to complain that you are being wronged!…

  9. lectricdude

    lectricdude said, 12 months ago

    …whether one is rewarded for reporting fraud or not is irrelevant…a good citizen does the right thing…because it is the right thing…whether anything is done about it is also not the issue…reporting the fraud is the good citizen’s responsibility…then it is the job of the appropriate authority to follow up or not…but the citizen has done his duty…which benefits himself and all law abiding people…that is reward enough in itself…any additional reward “icing on the cake”…

  10. Government Is Not The Enemy

    Government Is Not The Enemy said, 12 months ago

    @PianoGuy24

    Interesting how your post went from tons people doing it all the time to just one guy who gets your goat. Well, you should really learn the difference between anecdotal evidence and reality, as seen in evidence like data. You may think you don’t need to see the data, but you do need to see the data, or else you should self-identify as a low information voter. That’s simply the nature of data and information.

  11. motivemagus

    motivemagus said, 12 months ago

    @PianoGuy24

    HAHAHAHAHA!
    There is VASTLY more fraud in the banking industry than there has EVER been in food stamps, which are trivial amounts.
    Indeed, if the amount doubled, the money involved would be trivial compared to the bankers who brought on the economic collapse — and not one single banker has been jailed for that.
    And since food stamps are being cut over and over again, the amounts are getting even more trivial!

  12. churchillwasright

    churchillwasright said, 12 months ago

    I love people who disregard anecdotal evidence, insisting on statistics. Putting aside the fact that 98.6% of all statistics are made up, this paper speaks to the growing “underground” or “shadow” economy.

    "This “underground economy” could include anything from illicit activities — selling drugs, say — to off-the-books jobs in things like construction. There are plenty of examples of the latter: Bloomberg recently interviewed an unemployed woman who walks neighborhood children to their bus for $2 per kid. Surowiecki cites a study finding that “between eighty and ninety-seven per cent of nannies were paid under the table.” And so on.

    But those are anecdotes. Is there any hard data on the underground economy? Some. A 2011 paper (pdf) Richard Cebula and Edgar Feige estimated that as much as “18-19 percent of total reportable income is not properly reported to the IRS." That’s as much as $2 trillion in underground economic activity, with about $500 billion in taxes that aren’t being paid to the government.“


    ”http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/04/23/americas-2-trillion-shadow-economy-is-the-recessions-big-winner/">The $2 trillion shadow economy is the recession’s big winner

  13. NeoconMan

    NeoconMan said, 12 months ago

    @churchillwasright

    churchillwasright said, “I love people who disregard anecdotal evidence, insisting on statistics.”


    I agree; I’d much rather just guess at stuff, too.

  14. Refresh Comments.