(th)ink by Keith Knight

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  1. dtroutma

    dtroutma GoComics PRO Member said, 7 days ago

    The very culture of American style football is one of violence, far more than “sport”. Hmm, the nature of rugby, which is also quite “close quarters” doesn’t include lots of padding, helmets, and the appearance of an army going to war in full gear. Does that influence the difference in both players and fans that makes our so much more violent on, AND OFF the field. How many wives of FANS get beat up around the country?

  2. The Wolf In Your Midst

    The Wolf In Your Midst GoComics PRO Member said, 7 days ago

    @dtroutma

    If we don’t continuously inflame this country’s need for violence, then the citizens might start thinking that there’s other ways to solve problems and resolve differences.

    And THEN where would we be?!

  3. Freyja

    Freyja GoComics PRO Member said, 6 days ago

    You pegged it. McDonald of the 49ers is still playing. “Due process” my eye! They just want to win while they can with him.

  4. churchillwasright

    churchillwasright said, 4 days ago

    Keith Knight, who I believe is African American, is not going to like this statistic from Department of Justice [page 4].

    “Overall, African Americans were victimized by intimate partners a significantly higher rates than persons of any other race between 1993 and 1998. Black females experienced intimate partner violence at a rate 35% higher than that of white females, and about 2 1/2 times the rate of women of other races. Black males experienced intimate partner violence at a rate about 62% higher than that of white males and about 2 1/2 times the rate of men of other races.”

    In other words, it’s a cultural problem. As the majority of players in the NFL are African American, you will find a higher propensity for domestic violence among it’s players than in the general population.

    He— and others— should stop worrying about the specific problem of the NFL and start looking at the culture that is breeding it.

    Where’s Al and Jesse?

  5. agrestic

    agrestic said, 4 days ago

    @churchillwasright

    In other words, it’s a cultural problem.


    Based on those statistics, white folks also have a cultural problem when it comes to domestic violence, as white women are more than twice as likely as non-black women of other races to experience domestic violence—significantly more than the difference between black and white.


    In addition, if you look at that very same page, you’ll notice a very telling graph which clearly demonstrates that domestic partner violence goes up as income goes down. Considering that African Americans are on average much poorer than white folks, this probably explains a significant amount of the discrepancy between black and white domestic violence rates, especially since poverty is a known stressor in many facets of life. So no, you have no proof that it is a cultural problem among black folks. You only have your already-formed suppositions based on a single data point.


    So let’s assume you’re as white as Churchill was: well, where are you when it comes to dealing with the problem of white domestic violence? In any case, Al and Jesse (and many other African American leaders—why are right-wingers so weirdly obsessed with these two?) are quite active in addressing issues of violence within the black community.


    When the NFL had a chance to take some leadership regarding the issue of domestic violence, it punted. Until the public outrage became so widespread that it was forced to act more forcefully in the case of Ray Rice. This is sadly business as usual for the giant “non-profit.” It has proven again and again that it simply does not care about the welfare of its players or those around them unless people make clear that not caring will threaten its bottom line.


    The NFL is a highly public institution, and as such it has an outsize effect on the rest of the national culture. So when it’s confronted with domestic violence amongst its own ranks, why wouldn’t you demand it take leadership on the issue?

  6. churchillwasright

    churchillwasright said, 4 days ago

    @agrestic

    white folks also have a cultural problem when it comes to domestic violence, as white women are more than twice as likely as non-black women of other races to experience domestic violence—significantly more than the difference between black and white.

    Their specific quote is “blacks were victimized by intimate partners at significantly higher rates than persons of any other race”. I’m not saying whites don’t have a cultural problem also, but they don’t make up the majority of NFL players, blacks do. Therefore statistically they will have a higher incidence of domestic violence than the general population. (If you want to add that blacks, and therefore NFL players have an astronomically higher incidence of domestic violence than “races other than black or white”, I can go along with that. Now tell my how many players in the NFL are of a race other than black or white.)

    Al and Jesse… are quite active in addressing issues of violence within the black community.

    No. They are only active in addressing issues of violence in the black community if the violence is committed by whites. Black on Black crime is not a part of their business plan.

    This is sadly business as usual for the giant “non-profit.” It has proven again and again that it simply does not care about the welfare of its players or those around them… The NFL is a highly public institution, and as such it has an outsize effect on the rest of the national culture. So when it’s confronted with domestic violence amongst its own ranks, why wouldn’t you demand it take leadership on the issue?

    What I would demand is some consistency.

    The Recording Industry may not be a “giant ’non-profit” (oooh, Big Business = Bad), but it IS Big Business, and I’d consider it a “highly public institution” which has “an outsize effect on the rest of the national culture”.

    So “when confronted with domestic violence amongst it’s own ranks” (Chris Brown beating up Rhianna, for instance), did the President of RCA Record terminate his contract? No. Was he forced to resign for not terminating his contract? No.

    Instead he gave Brown a lengthy contract, and Brown went on to receive 9 BET awards, a Grammy, and numerous other awards.

  7. old1953

    old1953 said, 3 days ago

    Never been hit by an angry woman? LOL. The most under reported crime on the planet. I’VE certainly been clocked by women.

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