The Buckets by Greg Cravens

The Buckets

Comments (17) (Please sign in to comment)

  1. simpsonfan2

    simpsonfan2 said, almost 2 years ago

    Public school. While there are certainly motivated kids in Public schools, in Private schools, parents are paying for it, they will be sure their kids are motivated.

  2. Amber Thompson

    Amber Thompson said, almost 2 years ago

    Paying for grades.

  3. win

    win said, almost 2 years ago

    The handout generation.

  4. Pacopuddy

    Pacopuddy said, almost 2 years ago

    I like this teacher – he’s keen, interested and interesting, doing his best to motivate the kids – he does’t stand a chance!
    By the end of term he’ll be a broken shell of a man . . .

  5. unnormal

    unnormal said, almost 2 years ago

    @Pacopuddy

    He’s not likely to get them all motivated, but he’ll get a few of them . . .


    . . . hopefully.

  6. listmom

    listmom said, almost 2 years ago

    I had some really good teachers who would make sure everyone had their paper and pens out before they got going. Then they’d say, “write it down!” Of course, in my notes there were often more drawings than actual notes. Somehow I managed to make good grades anyway.

  7. david_42

    david_42 said, almost 2 years ago

    @unnormal

    One per teacher per year is all it takes. Don’t want the ranks of achievers to get too crowded.

  8. MikeFromMichigan

    MikeFromMichigan GoComics PRO Member said, almost 2 years ago

    Nothing wrong with public schools that involved parents can’t fix…well, maybe. My wife and I attended every open house and every parent-teacher conference for all 3 of our kids. In middle-school and high school we told, we asked, we begged each of their teachers to LET US KNOW if there was any change in behavior of our children, because we as parents understood sometime, some class, they each were going to sag off, stop handing in stuff, hit the wall, and we knew it was our responsbility to keep them at it, but the teachers had to let us know!!! BEFORE GRADES!!!!! Guess what? All 3 had that problem, only 1 teacher one time said anything …because, well they were good kids, they weren’t failing, they weren’t causing problems, it was just a phase. Arrrrggggghhhhh!!!!!!!! Teachers can’t save all their 100 kids they see a day, so they focus on one or 2 A students to help them get into the great universities, and they focus on 1 or 2 D- students to help them pass. The rest? Those between D and A-? Can’t help everyone! Parents who see that and want to know before the problems get too bad? Eh! I like public schools, but there’s a culture problem of most parents not caring, so the ones that do, the teachers don’t understand how to involve them. And so it goes.

  9. Strod

    Strod said, almost 2 years ago

    I think the colorist forgot that they used to have uniforms (well, white or red polo shirts) at Toby’s school.

  10. MIchael Matchinsky

    MIchael Matchinsky GoComics PRO Member said, almost 2 years ago

    I taught psych at community college and told my students they could all earn A’s. I allowed enough extra credit for it. Sadly, the class grades still came out the classic curve.

  11. Comic Minister

    Comic Minister said, almost 2 years ago

    Good question.

  12. Comic Minister

    Comic Minister said, almost 2 years ago

    Hey James Padget look at comment from last night.

  13. Night-Gaunt49

    Night-Gaunt49 said, almost 2 years ago

    @simpsonfan2

    Also unlike the public schools, private ones can pick and choose who they let in.

  14. Night-Gaunt49

    Night-Gaunt49 said, almost 2 years ago

    Not everyone can make A’s. It doesn’t mean we all don’t have things we are the best in, just not taught in school nor graded.

  15. fishbulb239

    fishbulb239 said, almost 2 years ago

    Complex issue. I would say that most of the challenges that face today’s student begin outside the classroom – myriad distractions, parents who don’t care enough to be involved, don’t have enough time to be involved, or don’t possess the skills that would benefit their kids, etc., etc. Still, though, it would appear that our school system could use a lot of work. “School choice,” however, as presently offered, seems to only make the matter worse. To me, “school choice” would mean, say, a traditional high school vs. a science magnet school or an arts magnet school, or traditional school year vs. year-round school, etc. Good school vs. crappy school is not a legitimate choice. If some schools in a system are clearly better than others, then any parent who cares and has time will fight to get their kids into those better schools. As a result, the kids of the more involved parents wind up in the better schools, while the kids of the less involved parents wind up in the lesser schools. This benefits the better schools at the expense of the lesser schools. If the charter schools are better than the public schools (in many cases, the verdict is actually out on that), then replace ALL of the public schools with charters, or give the public schools the same set of rules that the charters have. Don’t give the public schools death by a thousand cuts.

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