Ted Rall by Ted Rall

Ted Rall

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  1. AgentSmith101

    AgentSmith101 said, 6 months ago

    So taking something that didn’t belong to him was better than being honest? Naw, I’ll stick with being honest cameras or no cameras. We can deal with corporate greed another way.

  2. Michael wme

    Michael wme said, 6 months ago

    In the absence of cameras everywhere, the authorities must find a schlimazel to blame. A big theft cannot go unpunished if the top cops want to keep their jobs. At least with cameras, if the money goes missing, they can arrest the actual ganef.

  3. emptc12

    emptc12 said, 6 months ago

    Why is it always a given that an ordinary person who finds well-marked cash or property will steal it? I doubt it’s just me, but I have found property (or performed a service) many times and refused any reward. I told the person to “pass it on.”
    .
    If it was a big amount found I would not want the publicity, either. Somebody else can get the hero treatment. And these days, I might give the situation wide berth in case a camera is watching. I have found checkbooks on the subway, and put them (as advised by policemen) into the nearest mailbox. These days, I wouldn’t even touch them.
    .
    You used to hear of places where if someone lost a wallet on the street, that hours later it was still at that spot. Does that still happen?
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    And really, I hate things to get to a point when everybody expects a big percentage of the value of a lost item just to do the decent thing. It was just chance that it happened, and not everyone can afford an award.
    .
    So I guess I’m cheap as well as practical. And I value my privacy. Anytime you get your name in the paper, even for good stuff, it can turn out to be a hassle.

  4. jrmerm

    jrmerm said, 6 months ago

    It is getting harder to do the right and decent thing. Come across a little kid separated from its guardian in some public place like a park or shopping mall. Then try to do the right thing by bringing it to someone’s attention. Find out how happy everyone is with you because you helped out a lost little kid. Then make sure you have a good lawyer and can post bail.

  5. braindead08

    braindead08 GoComics PRO Member said, 6 months ago

    I don’t s’pose any of the Job Creators at Brinks ever considered giving him a Job? Y’know, one with health benefits and all?
    -
    Nah. Better to dump $5k and be done with it.

  6. MangeyMoose

    MangeyMoose said, 6 months ago

    @braindead08

    Best post!

  7. johnbi5

    johnbi5 GoComics PRO Member said, 6 months ago

    Big Brother is already here.

  8. TripleAxel

    TripleAxel said, 6 months ago

    I say he is a richer man for his honesty.

  9. DoctorUmmmNo

    DoctorUmmmNo said, 6 months ago

    Fail, Rall. Total, epic, major ethical fail.

    The money did not belong to Brinks, though they were certainly insured for any loss. Losses would eventually result in an increase in Brinks’ insurance, which would only be passed on to their customers. Some are big corporations, some are not. Eventually, the cost gets passed to the customer. That’s me & you.

    It’s one thing to push for wealth transfer through legislative means (odious, but legal), but you’re not doing that. Joe Cornell understands right from wrong, but you don;t.

  10. Ted Rall

    Ted Rall GoComics PRO Member said, 6 months ago

    @emptc12

    The point here isn’t the ethical dilemma. I have often found purses, wallets, phones etc., and always returned them – sometimes at significant personal expense. I don’t think I’m special. I expect everyone to do the same…though there was that jerk who stole my glasses off my table that time at the restaurant.

    The point is, what is the good of being good when we do it out of fear?

  11. Rx71Wm29

    Rx71Wm29 GoComics PRO Member said, 6 months ago

    Now I’m wondering what Joe would have done if that same bag of money dropped out of a Brinks’ drone?

  12. Rx71Wm29

    Rx71Wm29 GoComics PRO Member said, 6 months ago

    “…what is the point of doing good when we do it out of fear?”
    #
    That sounds like the typical teenager’s dilemma (male or female). After all, isn’t it the fear of one’s parents’ wrath (or, in lieu of a parent, society’s wrath) that is supposed to drive the teen’s good behavior?

  13. emptc12

    emptc12 said, 6 months ago

    @Ted Rall

    I’m afraid I indulged myself by expressing a comment not exactly to your point. I basically agree with you. As with everything else, some news media take good impulses and commercialize them for entertainment. And thereby cheapen them.
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    Would people do good consistently without hope of reward or fear of punishment if not for the Eye in the Sky that once was God but now are security cameras? It’s debatable, but most people would probably say no.
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    And even though I am no longer as religious as when a child, I remember in the Act of Contrition traditionally said at the end of confession, “…And I detest all my sins because of Thy just punishment. But most of all because they offend Thee, my God, Who art deserving of all my love…” I am amused by that disclaimer, as if it is to reassure a frowning God, “Ooh, ooh, I’m really sincerely purely sorry here, not because I’m afraid of being smote!” Yeah, sure.
    .
    It’s better to do right always, and for pure reasons; but what did Mark Twain say about that?

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