Steve Breen by Steve Breen

Steve Breen

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  1. wmconelly

    wmconelly said, over 1 year ago

    If the type of business alluded to here wants to leave California for the open and windswept plains, I’d say let her go.

  2. thegreatack

    thegreatack said, over 1 year ago

    Texas Job Rustlers.

  3. Clark  Kent

    Clark Kent said, over 1 year ago

    To hell with both states, I’ll stay here in Chicagoland.

  4. Jim Guess

    Jim Guess said, over 1 year ago

    Amazing! The comments again are from CLUELESS people!

    Sure, Texas is inviting … but because they don’t have an income tax and the business tax is the lowest in the nation.

    Not like California, which RAISED taxes on businesses … again …

    I live in Oklahoma. There are four families that moved here from California, just to my neighborhood, to escape the high taxes.

  5. Peabody-Martini

    Peabody-Martini said, over 1 year ago

    In all the standard of living indexes Texas ranks at or near the bottom. If a business thinks that there is a benefit to relocating to a low tax/high fee state with a uneducated unhealthy workforce and a polluted landscape let them have fun.

  6. Bruce4671

    Bruce4671 GoComics PRO Member said, over 1 year ago

    There are 627 crimes per sq mile in Chicago. 10.33 violent crimes per 1000 people. That’s a 1 in 97 chance of becoming a victim of a violent crime in Chicago.

    http://www.neighborhoodscout.com/il/chicago/crime/

    Meanwhile, in Austin, Texas, there are 154 crimes per sq mile and 4.26 violent crimes per 1000 people. A 1 in 235 chance of becoming a victim.

    http://www.neighborhoodscout.com/tx/austin/crime/

    Gee, in MY little neck of the woods there are 35 crimes per sq mile and 0.76 violent crimes per 1000 people. A 1 in 1309 chance of becoming a victim of violent crime. Shoot, there is only a 1 in 194 chance in the whole state ( and we have cities like Miami in the mix) of becoming a victim of violent crime.

    Yep, Kent should stay where he is and hunker down.

  7. Bruce4671

    Bruce4671 GoComics PRO Member said, over 1 year ago

    @Peabody-Martini

    Hey, I want to understand where you are coming from but can’t unless you give some references. I looked but only found old reports like these:

    http://www.gallup.com/poll/125834/standard-living-north-dakotans-satisfied.aspx

    http://isteve.blogspot.com/2005/05/standard-of-living-by-state.html

    And then there is this calculator that is at odds with you as well.

    http://www.bestplaces.net/col/?salary=50000&city1=50653000&city2=54805000

    So, tell me, is it better to have a job in a middle class salary range in California or Texas? Could you sustain yourself longer in California by flipping burgers or Texas?

  8. corzak

    corzak said, over 1 year ago

    @Jim Guess

    “I live in Oklahoma. There are four families that moved here from California, just to my neighborhood, to escape the high taxes”

    Perfect. They should stay there.

    Maybe they’ll help lift Oklahoma from below national average GDP. Maybe they’ll help turn Oklahoma from being a drain on the Federal government. Turn it from a subsidized ‘taker state’ into a ‘payer state’.

  9. mickey1339

    mickey1339 GoComics PRO Member said, over 1 year ago

    I’m typically pretty good with finding data online, but the majority of articles I find looking up “standard of living” kicks back to “cost of living,” which has tons of reports. They are very different issues, especially since standard of living is a broader category and would include cost of living as a factor. Also, cost of living is pretty much a hard data analysis while standard of living is more subjective.

  10. Bruce4671

    Bruce4671 GoComics PRO Member said, over 1 year ago

    @mickey1339

    My findings and though as well. So thinking of “standard of living”, wouldn’t that be something the person involved in the metric influence with their personal requirement? I mean, one person may be “satisfied” with one "standard’ and others may see it as “not satisfactory” for them.

    As a father of four, I managed to put food on the table, threads on their backs and a roof over their heads but seldom earned over 40K a year while they all lived at home. We lived well. On a budget but well.

    Meanwhile, there were families of less volume and more means that were NOT satisfied and to here them talk NOT living well on the same amount in my neighborhood.

    So to me a “standard of living” relies on opinion while the cost of living is just numbers.

  11. pirate227

    pirate227 said, over 1 year ago

    @Bruce4671

    You compare Chicago to Austin? LOL!
    Compare Chicago to Houston and run those numbers, if you dare.

  12. Rad-ish

    Rad-ish GoComics PRO Member said, over 1 year ago

    I can recall when people from Oklahoma and Texas moved to California. Texas min wage is lower than Calif, but so is the standard of living.

  13. corzak

    corzak said, over 1 year ago

    @Bruce4671

    @mickey1339
    "one person may be “satisfied” with one “standard’ and others may see it as “not satisfactory” for them”

    I’ll have to look to find . . . but I remember reading some research on this, and you’re correct . . .

    If someone is making $40 K a year, and everyone around them is making about $40 K – that person is ‘happy and satisfied’.

    If someone is making $180 K a year, but everyone around them is making $300 K – that person is ‘unhappy and unfullfiled’ !

    lol . . . human nature . . . we’re ‘herd animals’ !

  14. Bruce4671

    Bruce4671 GoComics PRO Member said, over 1 year ago

    @pirate227

    Houston:

    9.78 violent crimes per 1000 people.

    1 in 102 chance to become a victim of violent crime

    210 crimes per sq mile

    terrible but better than Chicago

  15. Bruce4671

    Bruce4671 GoComics PRO Member said, over 1 year ago

    @DrCanuck

    Sure Doc. I can. Again it is a subjunctive measurement dependent on the opinion of the individual.

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