Starslip by Kris Straub

StarslipNo Zoom

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  1. ship wright

    ship wright said, 9 months ago

    If it’s more about the journey than the destination then, yes, it can be quite depressing, but also quite humorous. Humans are just about the greatest source of free entertainment in the universe.

  2. Enoki

    Enoki said, 9 months ago

    More like insane and surreal….

  3. Night-Gaunt49

    Night-Gaunt49 said, 9 months ago

    Virgin births or parthenogenesis occurs in some animals regularly and irregularly in humans.
    -
    ‘Asexual’ lizards and pioneer plants

    Wikipedia
    Lizard parthenogenesis is a built-in ‘fall-back’ enabling isolated females to propagate in the absence of males. New Scientist blunders on pioneer plants.

    Lizard parthenogenesis is a built-in ‘fall-back’ enabling isolated females to propagate in the absence of males. New Scientist blunders on pioneer plants.
    Published: 3 December 2011(GMT+10)

    This week’s feedback deals with whether parthenogenetic lizards (where the females grow and develop embryos without fertilization from a male) were on the ark and whether we misconstrued the order plants are likely to colonize new habitats in. CMI’s Dr David Catchpoole replies.

    T.W. from the Netherlands writes:

    Dear member of CMI,

    A few days ago, someone asked me a question which I cannot answer myself. The question was if parthenogenetic animals (like some “lesbian” land lizards), entered the ark of Noah. And if so, how can there be male and female of them when they only come in females?

    Could you please tell me what the answer is of this question?

    God Bless you,

    Regards,

    T.W.

    CMI’s Dr David Catchpoole responded:

    Dear Tony

    Thanks for your enquiry—to my knowledge, the first time we’ve ever been asked such a question!

    Your question prompted me to read up on ‘lesbian lizards’. The Komodo dragon is one example of a lizard exhibiting such parthenogenetic reproduction. It’s worth noting that:

    It seems that parthenogenetic reproduction is a built-in ‘fall-back’ option enabling female lizards making landfall on isolated islands to propagate the species in the absence of any males.

    Parthenogenetic reproduction mainly occurs in island lizard populations.
    It’s very rare that it is the only method of reproduction in those populations. (E.g. in the Komodo dragon population, it’s been estimated as accounting for no more than 75% of offspring.)
    When sufficient males are present, parthenogenetic reproduction is limited, i.e. normal sexual reproduction has primacy over the parthenogenetic option.

    Considering the above points, it seems that parthenogenetic reproduction is a built-in ‘fall-back’ option enabling female lizards making landfall on isolated islands to propagate the species in the absence of any males. Once males make landfall, normal sexual reproduction resumes.

    So your questioner can be answered using the above points. Point out to him that parthenogenetic reproduction was more likely to have come to the fore in the post-Flood world, as the land and air creatures dispersed from the Ark’s landing site. Though we cannot be adamant about the pre-Flood world, the context and language of Genesis 1 would appear to indicate a single land mass was likely. In which case, sexual reproduction would predominate, therefore all the various kinds of lizards and other creatures in which we see parthenogenetic capacity today would have had both male and female members. While taxonomists have a tendency to label an all-female lizard population on an island as being a separate species to other lizards, the biblical definition of ‘kind’ is much broader. So, the idea that Noah didn’t have male members of a lizard kind to take on board the Ark is plainly bizarre. Note, too, that a [single un-fertilised] female lizard can found an island population in the absence of any other lizard—no male or [other] female is required for parthenogenetic reproduction, notwithstanding the ‘lesbian lizard’ tag pinned on them.

    I hope that helps.

    Regards

    David Catchpoole

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