Speed Bump by Dave Coverly

Speed Bump

Comments (32) (Please sign in to comment)

  1. simpsonfan2

    simpsonfan2 said, over 1 year ago

    Cue the ‘I never use cursive’ comments…

  2. Digital Frog

    Digital Frog GoComics PRO Member said, over 1 year ago

    you shouldn’t cursive in front of the kids.

  3. SusanSunshine

    SusanSunshine GoComics PRO Member said, over 1 year ago

    When I was little I was eager to learn cursive so I could read the Babar books.


    By the time I was grown up they weren’t printed in longhand any more….
    I suppose that’s practical but sort of sad.


    Becoming proficient at longhand was kind of a rite of passage in my day…
    from small child to big kid.

    Maybe today it’s learning to use a smartphone.

  4. SusanSunshine

    SusanSunshine GoComics PRO Member said, over 1 year ago

    BTW….
    I had trouble when I started to compose the sentence that includes “they weren’t printed in longhand any more….”


    I started by typing “they were printed in …..”
    and realised I couldn’t say “printed in printing”
    or “they were printed” meaning they weren’t cursive…..


    I had to make the verb negative to refer to “that style which is NOT cursive.”

    What the heck is it called, besides “printing?”

    LOL

  5. VTX1800F

    VTX1800F said, over 1 year ago

    at this rate. kids will no longer be able to read or write.

  6. Rad-ish

    Rad-ish GoComics PRO Member said, over 1 year ago

    Photobucket

  7. cdward

    cdward said, over 1 year ago

    @VTX1800F

    Incorrect. They will simply be doing it in a fashion that our generation simultaneously created but can’t understand.

  8. cdward

    cdward said, over 1 year ago

    BTW, I recently had to do some research involving reading the minutes of meetings over a period of 200 years. Observing the evolution of the handwriting was fascinating. It got worse and worse until suddenly they were typewritten (somewhere in the 1910s).

  9. Gordon Long

    Gordon Long GoComics PRO Member said, over 1 year ago

    so what the ding dang does BTW mean?

  10. TexTech

    TexTech said, over 1 year ago

    @SusanSunshine

    I think what you may be looking for is the term “block printing.”

    As for me, I stopped writing in cursive around 10th grade. I wanted my teachers to be able to read my compositions and that was not going to happen if I continued to write in cursive. I have been printing everything save my signature for nearly fifty years now.

  11. tnhippiechick

    tnhippiechick said, over 1 year ago

    @SusanSunshine

    The measure of little kid to big kid cannot be learning to use a smartphone. Somehow, inherently, they have that ability younger and younger. I have a 3 yr old that can take my smartphone and find and play, without messing up any settings (like my husband will), every game the bigger kids have shown him once….

    Even though its not “taught” anymore, my kids have had to learn cursive because their grandmothers use it on everything. Interestingly, both my kids grandmothers, and even my grandmothers, went to Catholic schools, in different states, in different times, and ALL their cursive writing is almost identical. I guess they learned rigid conformity as well as writing…..
    They are ALL named Mary too.

  12. gmforde

    gmforde said, over 1 year ago

    I learned cursive writing at a Catholic school and can tell you that the way the nun taught it was to make the kid trace the letter written in cursive. The you had to try to make an exact copy of the letter, or a reasonable facsimile. I am left-handed. Before I got to grade school, they changed the rule about learning to write with the right hand only. I could never write the perfect handwriting. They gave me a passing grade only because I tried. I can believe that the writing could be identical, but it may be due more to genetics than to training or rigid conformity.

  13. T_Lexi

    T_Lexi said, over 1 year ago

    @SusanSunshine

    What the heck is it called, besides “printing?”
    -
    : ) I think you’re searching for the term ‘typeface’ or ‘font.’ And the Babar books were printed in a serif typeface, rather than the script typeface they had used previously.

    Reading Babar in cursive was so cool. My rite of passage was checking books out from the library that actually HAD NO pictures in them – oh, my! All grown up now ; )

  14. unicornstar

    unicornstar said, over 1 year ago

    @Gordon Long

    By The Way

  15. Tom Flapwell

    Tom Flapwell said, over 1 year ago

    @T_Lexi

    It’s also called manuscript.
    I still use cursive in notes to myself. It takes less time.

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