Rob Rogers by Rob Rogers

Rob Rogers

Recommended

Comments (18) (Please sign in to comment)

  1. dtroutma

    dtroutma GoComics PRO Member said, 3 months ago

    Sum of all fears: any loss of profit due to regulations that save lives.

  2. Rad-ish

    Rad-ish GoComics PRO Member said, 3 months ago

    Deregulation, its a right wing thing.

  3. feverjr

    feverjr said, 3 months ago

    “Water is not a human right”, says the CEO of Nestles Group, the largest seller of bottled water in the world. Corporations are people, they just happen to be psychopaths.

  4. Michael wme

    Michael wme said, 3 months ago

    Lots of people have jobs at Freedom, and the minor inconvenience of unimportant people who have to drink West Virginia water is insignificant compared to the benefits Freedom provides the country, important benefits like their executives’ salaries and bonuses.

  5. phredturner

    phredturner said, 3 months ago

    Acting more and more like our Chinese masters …..

  6. lonecat

    lonecat said, 3 months ago

    The regulations that work are invisible, so people don’t even realize how important they are. And because people don’t study history much they don’t have a sense of what things were like without regulations.

  7. Adrian Snare

    Adrian Snare said, 3 months ago

    @skipcarlsen

    Remove your blinders, MrConservative, and turn OFF your RL/Fox radio/TV.
    Remove your carcass from your mom’s basement and get out in the world ..to see for yourself…If you can still do this – that is….Hatred can and does kill…
    BUT, are things “perfect” .
    Hell NO.
    I still favor “fracking” AND regulation….Voter ID and innovation/reform/improvement…
    Coal mining…and the necessary respect of those men in the mines…
    Balance…..

  8. NeoconMan

    NeoconMan said, 3 months ago

    @Genome Project

    Genome Project said, “Freedom isn’t Free anymore. They just filed for bankruptcy.”


    Well, that’s the smart thing to do, isn’t it. Otherwise, they’d have to pay for all that cleanup. Far better for Big Business if the taxpayer does that.

  9. Zuhlamon

    Zuhlamon said, 3 months ago

    Putting above-ground storage tanks next to rivers?
    No problemo
    .
    No requirement to inspect toxic storage tanks?
    Hey, it’s government interference
    .
    When an accident happens and thousands of people are affected, the companies dissolve and are protected from prosecution.
    Oh well, that’s the cost of doing business in America, because Business should police themselves

  10. ARodney

    ARodney said, 3 months ago

    @Michael wme

    And Freedom Industries would provide even more jobs and benefits if they were required to run their business in a safe manner by hiring inspectors and environmental engineers and replacing tanks before they fail. But they went bankrupt, so (as usual) it’s the taxpayers who will be stuck with the bill while the executives get to keep the salaries and bonuses they earned while cutting safety to the bone.

  11. Beau Nobo

    Beau Nobo said, 3 months ago

    @Doctor Warbucks

    In your dreams.

  12. Jase99

    Jase99 said, 3 months ago

    @CCNJ's say the sky is falling

    “To all libs: Call your electric utility and tell them to disconnect your power because coal produces that evil electricity. They won’t miss you at all.”

    What electricity isn’t provided by my roof top solar panels is provided by the wind farm 20 miles down the road.

  13. dtroutma

    dtroutma GoComics PRO Member said, 3 months ago

    If you crash while driving on the ice with bald tires that you refused to maintain, it isn’t an “accident”.

  14. FlyGuyP38

    FlyGuyP38 said, 3 months ago

    Let’s get to building those expensive and unreliable wind and solar farms, get China on the line and see if they could loan us 600 billion more dollars.

  15. lonecat

    lonecat said, 3 months ago

    @Doctor Warbucks

    No apology necessary. It’s a “phonetic” spelling of “phrase”. The initial “ph” derives from the Greek letter “phi”, which originally was pronounced as an aspirated “p”, thus the “h”, but later on came to be pronounced as “f”. Some languages (such as English) use the somewhat illogical “ph” spelling in Greek loan words, but some others (such as Spanish) use “f”. In fact the Spanish equivalent for English “phrase” is “frase”. Even in English there are some doublets, such as “fantasy” and “phantasy”. I hope this explanation helps.

  16. Load the rest of the comments (3).