Rob Rogers by Rob Rogers

Rob Rogers

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  1. ConserveGov

    ConserveGov said, about 1 year ago

    Sometimes you just gotta tear it down and start over.

  2. Robert Landers

    Robert Landers said, about 1 year ago

    @ConserveGov

    Yeah, in another decade or two we can claw our way back to where we are now!

  3. sdut sucks

    sdut sucks said, about 1 year ago

    @ConserveGov

    Didn’t we do that with Iraq and Afghanistan? What a great plan for success that was.

  4. Rockngolfer

    Rockngolfer said, about 1 year ago

    I see crazy people.

  5. ODon

    ODon said, about 1 year ago

    @Rockngolfer

    Fortunately now they will be able to get healthcare coverage too.

  6. Enoki

    Enoki said, about 1 year ago

    Works for me. Now we can build something that has a blueprint and will get inspected before occupancy.

  7. mikefive

    mikefive said, about 1 year ago

    Although healthcare.gov and the PPACA are both a bit of a mess, at least the programmers are trying to correct the errors in the code of healthcare.gov. The PPACA has many good ideas in it but with many fallacies evident. The Democrats and Republicans in Congress are well aware of these fallacies yet are doing nothing to correct them. Congress should use the programmers as an example and work at correcting the deficiencies and excesses in the PPACA. Instead, one group says it should be scrapped and the other says it’s the best thing since sliced bread. A pox upon both of them for their belligerent attitudes!

  8. Northern Redman

    Northern Redman said, about 1 year ago

    @mikefive

    “the programmers are trying to correct the errors in the code of healthcare.gov.”

    No matter how much you polish a turd, you still can’t make it shine. You can’t change fundamental architectural flaws by correcting errors in code.

  9. I Play One On TV

    I Play One On TV said, about 1 year ago

    “You can’t change fundamental architectural flaws by correcting errors in code.”

    True enough. But you can’t change fundamental architectural flaws by telling people that they shouldn’t seek shelter in the only building available in the middle of a cyclone.

    If anyone were truly interested in fixing ACA, they’ve had five years to do so. I think it’s safe to say that there are no ideas on the horizon, and that Congress is just as happy to ignore the mess it’s created (see: Immigration Policy as an example) and preen and posture instead.

    How many of you posters here have written to your representatives to take them to task for doing nothing but blowing smoke? Raise your hands high; I can’t see them.

  10. mikefive

    mikefive said, about 1 year ago

    @Northern Redman

    “You can’t change fundamental architectural flaws by correcting errors in code.”

    Who knows, Redman. The original architecture may have been fine then they came in at 2/3 of the way through the coding process and told them to do this along with that too many times.

  11. Northern Redman

    Northern Redman said, about 1 year ago

    @mikefive

    That’s possible. However, I strongly suspect, based upon my IT experience, that it’s a performance issue related to fundamental database design and deadlocks on external interfaces, not speed of execution of the code.

  12. sclark55

    sclark55 GoComics PRO Member said, about 1 year ago

    We’re talking about more than just the door, as anybody remotely familiar with IT can tell you. The administration of the plan, with the database behind it, is basically the plan itself – without it, if we just strip away the system, we have what we had before. And conservatives did have fixes – let insurance companies compete across state lines, tort reform, etc.

  13. ODon

    ODon said, about 1 year ago

    @sclark55

    And how is it that has not been possible? Politics and cash over the better good?
    You betcha.

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