Robert Ariail by Robert Ariail

Robert Ariail

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  1. Enoki

    Enoki said, over 2 years ago

    Let’s see: The waste itself is a solid and not prone to dissolution in water. Water that is just H2O has at most a radioactive half life of about 14 days and is a very low level threat in any case. Dilution in a river would make it meaningless. So long as more coolant were injected to keep the waste cool there would be ZERO problem with a leak of that sort…
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    It is pretty obivious that Ariail knows ZERO about things nuclear too…

  2. mgkmkr

    mgkmkr GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    Okay, everybody raise your hand who trusts nuclear plants in their back yard, and believes they are safe from leaks

  3. Enoki

    Enoki said, over 2 years ago

    I was an NEC 3384 Chief Electrician’s Mate nuclear field in the USN.
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    As for my avatar it that is the character Barnette Orangello from the anime Vandread.

  4. dzw3030

    dzw3030 said, over 2 years ago

    @Enoki

    “Water that is just H2O has at most a radioactive half life of about 14 days and is a very low level threat in any case.” Your ignorance is showing. “Just H20” is not radioactive. The rest of your comment is equally ignorant.

  5. Enoki

    Enoki said, over 2 years ago

    @dzw3030

    dzw maybe you should familarize yourself with a chart of the nucleides…

    http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/chart/

    Some common isotopes associate with water include:

    Deturium, Tritium, (aka “Heavy” hydrogen), and Oxygen 18. All are formed in small amount when exposed to neutrons.
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    My “official” lifetime exposure is 188 mrem FYI.
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    Adrian, you have no concept obviously of the training the US Navy gives nuclear power operators. The USN is the largest operator of nuclear power plants there is and their operations are as close to 100% safe as can be managed.
    That is because operators start by getting 2 years of classroom and observed hands on training plus considerably more on an on-going basis.
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    The program made taking things like physics in college easy for me too.
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    So, I do not need to be able to design a nuclear reactor plant to know how one operates and the issues with one. I also don’t need a PhD in nuclear physics to be conversant in the risks and benefits of nuclear power, and certainly educated and familiar with the subject sufficently to comment intelligently on it.

  6. I Play One On TV

    I Play One On TV said, over 2 years ago

    And, as an aside, the strontium that is in our water supply, thanks to above-ground and Pacific Ocean nuclear tests, is why our bones and teeth glow with black light. Calcium does not fluoresce. A college biology professor stated that the replacement of calcium by strontium-90 is an irreversible reaction. If this is true, perhaps it can explain the increasing diagnoses of osteoporosis. It also means that treating that condition with calcium supplements would be a fool’s errand, yet that’s what is recommended to patients. Either we’re foolish, or my professor was incorrect.

  7. dtroutma

    dtroutma GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    Hmm, enoki: my son graduated from Charleston as nuke ET in the Navy, went up to NY to run the reactor up there with the folks from GE. Interesting thing was that in his class at Charleston, he had the highest exposure of anyone in his class, we had a mill in town, and two uranium mines 20 miles NW of town back in the 50’s. A kid in his class raised right outside the fence of a nuclear plant had no significant “background history”. Nuclear power sites aren’t “automatically” any problem with radiation. At San Onofre, the problem was the destruction of sea life (diversity, only urchins survived) in the outflow because of temperature changes, not radiation.


    Our mine sites were identified by the GE and Navy guys as one of the most, if not THE most dangerous “clean up” sites in the U.S. when they read the report, that Kerr McGee (owners) said was a perfectly safe place! It was spooky indeed to fly over the site at night and see the pond there glowing!


    Savannah River, Hanford, Rocky Flats, all have problems related to transport in water.

  8. ARodney

    ARodney said, over 2 years ago

    Yep. And Fukushima was private industry, and the West Virginia chemical spill was private industry, and Love Canal was private industry, and every single mine-related Superfund site was private industray, but that in no way affects your evaluation that government is always the problem. You need a more resilient philosophy.

  9. Enoki

    Enoki said, over 2 years ago

    @dtroutma

    I’m not saying at all that past practice in nuclear power and nuclear weapons production even more, hasn’t caused problems but rather that nuclear power can be done cleanly, safely, and in terms of cost per kW cheaply.
    There is an irrational fear of things nuclear and radiation on the part of a good portion of the population brought on largely by ignorance rather than anything else.
    I did prototype at INEL in Idaho at S5G.
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    Savanah River, Haniford, and Rocky Flats were all nuclear weapons production sites not commercial reactor ones. And yes, early practices left them a mess.

  10. dzw3030

    dzw3030 said, over 2 years ago

    @Enoki

    You stated “Just H20”, that indicates a pure state. The isotopes you mention are in your mind, not in pure water. If you have such a great education, it isn’t showing. Perhaps you should have paid more attention in basic English composition.

  11. dzw3030

    dzw3030 said, over 2 years ago

    So, you think he made a typo? :-)

  12. dtroutma

    dtroutma GoComics PRO Member said, over 2 years ago

    Addendum Enoki: as you should also know , the Navy’s reactor designs are MUCH safer than any of our current commercial designs . .. I’m not anti-nuke, just want less mining, using more of what we’ve already got for fuels, and think fusion would be fantastic if we can achieve safe containment.


    I trust corporates, like Kerr McGee, and GE for that matter as much as I trust my dachshund to kill and eat a pack of wolves.

  13. eugene57

    eugene57 said, over 2 years ago

    @Enoki

    “There is an irrational fear of things nuclear and radiation on the part of a good portion of the population brought on largely by ignorance rather than anything else.”
    Improper procedures and falsified reports, exposed during and after construction of some plants, plus lack of disposal plans for radioactive materials, had nothing to do with the decline of the industry.

  14. Kaffekup

    Kaffekup said, over 2 years ago

    Plus the fact that the “power that will be too cheap to meter” (remember that promise?) is generated by plants that are always off schedule and over budget. Here in Georgia, whenever Plant Vogtle construction runs over, the difference is charged to the current rate payers.

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