Robert Ariail by Robert Ariail

Robert Ariail

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  1. Michael wme

    Michael wme said, 12 months ago

    Good cartoon since it shows the crack near the top, higher than the level of the actual nuclear waste, so absolutely nothing to worry about. Just keep on fishing, knowing you’re quite safe with the NSA keeping close watch on everything.

  2. Enoki

    Enoki said, 12 months ago

    Let’s see: The waste itself is a solid and not prone to dissolution in water. Water that is just H2O has at most a radioactive half life of about 14 days and is a very low level threat in any case. Dilution in a river would make it meaningless. So long as more coolant were injected to keep the waste cool there would be ZERO problem with a leak of that sort…
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    It is pretty obivious that Ariail knows ZERO about things nuclear too…

  3. Clark  Kent

    Clark Kent said, 12 months ago

    @enoki,
    What is your expertise in this field?
    BTW, you avatar is just plain creepy.

  4. Baslim the beggar says, "Vanished is not vanquished."

    Baslim the beggar says, "Vanished is not vanquished." GoComics PRO Member said, 12 months ago

    @Enoki

    Nice try, but in fact, there is plenty of radioactive waste (Strontium, for example, that can be carried away by water. See, for example the problems with waste leaking from Fukushima, or from leaks from the storage areas in Richland, Washington.

    It would be far less dangerous to store materials in Yucca Mtn than where they currently are (open pits, storage tanks, and rusting barrels). These are usually near water, like the Savannah River.

    But of course most people overestimate the dangers of radiation. All those people in Denver, where the natural radiation 0.3 rems is stronger than the 0.1 rem threshold that caused the evacuation of Chernobyl. And Denver has one of the lowest cancer rates in the nation.

  5. mgkmkr

    mgkmkr GoComics PRO Member said, 12 months ago

    Okay, everybody raise your hand who trusts nuclear plants in their back yard, and believes they are safe from leaks

  6. Northern Redman

    Northern Redman said, 12 months ago

    @mgkmkr

    I worked at them for years and they’re fine, if properly managed. That usually means managed by private industry not the government. Savannah River Plant is a mess because it was created and polluted before anyone ever understood the dangers involved. Think late 40’s or early 50’s when they were still doing tests in the atmosphere out west.

    BTW, Baslim’s numbers for Chernobyl are way off. The quarterly allowable dosage for a nuclear worker is 1.25 rem. The average natural exposure at sea level is around 0.2 rem.

  7. MortyForTyrant

    MortyForTyrant said, 12 months ago

    @Baslim the beggar says, "Vanished is not vanquished."

    First of all the stuff at that site is in (rusty…) ground-tanks and semi-liquid, they have to keep it that way and stir it to prevent the beginning of a chain reaction (I kid you not…). It’s bad, bad, bad at Hanford and Sellafield in England is even worse!

    -

    Secondly the level of radiation is irrelevant, it’s the level of radioactive material around (that can get into your body) that is important. You can easily handle plutonium with rubber gloves, but if you give it a few licks you can tell your future widow about the stupid thing you just did…

  8. Northern Redman

    Northern Redman said, 12 months ago

    @MortyForTyrant

    There’s also the difference between radiation, like gamma rays which pass through your body and are gone, and radiation sources, like alpha particles, that continue to radiate.

    It’s like standing too close to a hot radiator versus getting a piece of hot metal imbedded in your skin.

  9. Enoki

    Enoki said, 12 months ago

    @Clark Kent

    I was an NEC 3384 Chief Electrician’s Mate nuclear field in the USN.
    .
    As for my avatar it that is the character Barnette Orangello from the anime Vandread.

  10. Rad-ish

    Rad-ish GoComics PRO Member said, 12 months ago

    Every TVA nuclear plant is leaking.

  11. Baslim the beggar says, "Vanished is not vanquished."

    Baslim the beggar says, "Vanished is not vanquished." GoComics PRO Member said, 12 months ago

    @Northern Redman

    The 0.1 rem thing is the US government’s limit for annual radiation exposure to the general public. People in Denver get 3 times that amount.

    But you are correct, the actual exposures at Chernobyl were much higher. My source says that about 30,000 people were exposed to 45 rems or more.

    The evacuation region was set by the Soviets to be a region where the lifetime exposure would be 35 rems. For some of that region, the exposure rate is now less than 1 rem per year.

    At 5 rems per year, a 20 year career would yield 100 rems total exposure. But the chances of getting cancer solely from that amount is about 4%. (The natural cancer rate is 20%, so your rate goes up to 24%.) But that’s if you worked for 20 years at the limit of exposure. I suspect there is also a lifetime limit on dosage.

  12. Baslim the beggar says, "Vanished is not vanquished."

    Baslim the beggar says, "Vanished is not vanquished." GoComics PRO Member said, 12 months ago

    Even plutonium can be ingested and not kill you for a long time. The father of a guy I worked with in the 80s was still alive with a plutonium particle lodged in his lung. That apparently happened when the father worked on the Manhattan project.

    The level or radiation is not important? Sure, Morty, go for a swim in that Cerenkov Blue water around the reactor. A different way to work on your tan… ;^)

    But yes, the key phrase in dosage is penetrating radiation.

  13. dzw3030

    dzw3030 said, 12 months ago

    @Enoki

    “Water that is just H2O has at most a radioactive half life of about 14 days and is a very low level threat in any case.” Your ignorance is showing. “Just H20” is not radioactive. The rest of your comment is equally ignorant.

  14. Enoki

    Enoki said, 12 months ago

    @dzw3030

    dzw maybe you should familarize yourself with a chart of the nucleides…

    http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/chart/

    Some common isotopes associate with water include:

    Deturium, Tritium, (aka “Heavy” hydrogen), and Oxygen 18. All are formed in small amount when exposed to neutrons.
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    My “official” lifetime exposure is 188 mrem FYI.
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    Adrian, you have no concept obviously of the training the US Navy gives nuclear power operators. The USN is the largest operator of nuclear power plants there is and their operations are as close to 100% safe as can be managed.
    That is because operators start by getting 2 years of classroom and observed hands on training plus considerably more on an on-going basis.
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    The program made taking things like physics in college easy for me too.
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    So, I do not need to be able to design a nuclear reactor plant to know how one operates and the issues with one. I also don’t need a PhD in nuclear physics to be conversant in the risks and benefits of nuclear power, and certainly educated and familiar with the subject sufficently to comment intelligently on it.

  15. Northern Redman

    Northern Redman said, 12 months ago

    @Baslim the beggar says, "Vanished is not vanquished."

    I agree with everything you just said. The incidence of cancer among nuclear workers is know to be 4% greater than the general population. The problem at Chernobyl was that it was acute exposure, the exposure rate per hour, versus the cumulative lifetime exposure which can easily exceed that amount with little or no effects.

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