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  1. Nabuquduriuzhur commented on Wizard of Id about 3 hours ago

    Science is intended to be deductive. We’ve always had examples of inductive reasoning, such as the Greek idea that the Earth was flat. Most peoples didn’t believe it, with examples like the book of Job describing the world as round. And other Greeks disproved the flat earth notion, even going so far as to measure the planet’s size with an error of less than 100 miles.
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    Global Warming/Climate Change is classic inductive reasoning, where one must alter data and cherry-pick materials to “prove” it. Some of it is ridiculous— 100,000 year old ice cores in Greenland when it was green enough to farm from ~1000 to 1300? Getting a 100,000 year ice core from ice that is at most 650 years old is quite a trick.
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    What’s funny is that I’ve been attacked by both sides of the issue for pointing out how glaciers function. Fluid mechanics seems to have been ignored by both sides.
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    http://img220.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=68794_gwcglacierfigure7_122_687lo.jpg
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    Basics for glaciers, but neither side liked it for different reasons. The GW/CC crowd didn’t like it because it meant the gases in the ice were squeezed upward and thus their cores would tend to have the gases squeezed from the older portions of the ice and the higher concentrations of gas were near the top of the ice column. Essentially, it meant that we couldn’t know how much CO2 and other gases were present at the times represented by the ice cores.
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    Lava flows do a similar trick. The gas bubbles are squished upwards and if the lava cools with bubbles still present, the direction of the bubbles can indicate the flow direction.
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    I used that once to determine if Upper Table Rock was an intracanyon lava flow that followed the Rogue, vs. a larger flow that the river later eroded to the current shape. It was an intracanyon flow. I used soda straws in the air bubble holes and plotted the direction with a compass and GPS. The lava flowed in a horseshoe, meaning it had followed the river channel.

  2. Nabuquduriuzhur commented on Liberty Meadows about 4 hours ago

    @vwdualnomand

    We usually camped in the Ochocos. No power, no generator, just coleman lanterns, coleman stoves, ice chests, and food we’d prepared, plus cans, bread, lunchmeat, etc. Tents and sleeping bags. Go into town a couple of times a week for ice and I’d usually buy a gallon of root beer at the A&W. Found out one year that if it got warm, it would ferment. Ick.
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    Before that, the grandparents worked at a local Guard Station and we stayed with them for a period in the summers. My grandparents and parents and relatives used to man lookouts at times in the area. That was back when the Forest Service was a professional outfit.
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    One of the really cool things was stargazing. When there are no lights around, it’s possible to see things around a person just from starlight. One of the lakes we would camp at would get a warm flow of air from the valley below around 10pm or so in the summer. Made for comfortable telescope and binocular viewing.
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    The fishing was excellent, but I never had much interest in it. Just as well because it went from $10 when I was a kid to more than $100 now. The state couldn’t figure out why so many people quit fishing. Between the idiotic sport-fishing idea (when I worked for NMFS, it was 25% mortality per catch, so most fish just got wasted for nothing) where the state tried to justify not having healthy fisheries by “catch-and-release” to requiring flies for fish that could care less about flies, but would only go for worms and other live bait.

  3. Nabuquduriuzhur commented on Pearls Before Swine about 7 hours ago

    Another greauxner.
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    Threaux dirt claudes at the screen…
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  4. Nabuquduriuzhur commented on Endtown about 8 hours ago

    @zorro456

    I’d call it warfare and survival. Wally hasn’t shown any interest in revenge to date, and I’d guess it’s not his nature. Sarah was trying to kill him, was a present danger, and he was justified in foiling her. It looks like the dittos are covering at least part of the people who a minute ago were wanting to kill him. Wally’s just not a killer and I’m glad he isn’t.

  5. Nabuquduriuzhur commented on B.C. about 12 hours ago

    True.

    Arnold Ice Cave east of Bend, Oregon, was used by the indians to store food.

  6. Nabuquduriuzhur commented on Endtown about 12 hours ago

    Commander Koenig: “Goodbye, Dione.”
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    Grand High Schmuckamuckette: “NOOOOO!”
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    (One of the few things I remember from Space 1999. A reenactment of Duck Dodgers in the 24th-1/2 Century).

  7. Nabuquduriuzhur commented on Nancy about 12 hours ago

    So what if she’s young? Doesn’t for a minute mean she’s in shape.

  8. Nabuquduriuzhur commented on Brewster Rockit about 13 hours ago

    Vitis californica tastes like a concord. At least in the lower Klamath. Given their appearance and flavor, I’d guess that they are both the same species. Seems like everything that has a gap in its range now is called a “species” nowadays.
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    If you want a taste treat right off the bush, eat a gummy gooseberry from northern California. Ribes lobbii. Things turn pink when ripe, and they not only are sweet, unlike most gooseberries and currants, but they have a sugar coating on them as well. The ones I picked were 1.25" long and about 3/4" across the middle.

  9. Nabuquduriuzhur commented on Buni about 13 hours ago

    Reminds me of a bad scifi movie called Logan’s Run. They blew people up in a ceremony while they floated up. Blech.

  10. Nabuquduriuzhur commented on Brewster Rockit about 13 hours ago

    First engineering project in college, I grew irradiated marigold seeds.
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    4 million rads, 500,000 rads, 100,000 rads, 50,000 rads, and control.
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    The first to come up was the 4m group. They came up, grew to 3 to 4" and died back, all in 3 days. They had badly crinkled leaves like peppermint and looked awful.
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    The 500,000r group came up, but not as fast, lived a little longer, and was noticeably misshapen.
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    The 100,000r group looked better, but didn’t last a week.
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    The 50,000r group looked almost normal. Leaves were OK. Petioles were twisted, though, with one being about 45 degrees rotated off of the 90 degrees they normally are.
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    The control group was last to come up and looked normal, of course.