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  1. Hobbes GoComics Pro Member commented on Calvin and Hobbes about 20 hours ago

    Panel 3 really emphasizes the height difference between Calvin and his parents. He is only 1/3 their height, so he is two feet tall or less.

  2. Hobbes GoComics Pro Member commented on Calvin and Hobbes about 21 hours ago

    If Calvin keeps this up, he will be toast.

  3. Hobbes GoComics Pro Member commented on Calvin and Hobbes 1 day ago

    Looks like Calvin dropped his weapon. You never know when a geyser may erupt. In this case, Calvin was standing too close to Old Face-Full.

  4. Hobbes GoComics Pro Member commented on Calvin and Hobbes 2 days ago

    @Arghhgarrr and Liverlips McCracken: By the way, I’m a “he.”

  5. Hobbes GoComics Pro Member commented on Calvin and Hobbes 2 days ago


    @Arghhgarrr: Bill Watterson said that Pogo was one of the three main comic strips that inspired him, along with Peanuts and Krazy Kat. Here are three excerpts from a 1989 interview:

    “Krazy Kat is a completely unique strip. I think it’s the best comic strip ever drawn. Ultimately, though, it’s such a peculiar and idiosyncratic vision that it has little to say to me directly. I marvel at it because it’s beyond duplication. It’s like trying to paint a sunrise — you’re better off not even trying. Peanuts and Pogo have been inspirations, too, but these strips are much more down to earth, and are much closer to my own way of thinking, and have had much more direct influence. Even so, I try to keep the instances of blatant plagiarism to a minimum. Looking back, you’ll see that some of the old strips are one-gag formulas, endlessly varied. Krazy Kat revolves around the tossing of the brick. Little Nemo was always a dream, and you know the kid is going to wake up in a heap at the bottom of his bed in every single strip. I find Herriman a lot more interesting than McCay, but both are working within a very limited construct. It’s a very different approach to cartooning that what we do now. I would go insane working with limited formulas like theirs, but on the other hand, Herriman and McCay gave us something better than gags. Back then, the fun was in the getting there. The destination of each strip was the same, but every day you went there by a different road. Today, we want the strip over as soon as possible — “Just hand me the punch line, please.” The fewer panels, words, and drawings, the better: I think Pogo was the last of the enjoy-the-ride strips. It’s a shame. We’ve really lost what comics do best.”

    “Walt Kelly died a few years after I discovered Pogo and if it weren’t for the Pogo books I’d have been deprived of a great influence. The same goes for Krazy Kat. New cartoonists don’t have to reinvent the wheel. They can build on others’ accomplishments. Books allow cartoons to live longer and that’s a real service.”

    “The size issue is crucial to anyone who cares about quality in cartoons. To save space, newsprint, and money, newspapers have been reducing the size of comics for years. It has gotten to the point now, where cartoons can no longer do what they do best. Comic strips are words and pictures, but there is little room for either any more. Most cartoonists, to make their work legible at tiny reproduction, have eliminated panels, line-work, and words, and the result is a drastic loss in character development, storytelling ability, and intelligent humor. A beautiful strip like Pogo would be impossible to read at today’s sizes. Adventure strips are dead. Comics have been deprived of much of their ability to entertain. Now we have a lot of talking heads and gags that could be read with equal effect on the radio.”

  6. Hobbes GoComics Pro Member commented on Calvin and Hobbes 3 days ago


    Calvin’s way of thinking involves a slippery slope.



    To view the following strips in the archive and help GoComics generate revenue, please click on the blue archive links below. To view the strips directly, click on the images below or stretch them.



    Calvin and Hobbes (November 10, 1989)

    Calvin and Hobbes (November 10, 1989)


    Ziggy (January 15, 2001)

    Ziggy (January 15, 2001)


    Peanuts (July 27, 1963)

    Peanuts (July 27, 1963)


    Mutts (June 22, 2014)

    Mutts (June 22, 2014)

  7. Hobbes GoComics Pro Member commented on Calvin and Hobbes 3 days ago

    @Daniel Quilp: Calvin’s hair grows really fast…..

    Or, maybe Calvin is standing on his tiptoes in panels 2 and 3.

  8. Hobbes GoComics Pro Member commented on Calvin and Hobbes 4 days ago

    Note that the lines on Mom’s sleeves always stay horizontal, regardless of the angle of her arms.

  9. Hobbes GoComics Pro Member commented on Calvin and Hobbes 4 days ago


    Mothers aren’t paid for the most important things that they do.



    Note that Calvin is so short that only his head shows above the bottom of the last panel.

    In the first panel, he is only 1/3 the height of his mother. If his mother is, say, 5 feet 6 inches tall, then Calvin is less than 2 feet tall — that’s only 22 inches (56 centimeters for those of you in the rest of the world…..).

    The average height for a six-year-old is about 3 1/2 feet — that’s 42 inches (107 centimeters).



    To view the following strip in the archive and help GoComics generate revenue, please click on the blue archive link below. To view the strip directly, click on the image below or stretch it.



    Peanuts (July 7, 1967)

    Peanuts (July 7, 1967)

  10. Hobbes GoComics Pro Member commented on Calvin and Hobbes 5 days ago


    Calvin was hoping to have the perfect summer, but unfortunately it still has a few bugs in it.



    To view the following strips in the archive and help GoComics generate revenue, please click on the blue archive links below. To view the strips directly, click on the images below or stretch them.



    Here’s one from the first year of Calvin and Hobbes:

    Calvin and Hobbes (June 7, 1986)

    Calvin and Hobbes (June 7, 1986)


    Here’s one from the first year of Peanuts:

    Peanuts (December 22, 1950)

    Peanuts (December 22, 1950)


    Peanuts (August 11, 1980)

    Peanuts (August 11, 1980)


    Mutts (January 24, 2002)

    Mutts (January 24, 2002)