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  1. Hobbes GoComics Pro Member commented on Calvin and Hobbes about 21 hours ago


    Today’s Calvin and Hobbes strip is from 1990. Bill Watterson may have been inspired by this Far Side strip by Gary Larson from 1985:

    Click here: The Far Side (1985)

    The Far Side (1985)


    Click here: Mutts (May 31, 2012)

    Mutts (May 31, 2012)


    Click here: Peanuts (November 26, 1968)

    Peanuts (November 26, 1968)


    Click here: Peanuts (November 17, 1953)

    Peanuts (November 17, 1953)

  2. Hobbes GoComics Pro Member commented on Calvin and Hobbes 2 days ago


    Hi, verticallychallenged.

    (Hmmm……. That sounds derogatory………)

    Charles Schulz avoided showing adults’ faces in Peanuts, but he did show some adults in a very unusual early strip (without drawing in their faces):

    Click here: Peanuts (May 30, 1954)

    Peanuts (May 30, 1954)

  3. Hobbes GoComics Pro Member commented on Calvin and Hobbes 2 days ago

    @Number Six: Are you sure that’s Calvin’s dad? He doesn’t seem to have aged much in 20 years, in spite of being Calvin’s dad. I’m guessing it is actually a picture of Bill Watterson, now living under an assumed name.

  4. Hobbes GoComics Pro Member commented on Calvin and Hobbes 2 days ago


    In the 3rd panel, the stuffed Hobbes is the same height as Calvin, except that he’s sitting down. If he were standing up, he would be taller than Calvin.

    No little kid would carry around a stuffed animal that large. Hobbes must be alive.

    :>)


    Here’s where Calvin first met Rosalyn, except that Rosalyn’s name isn’t mentioned:

    Click here: Calvin and Hobbes (May 18, 1986)

    Calvin and Hobbes (May 18, 1986)


    Here’s an early Peanuts strip, back when the adults sometimes talked from “offstage.”

    Click here: Peanuts (July 2, 1953)

    Peanuts (July 2, 1953)

  5. Hobbes GoComics Pro Member commented on Calvin and Hobbes 3 days ago

    Hi rgcviper. In the earliest years of Peanuts, the adults would sometimes speak from “offstage.” Also, there was an early Sunday series with Lucy playing in a golf tournament with adults. Only the legs of the adults were shown.

  6. Hobbes GoComics Pro Member commented on Calvin and Hobbes 3 days ago

    Hi MysteryCat. Yes, it does sound strange. Since there are no adults in Peanuts, Lucy sometimes plays a role that is sort of like a parent to Linus — relaying instructions from their mom, for example. In this case, it seems like Charles Schulz fell into that pattern, with Lucy talking the way that their mother normally would, by referring to “his dad” when talking about Linus’s father.

  7. Hobbes GoComics Pro Member commented on Calvin and Hobbes 6 days ago


    Hi, Number Six. Sorry to hear you are still a Prisoner in the Village. At least they haven’t changed your number.

    :>)

    Yes, Red and Rover shows influence from Calvin and Hobbes, and both strips show influence from Peanuts. In the Red and Rover Sunday strips, Brian Basset sometimes does some amazing artwork, like Bill Watterson.

    Interestingly, Red and Rover is set in the 1960s, so Red is about Bill Watterson’s age in the 1960s. Bill was born in 1958, and he was 11 years old when the first moon landing occurred.

  8. Hobbes GoComics Pro Member commented on Calvin and Hobbes 6 days ago


    Being unwilling to compromise one’s principles can be a good thing if one’s principles are morally just, and if one is being tempted or forced to perform an act of evil.

    However, it is very important not to confuse this sort of situation with being unwilling to compromise on anything ever, believing that this somehow shows strength of character.

    A total unwillingness to compromise in all situations does not show strength of character. In fact, it shows weakness.

    The willingness to change one’s position on something based on new insight or new data, or based on compassion for others, does not show weakness. It shows a combination of maturity, intelligence, and wisdom.